PipeChat Digest #3867 - Sunday, August 10, 2003
 
Lineage and subjects
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re:St Vedast's Foster Lane
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
This Sunday
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: This Sunday
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Royal charter parishes
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
just to prove that I CAN multi-task (grin) (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
humperdinck's hansel & gretel
  by "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk>
Reeds and mixed chest actions
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: This Sunday
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: This Sunday
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Royal charter parishes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: humperdinck's hansel & gretel
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Christ has made
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: This Sunday
  by "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com>
Re: Skinners without Generals
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
Re: another for builders question
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Sunday Within The Octave of General Convention (grin)  (X-POSTED)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: another for builders question
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: another for builders question
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: another for builders question
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Sunday Within The Octave of General Convention (grin)  (X-POSTED)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: another for builders question
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Humperdinck's Hansel & Gretel
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
practice possibilities
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
IRC
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Lineage and subjects From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 10:36:56 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Isn't metamorphosis a wonderful thing?   From Ripon Cathedral to royal peculiars in four postings, but under the same heading.   At the very least, that makes for one loyal subject!   ------------   Changing the subject ever so slightly, there is a delightful "moment" in royal history which involves an organ.   William Davies, a former BBC staff organist, had been playing for an event at the Royal Albert Hall in London, at which the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mum was in attendance. Afterwards, the royal party moved towards the organ and HRH talked to William Davies.   "Do you think I would be allowed to play the organ?" Her majesty asked.   Obviously giving her the OK, HRH slid onto the organ bench as William Davies pulled out various stops for her.   With a twinkle in her eye, HRH pulled out the big Tuba and proceeded to play the National Anthem.   "That's the one I like!" She said, as the sound roared around the hall.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Myosotis51@aol.com wrote: > Hello mike3247@earthlink.net, > > In reference to your comment: > > > Why don't all our correspondents remember to > change the subject line as the > thread develops, > - > the subject was Ripon Minster, but has morphed > into > > Royal Particulars, - so the subject line needs > to > be changed as well. > > I don't particularly mind. That way, I can see how > the threads develop, and > the sometimes topsy-turvy way in which they're > connected. > > Victoria >   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re:St Vedast's Foster Lane From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 12:47:09 +0100 (BST)   Thank you, Bob, for your more detailed history of the St Vedast organ. Some of the sounds are very beautiful, notably the flutes, but a specific problem is the mixture of electric and tracker action, as the pipes on the tracker chests speak before those on electric action - this was certainly quite noticeable to the player 35 years ago. Also, it is a small church and the instrument can be a bit overpowering. The mixtures tend to scream and the choir mutations, being derived from the Dulciana, are out of tune. The listeners can get quite a battering. Although the NPOR appears to state that the manuals are all tracker, this is not the case - there is some extension on the choir, most of it being derived from the Dulciana, which also appears on the pedals. John Foss   ===== www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: This Sunday From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 08:17:10 -0500   Is anyone playing anything breathtaking and awe-inspiring at church today? I'm not interested in mediocre - got enough of that surrounding me.   The Queen Mother of Mediocre,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: This Sunday From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 09:53:19 -0400   Last Sunday I played the Bach St. Anne Fugue...at communion.   A request by the Baptist pastor and minister of music.   This is the same Baptist church that put the Widor Toccata at the offertory a few months ago.     -- noel jones, aago athens, tennessee, usa 423 887-7594 ------------------------------- frog music press, publishing MIDI music moderator, rodgers organ users group at www.frogmusic.com    
(back) Subject: Royal charter parishes From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 12:35:16 -0400   Glenda: I'll stop paying attention, if that will help. David Baker    
(back) Subject: just to prove that I CAN multi-task (grin) (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 10:23:04 -0700   I have posted the following (unaccompanied ad lib) SAB Advent anthems for small choirs to my download list; if anyone else wants them ...   PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE!   E-MAIL ME P*R*I*V*A*T*E*L*Y (grin)   so I don't push the wrong button again and flood the lists with attachments.   ALSO, please remember to specify *SIBELIUS* or *PDF* files. THANKS!   The titles:   Lift Up Your Hearts (Praeparate corda vestra, paraphrase) - C. Rossini - rather more interesting and contrapuntal than his Offertories. Slightly different text than:   Prepare Your Hearts (Praeparate corda vestra in English) - Jacobus Gallus   Praeparate Corda Vestra (Latin text) - Jacobus Gallus   Come, O Lord, Make No Long Tarrying - Remondi   O Loving Mother (Alma Redemptoris Mater in English) - Palestrina (SATB)   All English texts are the KJV, or close to it (grin).   AS ALWAYS, THE MUSIC IS *FREE*; donations cheerfully (and gratefully) accepted.      
(back) Subject: humperdinck's hansel & gretel From: "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 18:38:13 +0100   While the overture itself is a lovely piece, Lemare also made an excellent transcription of the prayer/angel-scene from the opera, which was published in one of the blue/red/brown/i can't remember albums of organ music. It can be bought in sheet form now though. It too involves double pedalling, and much thumbing down, but has lovely colours and was once described as the "Franck choral that Wagner never wrote" ! I've played it in a couple of concerts and it's gone down a storm, but is about 10 minutes long.   Best wishes   Andrew Caskie     >===== Original Message From BlueeyedBear@aol.com ===== >In a message dated 8/9/03 4:25:25 PM Pacific Daylight Time, RMaryman@aol.com >writes: > ><< and perchance do you know -- HOW does one get a copy of this score? I >understood that it is a transcription based on a Lemare player roll and that the >arrangement was never pubished in sheet music. > > Rick in VA >> > >e-mail me privately with your name & address & i'll send a copy to you. > >as far as a player roll, i've never heard that. it IS a lemare >transcription, though, and since the copyright date is 1899, it's now in public domain, so >i can PHOTOCOPY TO MY LITTLE HEART'S DESIRE!! > >scot >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Reeds and mixed chest actions From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 14:48:10 EDT   Planting fluework on slider-and-pallet electropneumatic soundboards with the vertical-drop pallet of the Blackinton-style action apparently exhibits great compatibility with reeds planted on individual pouch actions. Some practitioners have placed reeds on pouch actions and the fluework on all-electric valve actions, but there seems to be difficulty with simultaneity of speech, as well as lower quality of speech and control in the fluework. Electric-action pulldowns on slider soundboards tend to produce a more violent gulp to the speech, although some American builders are now relieving the channel at the opposite end of the pallet with a small valve that fires at the same time. Some organbuilders now using all-electric actions are routing expansion chambers into their toeboards (the procedure is often called "crossboring"), and they feel that it relieves some of the speech difficulties associated with all-electric actions in the past.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: This Sunday From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 15:22:36 EDT   not here-- Dale Wood something or another and Mark Sedio something or another.   Was hot on the hymns though.   dale    
(back) Subject: Re: This Sunday From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 14:25:18 -0500   Glenda,   I hope this meets with your approval!   Service Music for Northminster Ch. Monroe, LA August 10th, 2003 Installation of new Associate Pastor   Prelude Piece Heroique Franck   Introit "I Was Glad" Parry   The Gospel Lesson "The Spirit of the Lord" Elgar   The Choral Blessing "How Beautiful are the Feet" Handel   The Anthem "How Lovely Are the Messengers" (St. Paul) Mendelssohn   The Communion Anthem "Draw Us In the Spirit's Tether" Friedell   The Choral Benediction "The Lord Bless You and Keep You" Rutter   It was a beautiful service   Sand   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2003 8:17 AM Subject: This Sunday     > Is anyone playing anything breathtaking and awe- inspiring at church > today? > I'm not interested in mediocre - got enough of that surrounding me.   >  
(back) Subject: Re: Royal charter parishes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 15:31:17 -0400   On 8/9/03 7:37 PM, "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> wrote:   > St. George's in Manhattan, which was an adjunct of Calvary Church (where > Calvin Hampton played for many years) and which has a large, screechy = M=3DF6l=3D ler? > Didn't E. Power Biggs, record on that instrument?   Yes. But I can't remember what. I MIGHT have the LP around here = somewhere=3D , but it would take a while to find it.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: humperdinck's hansel & gretel From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 14:35:07 -0500   One of the great classics of 78 r.p.m. gramophone records was the Manchester Children's Choir recording of the Dance Duet from Hansel & Gretel (with, as I recall, Purcell's "Nymphs and Shepherds Come Away" on the other side.) Has anyone ever done an organ transcription of that one? I guess those of the Manchester Children's Choir still alive must be in their eighties or nineties by now.   I notice that Alfred Hertz did an Aeolian Duo-Art organ roll (#3106) of Hansel & Gretel, and imagine that was probably the Overture.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Christ has made From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 15:35:10 -0400   On 8/10/03 12:38 AM, "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> wrote:   > I'm looking for a nice rendition of "Christ Has Made the Sure > Foundation" for use as a postlude -- the bigger the better. Know of one? > I can't imagine that there wouldn't be a goodie in the Augsburg catalog.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: This Sunday From: "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 15:41:05 -0400   Lovely. Mari     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Sand Lawn Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2003 3:25 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: This Sunday     Glenda,   I hope this meets with your approval!   Service Music for Northminster Ch. Monroe, LA August 10th, 2003 Installation of new Associate Pastor   Prelude Piece Heroique Franck   Introit "I Was Glad" Parry   The Gospel Lesson "The Spirit of the Lord" Elgar   The Choral Blessing "How Beautiful are the Feet" Handel   The Anthem "How Lovely Are the Messengers" (St. Paul) Mendelssohn   The Communion Anthem "Draw Us In the Spirit's Tether" Friedell   The Choral Benediction "The Lord Bless You and Keep You" Rutter   It was a beautiful service   Sand   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2003 8:17 AM Subject: This Sunday     > Is anyone playing anything breathtaking and awe- inspiring at church > today? > I'm not interested in mediocre - got enough of that surrounding me.   > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: Skinners without Generals From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 13:12:25 -0700 (PDT)   Dear Stan: I have seen lots of old E. M. Skinners and other old organs which did not = have any General pistons. D. Keith Morgan   Stan Yoder <vze2myh5@verizon.net> wrote: > The church has a 4 manual E.M. Skinner which I believe was restored a > few years ago. Oddly, the console has NO general pistons; only > divisionals.   Reminds me of an EMS in Springfield OH (no longer extant - the organ, not = the city.) It was of 1928 vintage (Op.593), but the console plate read "Ernest M. Skinner Co.", a = corporate name no longer in use by then. It was 4M, with divisional combons on the setter system. = There were also three blind generals, set on a recorder board in one of the chambers.   I suspect this to be a case of using a "pre-owned" console, with the blind = generals added at installation in '28.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh           "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software  
(back) Subject: Re: another for builders question From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 16:38:46 EDT   Hail all Holy organ builders and friends thereof:   Being the slush bucket person i am--see my 1931 Aeolian previously = mentioned,   What is the current du jour feeling of 16/UO/4 couplers and of course 16/8/4/ couplers also?   do you use em at all? do you install cutoffs? does anyone use 73 notes to facilitate this?   Thanks...   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Sunday Within The Octave of General Convention (grin) (X-POSTED) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 13:52:27 -0700   I didn't go to Mass today ... nobody was home to take me.   These questions are primarily for ECUSA organists in the US, though I suppose there was a certain amount of fallout worldwide:       Was your attendance up, down, or normal today?   Was anything said about the Episcopal Church's General Convention?   Did anyone announce their intention to leave your parish?       Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: another for builders question From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 16:03:01 -0500     Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > Hail all Holy organ builders and friends thereof: > > Being the slush bucket person i am--see my 1931 Aeolian previously > mentioned, > > What is the current du jour feeling of 16/UO/4 couplers and of course > 16/8/4/ couplers also? > > do you use em at all? > do you install cutoffs? > does anyone use 73 notes to facilitate this?   Since with solid state coupling systems these couplers are now so cheap, it seems a pity not to include them whether you are going to use them or not. The best organists can make very good use of them, without overdoing it. In small organs they can be particularly useful. A few organists tend to abuse them, and in some cases this can be mitigated by installing cut-offs (also easily done with solid state), such as one to cut off the Great Mixture when the 4' coupler is on. I don't think many 73-note chests have been built recently, and I am not sure they are worth the expense. As a compromise it is always possible to do what G. Donald Harrison sometimes did, and use 68-note chests.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: another for builders question From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 14:10:51 -0700       Keys4bach@aol.com wrote: > Hail all Holy organ builders and friends thereof: > > Being the slush bucket person i am--see my 1931 Aeolian previously > mentioned, > > What is the current du jour feeling of 16/UO/4 couplers and of course > 16/8/4/ couplers also?   Absolutely! I specified them ALL for the new organ at St. Matthew's, which, sadly, will probably not get built now.   > > do you use em at all?   Constantly, if I have 'em.   > do you install cutoffs?   I would exclude the mixtures from the 4' couplers, but not the 16s from the 16' couplers, since you want them there when you're wailing away at the top of the keyboard in the big French stuff.   > does anyone use 73 notes to facilitate this?   Um ... might be worth it for the Swell and Choir strings and celeste.   Cheers,   Bud            
(back) Subject: Re: another for builders question From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 17:19:17 EDT   The trend is toward eliminating 4' couplers on the Great, since they really disrupt the balance of the ensemble. However, if it is a small instrument, this coupler can be useful in the hands of a thoughtful musician. The 16' coupler is most useful, especially for music of the later French schools, where massive tone played higher up the keyboard (such as in toccata forms) made use of this device on instruments of the period. On some larger mechanical-action organs, such couplers are available through servopneumatic lever stacks or "Barker" levers. More music has been written for sub-couplers than for octave couplers. The rationale behind the 68-note manual windchest may also have its roots in the French romantic repertoire... one could super-couple a division and still have enough pipes sounding at G56, the usual upper limit of manual claviers at the time. It is only rare that a work from that era extended to A58. When everything is couplable everywhere at every pitch, the organ not only loses divisional identity, but the musical line is lost, since artistic voicers and tonal finishers usually balance their work for the instrument to be played traditionally and rationally. Some firms, such as AEolian-Skinner, planted "dangerous" stops such as high mixtures on soundboards that were not affected by the 4' couplers. I have seen some Casavant organs from the 1920s in which the higher pitched stops were on soundboards that were affected only by the sub-coupler, and lower pitched and unison voices on chests that availed themselves to the octave coupler. Octave extensions on chests cost not only funds, but space. In recent decades, many organbuilders have returned to 56- and 58-note manual compasses, as well as 30-note pedal compasses.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Sunday Within The Octave of General Convention (grin) (X-POSTED) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 16:25:09 -0500       quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > I didn't go to Mass today ... nobody was home to take me. > > These questions are primarily for ECUSA organists in the US, though I > suppose there was a certain amount of fallout worldwide: > > > > Was your attendance up, down, or normal today? > > Was anything said about the Episcopal Church's General Convention? > > Did anyone announce their intention to leave your parish?   Most of our congregation were strongly in favor of Gene Robinson's election, and the handful of people who were not seemed to be taking it philosophically and did not seem unduly upset. There were a couple of single men in the congregation whom I had not seen before and who might have been gays checking us out as a result of the publicity the Episcopal Church has been receiving, but I did not get an opportunity to speak to them before they had managed to make good their escape. Apart from people known to be on vacation there did not appear to be any noticeable absences. The supply priest this morning (my wife is still on sabbatical) read out a conciliatory Pastoral Letter from our Bishop, which appeared to be well received.   If this is how it is in the city, however, I think the situation may be different in the more conservative suburbs and in the more far-flung parts of rural Missouri. I understand that the switchboard of our diocesan offices has been swamped with phone calls, quite a few of them vitriolic, and I gather from what some of our congregation say they have heard from friends in other congregations that a couple of churches are experiencing some conflict on the issue.   John Speller, St. Mark's, St. Louis.    
(back) Subject: Re: another for builders question From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 14:34:35 -0700       TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > When everything is couplable everywhere at every pitch, the organ not > only loses divisional identity, but the musical line is lost, since artistic > voicers and tonal finishers usually balance their work for the instrument to be > played traditionally and rationally. Some firms, such as AEolian-Skinner, > planted "dangerous" stops such as high mixtures on soundboards that were not > affected by the 4' couplers. I have seen some Casavant organs from the 1920s in > which the higher pitched stops were on soundboards that were affected only by the > sub-coupler, and lower pitched and unison voices on chests that availed > themselves to the octave coupler. > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City   Agreed, but if one does a lot of accompanying, as in the Anglican service, they're useful for shading, and finding JUST the right stop at the right pitch to accompany a particular anthem.   I used to sub every summer in a "high" Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod with a fine Schlicker organ, voiced by Manuel Rosales. It had only unison couplers, and MAYBE a Po/Gt 16' ... don't remember now.   At any rate, the regular organist returned from holiday in Germany on a Saturday, and woke up in time to come to the late service on Sunday. He's presided at this organ for 28 years, since he was 16 years old.   After service, he said to me, "WHAT was that GORGEOUS flute you used in the Vierne??" (Clair de lune, I think it was)   It had never occurred to him to play the Swell 4' Rohrfloete down an octave, and he's a GOOD musician (chuckle).   In the rebuild of the console when the organ was enlarged recently, he added as many couplers as the stop-rail would hold, since they came with the solid-state package.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Humperdinck's Hansel & Gretel From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 18:19:41 -0400   At 02:35 PM 8/10/03 -0500, John Speller wrote:   >One of the great classics of 78 r.p.m. gramophone records was the >Manchester Children's Choir recording of the Dance Duet from Hansel & >Gretel (with, as I recall, Purcell's "Nymphs and Shepherds Come Away" on >the other side.)   Yes John that was one of Columbia's "Top of the Pops" during the 1930's, and it was "Nymphs and Shepherds Come away" on the flip side.   Soon after that recording came out, The London Schools Choir performed both those pieces in a concert at the Queen's Hall, I well remember that concert, as they put me in the less than top grade "descant" choir, - or that was what we boys thought at the time.   We also thought that the "Nymphs and Shepherds" piece was far too "sissy" for us to sing, - although, as good choristers we did it, - but we didn't like singing those sloppy words!   I remember my grandmother telling me that we were much better than that "bunch of Manchester tykes". I also seem to remember that there was mention of a possible choral competition between the two choirs, - but as far as I know, nothing ever came of the idea.   >Has anyone ever done an organ transcription of that one? I guess those of >the Manchester Children's Choir still alive must be in their eighties or >nineties by now.   I still have a cassette tape of that 78, and I am indeed getting on a bit as I am heading fast to being 79! I cannot remember that there ever was an organ transcription of either of those pieces, as, in fact, the choral versions were themselves transcriptions of solo voice parts.   I can remember another "Top of the Pops" 78 of the same era, "Brother James' Air", which I seem to remember was a Handel arrangement, perhaps not, that we sang in the London Schools Choir   But the bane of all Head Boys in any church choir was Mendelssohn's "Hear My Prayer" which had been recorded in the late 1920's by Ernest Lough at the Temple Church under George Thalben Ball. This piece was heard throughout the land, and when ever a treble sang it, he was always compared to Master Lough. I liked the piece well enough, but not the fact that we were all in competition with him!   >I notice that Alfred Hertz did an Aeolian Duo-Art organ roll (#3106) of >Hansel & Gretel, and imagine that was probably the Overture.   I am sure that you are right, John, because I have heard the Overture played as an organ piece from time to time. But our organist, with her husband, played the Overture as a one piano four hands transcription, - which I think they did themselves.   Days gone by!   Bob Conway        
(back) Subject: practice possibilities From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 19:58:07 -0500   Greetings:   Don't forget the two manual/pedal reed organs that frequently appear on eBay or other sources.   The pre-1930 two manual Esteys often had heavy action, especially when manuals were coupled. The Estey Virtuoso organs, produced from the mid 1930's to the 1950's were built to AGO specs, containing over 10 sets of reeds and had tracker touch keyboards.   Granted, these instruments are heavy to move. The cases contain two suction units and generator, and usually need partial restoration. But when completed they are wonderful practice instruments and usually cost less that a used electronic instrument.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory   p.s. I have played a two manual/pedal Hinners which would also serve as a fine practice instrument.     -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: IRC From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 18:04:05 -0700   It's too hot to cook ... I'm on ... I may go grab a cold meatloaf sandwich at some point (grin).   Bud