PipeChat Digest #3863 - Friday, August 8, 2003
 
Beverley Minster  Re:  Ripon
  by "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com>
Beverley Minster
  by "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com>
Re: I studied with...
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: Ripon Minster
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: How chest actions affect reed tone
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Reed Performance
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: practice possibilities: HELP!
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Ripon
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Ripon
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Ripon
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: practice possibilities: HELP!
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Ripon
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
practice organs
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: practice organs
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Reuter R-3
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
(no subject)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Reuter R-3
  by "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com>
Boston/Waltham
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Re: Reuter R-3
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
RE: Reuter R-3
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
Re: organ/piano duets
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
trumpet & organ music
  by "James Dawson" <wjdawson@oberlinmusic.com>
Re: Reuter R-3
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Beverley Minster Re: Ripon From: "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 10:27:50 +0100   Colin (and folks)   You mention in this post Beverley Minster. I have a vague memory of being there once. Is this a smallish church in a rather 'leafy' area, or have I got my wires entirely crossed? The church I have in mind had the organ placed in a gallery.....thats about all I can remember. The place I am thinking of was definitely in Lancs, but can't for the life of me think of the details!!   Can you help??   Paul.      
(back) Subject: Beverley Minster From: "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 10:36:31 +0100   What a fool I am!! Having checked the internet I see that Beverley =3D Minster is far from a small church in a 'leafy' area. =3D20   Can you help me out Colin?? What church am I thinking of?? =3D20   Paul.  
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 07:07:29 EDT   In a message dated 8/7/2003 2:06:33 PM Central Daylight Time, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes:   > Musicians and teachers have their > good names to protect, and it is only fair that their reputations should = not > be sullied by unrepresentative, incompetent, or ridiculous performers = who > imply that some genuine artist taught them what they do. >   I agree! I think one of the most blatant misrepresentations of this is = with Nadia Boulanger. A host of American organists (most my age or a somewhat olderlist her as "and studied with Nadia Boulanger" in their bio, but if = the truth is known, they may have gone to a class or lecture, etc., and not really = ever sat with her in actual classses or private lessons, and certainly never = stayed until to termination!   Oh, well . . .   Just call me Dupre's musical grandson,   Darryl by the Sea (student of Wayne Fisher who was a _real_ student of Dupre)    
(back) Subject: Re: Ripon Minster From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 12:47:18 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Thanks to Bob for that.......so simple.   In fact, so simple, it could not possibly be an English invention!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote: > Noun: minster > > (British) - any of certain cathedrals and large > churches, originally > connected to a monastery   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: How chest actions affect reed tone From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 08:47:09 -0400   At 06:20 PM 2003-08-07 -0400, you wrote: > In a message dated 08/06/03 10:31:18 AM, kzrev@rr1.net writes: > >"BTW, has anyone else noted how abruptly the reed stops sounding with d-e and >e-p actions? The valve snaps shut and the reed doesn't end gracefully--it >just stops. Often gives a choppy quality to passages. I think that's one >place >trackers really shine." > > Organbuilders fervently pray for good repetition of their note actions, >which requires rapid closure of the valve. Without a decent end to the note, >caused by the rapid closure of the valve, phrasing nuances and rapid >repetition >(or the playing of fast passages without blurring) is not possible. > All-electric valve actions behave differently than electropneumatic >actions. The valve pads open in an arc (rather than a straight up-and-down >motion), >and in some instances must travel greater distances in the course of their >movement. The manner in which air enters the pipe foot is also different. >While >many builders find a pronounced "quack" on all-electric valve actions, they >seem not to report it with electropneumatic actions. > One particular brand of electropneumatic action requires so much return >movement of the action that repetition of ANY rank standing on their >windchests >is problematical. > Conversely, you will notice that on mechanical actions, builders use >baffles inside the soundboard channels, and cavity-extending devices >either at the >ends of the note channels or in the reed boots themselves, to avoid >sympathetic resonance and serious speech problems. The closing of the >pallet can also >force air through the channel at the end of a sustained note and cause a reed >to squawk rather unattractively (and certainly NOT "gracefully"). > The assumption that mechanical action organs are somehow perfect and > that >organs with assisted actions are their "opposites" has perpetuated many myths >about pipe organs and organ music. As long as we are fixated on what a pipe >organ should be, and do not factor in what it should do, the instrument >and its >culture will suffer. > >Sebastian M. Gluck     Sebastian.   Is there any difference in pipe speech, but particularly the reeds, when comparing say a mechanical key actioned slider chest and electric slider chest. I guess what I am trying to say is, is the pull down action similar to a finger toggle on the keyboard as far as sound is concerned?   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Reed Performance From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 09:40:04 -0500   I don't disagree with you, Sebastian, regarding the fact that "the proof is in the pudding" in the sound and performance of a pipe organ, regardless of mechanism. That being said, I will still make two points:   1. E-P has always seemed to me to be a Rube Goldberg invention of needless complexity compared to the simple elegance of either tracker or electro-mechanical.   2. Yes, reeds need to speak quickly, especially for repetitive passages--but that still doesn't negate my point that I find it quite unmusical when a reed stops abruptly at the end of a lyrical passage. It's like trying to nap to Brahms' lullaby played in a staccato stop-time mode!   Dennis Steckley ___________________________   " The assumption that mechanical action organs are somehow perfect and that organs with assisted actions are their "opposites" has perpetuated many myths about pipe organs and organ music. As long as we are fixated on what a pipe organ should be, and do not factor in what it should do, the instrument and its culture will suffer."   Sebastian M. Gluck        
(back) Subject: RE: practice possibilities: HELP! From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 11:14:58 -0400   Dear Tom:   I bet your church has another of those janitors who, for some inscrutable reason, regard the sound of the organ as their cue to start vacuum-cleaning the "sanctuary" carpeting. This Pavlovian reaction seems to be so ubiquitous that it is as good an argument against church carpeting, from the organist's point of view, as any other. :-/   Seriously, if you specified a little more closely where in the "Philadelphia area" you live, someone might be able to suggest a practice possibility closer than your church. One can drive in more-or-less one direction for a full hour and a half without leaving the Philadelphia area.   Paul West Chester PA    
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 11:25:21 -0400   > Unfortunately, I still don't know what the term "minster" actually means.   It means monastery church. (That was what I'd thought, and I just checked Webster's International). The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church = or some such more specialized authority might provide further details.   However, as a second definition, Webster's also says that the word could refer to a cathedral or large, important church even though it had never been monastic.   When we say that Ripon is the oldest, are we talking about the age of the building or of some institution that built/inhabited it? If it is among the oldest buildings, then it would have to be Norman architecture, like Durham. It isn't, is it?      
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 11:28:49 -0400   Dear Blair,   If you or anyone else has a Church of England Handbook, could you check whether there are any royal peculiars outside of Britain?   (Or give the whole list, if it isn't too long.)   I heard once that Saint Peter's Church, Albany NY was a royal peculiar-- or has some similar relationship with the British Crown, such that they could tell the Bishop of Albany to jump in the lake anytime they wished.      
(back) Subject: Re: Ripon From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 12:25:19 -0400   On 8/8/03 11:25 AM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > Webster's also says that the word could refer to a cathedral or large, > important church even though it had never been monastic.   Typical (Miriam-)Webster, which is, by intent, descriptive of language rather than prescriptive. Never trust them without checking other sources.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: practice possibilities: HELP! From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 12:51:18 -0400   Gregory Ceurvorst writes:   The first organ I practiced on was my b3 which I bought at the age of 15. About a year after that, I got the pipe organ bug... I have just installed a 2 manual and flat pedal, 2 rank tracker in my = condo and am loving every note! No messing around with registrations etc...just = 2 pure 8' flue stops. Its all anyone needs to WORK WORK WORK!   This is almost exactly what Miriam Duncan eventually got for her home = (three 8' flutes-- two manuals and pedal), a beautiful little tracker by Kurt Roderer, identical to that which Lawrence finally ordered for a practice room.   Although the pipe organ was always my ideal and love from age 9 on, my enthusiasm spilled over to electronic instruments for several years, and understandably: not a lot of churches will turn over their precious pipe organs to a little kid, even for a few minutes; a child tends to be left with no alternative. How sad this is when it is the case. Fortunately, my own parishes weren't so fussy and I was allowed to practice there at least once a week, and sometimes after hours as much as I wanted. When I was 12 or barely 13, my parents and I approached LaVahn Maesch at Lawrence Conservatory about the possibility of my studying organ there, whether = with him or someone else. After the audition, he said not yet, I'd have to = work hard on the piano another year or two. (Most scandalously, I had trouble playing a simple F major scale for him, even though I was "working on" the Widor Toccata. As I was studying piano with a conservatory faculty = member, I suspect that he soon had an incredulous little chat with my teacher as = to how this gap in a student's training could exist.)   At one point Dad asked him, "What about the Hammond? Is it an = instrument?" Mr. Maesch replied, "It's an instrument. But it's not an organ." I remember this little dialogue very clearly, and it pretty much put the kabosh on my interest in electronics. It left me rather disappointed or chastened at first, but I soon resolved that I had better become more discriminating in my tastes if I ever wanted to study with Mr. Maesch. = Now, of course, I'd say exactly the same, especially with respect to those electronic instruments dating from anywhere around the 1960s!   So I'd advise against practicing on an old electronic except as a very = last resort. Most of the time, one would do better on the piano, as our = inquirer is doing. A brand new Allen or Rodgers-- that might be o.k., if you can easily afford buying and housing it, but I'd still try to get practice privileges on a nearby pipe organ. Of course, you must be prepared to pay something for it, but it is still the most serious and fruitful option, = even if the organ is not particularly outstanding.    
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 13:03:39 -0400   Alan points out:   >Typical (Miriam-)Webster, which is, by intent, descriptive of language rather than prescriptive. Never trust them without checking other sources.   I know that, and indeed it is often annoying/alarming, at least to rely this authority without remembering this fact. Thanks for the reminder.   Contemporary English, they say, can go in whatever random direction it wants. I appreciate the flexibility of our mother tongue, and its hospitality to innovation. But I maintain that in many cases, ignorance or incompetence linguistic should not be enshrined any more than to say that 2+2=5. Words have etymologies. Hence some of their usages or meanings will always be true to their history and hence make logical sense, while others never will.      
(back) Subject: practice organs From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 12:18:51 -0500 (CDT)   Tom, I would suggest you look at Ahlborn/Galanti or Church Organ Systems. Both have some less expensive models that are decent. Church Organ Systems has a model that has the speakers on top of a "console" that looks like the keydesk section of a Baroque period instrument, but the design is very flexible and the sound quite astounding for an electronic.    
(back) Subject: Re: practice organs From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 14:53:16 -0400   At 12:18 PM 2003-08-08 -0500, you wrote: >Tom, >I would suggest you look at Ahlborn/Galanti or Church Organ Systems. >Both have some less expensive models that are decent. Church Organ >Systems has a model that has the speakers on top of a "console" that >looks like the keydesk section of a Baroque period instrument, but the >design is very flexible and the sound quite astounding for an >electronic.   Hi,   I can vouch for the above. Ahlborn-Galanti, even their lowest priced 2 man. and pedal is a fine instrument, especially when voiced to potential. Factory settings are less than ideal.   The COS line-up is more variable, with a big difference between the 400 series and 500 series organs. The 500 series organs are good, and also much more expensive. The baroque style G-502 is an interesting concept, but is expensive, especially when someone is asking for a "practice organ", which usually denotes something to get by on, rather than top of the line.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Reuter R-3 From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 14:29:21 -0500   A week ago, I heard of a Baptist church in my area that has a Reuter organ available, so I wrote Reuter and received the spec. sheet (along with copies of the original contracts!) today in the mail. It identifies the organ as a "Model R-3"---there are three ranks contained in the original organ (diapason, flute, string) and there is another page on the back that lists a contract for an 8' Dulciana (73 notes). The organ was originally built in 1937, the Dulciana added in 1949. It lists the action as being "electro-magnetic": this is the "electro-mechanical / direct electric" type, correct?   Since the church would probably give it away, I might just go down and have a look at it. It's a pretty common specification---I've played Mollers and Wicks with the same specifications, but it's a pipe organ, nonetheless. Comments / remarks?   Paul  
(back) Subject: From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 15:46:46 -0500   Hello,   A pianist just asked me if I knew of any piano-organ duets that would be good for a wedding. Does anyone know of anything?   Thanks.   Alicia      
(back) Subject: Re: Reuter R-3 From: "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 15:52:26 -0500   Paul, where is this organ located? Which church?       Tyler W. Robertson Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist Church, Temple, TX Organist/Accompanist, Baylor University Concert Choir Drumline Manager, Baylor University Drumline 1501 S. 11th St. Apt. 131 Waco, TX 76706 (254) 715-6309           From: Paul Soulek <soulek@frontiernet.net> Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Reuter R-3 Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 14:29:21 -0500   A week ago, I heard of a Baptist church in my area that has a Reuter organ available, so I wrote Reuter and received the spec. sheet (along with copies of the original contracts!) today in the mail. It identifies the organ as a "Model R-3"---there are three ranks contained in the original organ (diapason, flute, string) and there is another page on the back that lists a contract for an 8' Dulciana (73 notes). The organ was originally built in 1937, the Dulciana added in 1949. It lists the action as being "electro-magnetic": this is the "electro-mechanical / direct electric" type, correct?   Since the church would probably give it away, I might just go down and have a look at it. It's a pretty common specification---I've played Mollers and Wicks with the same specifications, but it's a pipe organ, nonetheless. Comments / remarks?   Paul "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   _________________________________________________________________ The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Boston/Waltham From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 16:57:57 -0400   Hi all. I've been on deadline to file a brief and not paying much attention to the list, but that's all over with for now. I appreciate all the encouraging replies and hope those who did reply will come visit some time. I'm especially grateful to Alan and Malcom for their extended input in to the issue, and their remarks will be duly considered. Having lived in NYC for 20 years before moving to Boston, I know that Malcolm is right in his comments about St. P & St. T. Our situation is different, however, since St. Mary's is not a stop on the tour busses, as St. P's is, nor is it famous like both of those edifices (at least not yet!). Thus we don't have the problems associated with fame. While Alan's suggestion about changing the time of mass is a good one, I suspect that habits are far too ingrained here to get that one by anybody, plus I haven't been here long enough to have that kind of influence. It takes time...   regards, david baker    
(back) Subject: Re: Reuter R-3 From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 16:15:16 -0500   It's in the New Testament Baptist Church in Spirit Lake, IA--the building was purchased from Immanuel Lutheran in Spirit Lake when they built a new building in the 60s (they have a 1966 16 rank Reuter in a somewhat dead room, still a true joy to play! (especially with the mixture!)). I see on eBay there is another organ in Spirit Lake for sale: a 7 rank Kimball/Vogelpohl/Reuter (not the same organ that I'm looking at). The town is only about 3500 people (around 10,000 during the summer, vacation spot), it's pretty remarkable to have two pipe organs for sale at once.   Paul     Tyler Robertson wrote: > > Paul, where is this organ located? Which church? > > Tyler W. Robertson > Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist Church, Temple, TX > Organist/Accompanist, Baylor University Concert Choir > Drumline Manager, Baylor University Drumline > 1501 S. 11th St. Apt. 131 > Waco, TX 76706 > (254) 715-6309 > > From: Paul Soulek <soulek@frontiernet.net> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Reuter R-3 > Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 14:29:21 -0500 > > A week ago, I heard of a Baptist church in my area that has a Reuter > organ available, so I wrote Reuter and received the spec. sheet (along > with copies of the original contracts!) today in the mail. It identifies > the organ as a "Model R-3"---there are three ranks contained in the > original organ (diapason, flute, string) and there is another page on > the back that lists a contract for an 8' Dulciana (73 notes). The organ > was originally built in 1937, the Dulciana added in 1949. It lists the > action as being "electro-magnetic": this is the "electro-mechanical / > direct electric" type, correct? > > Since the church would probably give it away, I might just go down and > have a look at it. It's a pretty common specification---I've played > Mollers and Wicks with the same specifications, but it's a pipe organ, > nonetheless. Comments / remarks? > > Paul > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > _________________________________________________________________ > The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE* > http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Reuter R-3 From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 15:01:10 -0700   I have a three rank Reuter (opus 655, 1941) from an Episcopal Church in Prescott, Arizona. Currently, it is not installed but waiting patiently for certain things to fall into place. The ranks are Stopped Flute (97 pipes), Salicional (73 pipes with Haskell basses) and Dulciana (54 pipes). The only item missing is the blower.   It was one of the last instruments produced by them prior to ceasing operations during the WWII.   The footprint is such that is would fill one end of a liberal sized family room rather well. Check it out.   Regards, Mark S. Towne Southern Nevada Chapter, AGO Las Vegas, NV (ten months away from the arrival of our 53-rank von Beckerath at UNLV)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Paul Soulek Sent: Friday, August 08, 2003 12:29 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Reuter R-3     A week ago, I heard of a Baptist church in my area that has a Reuter organ available, so I wrote Reuter and received the spec. sheet (along with copies of the original contracts!) today in the mail. It identifies the organ as a "Model R-3"---there are three ranks contained in the original organ (diapason, flute, string) and there is another page on the back that lists a contract for an 8' Dulciana (73 notes). The organ was originally built in 1937, the Dulciana added in 1949. It lists the action as being "electro-magnetic": this is the "electro-mechanical / direct electric" type, correct?   Since the church would probably give it away, I might just go down and have a look at it. It's a pretty common specification---I've played Mollers and Wicks with the same specifications, but it's a pipe organ, nonetheless. Comments / remarks?   Paul "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: organ/piano duets From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2003 15:36:12 -0700   The old G. Schirmer "Blue Book" ... what the heck is the title? "Album of Organ and Piano Duets"?... has most of the war-horses in it, arranged for piano and organ ... The Swan, Ave Maria, the slow movement of the Pathetique, etc. ... I think it's still in print (Warner Bros?).   It seems to me there used to be some single numbers in the H.W. Gray St. Cecelia Series ... Jesu, Joy, Sheep May Safely Graze, etc., but they're probably out of print.   Lorenz used to publish a bunch of things ... you might check their online catalog.   If you're adept at improvising, you can just "do" Jesu, Joy, Sheep May Safely Graze, Ave Maria, etc. ... play the harmonies and let the piano have the running parts; and then solo out the melody when it comes in.   If you're near a big public library, check there ... there were some really fun OLD books with all KINDS of transcriptions.   I used to play the Mozart Fantasies from the two-piano version ... there are LOTS of those books ... that was how symphonies, etc. were issued in "popular" form before recordings.   The Walcha/Schott edition of the Handel organ concerti has the orchestra part arranged for a second keyboard instrument, if you have access to those.   Cheers,   Bud   Alicia Zeilenga wrote: > Hello, > > A pianist just asked me if I knew of any piano-organ duets that would be > good for a wedding. Does anyone know of anything? > > Thanks. > > Alicia > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: trumpet & organ music From: "James Dawson" <wjdawson@oberlinmusic.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 18:55:35 -0400   Dear List,   I'm playing for a wedding in which the bride would like Saint-Luc's =3D Rigadon & Passepied (I think she must have heard Michael Murray's Telarc = =3D CD ...)   Anyone know if it's in a collection somewhere?=3D20   Thanks! Jim Dawson            
(back) Subject: Re: Reuter R-3 From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 19:05:07 EDT   If you like the sound of it, and the keyboards aren't shot, it's worth your while to get it, even if you have an organbuilder releather it and tonally finish it for you for an extra investment. Small pipe organs in the 2 to 4 rank range are much more costly per stop than larger instruments, so if this little beast can be had (it may NOT be beastly), take it. You'll be glad you did, and it's the real thing -- a pipe organ.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City