PipeChat Digest #3872 - Tuesday, August 12, 2003
 
RE: hated reeds
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: hated reeds
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose
  by "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com>
Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose
  by "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com>
velocity sensitive action
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3871 - 08/12/03
  by "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: hated reeds From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 22:54:26 -0400   Kosher or not does not matter. As Ellington said. "If it sounds good, it = IS good." -WG   > From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> > > Is it kosher to use the vox humana together with the string celestes? = That > is the way it was typically used in my culturally deprived environment = (I'm > talking about my local colleagues-- I was usually too culturally = deprived to > have a vox humana at all). But a couple people who seemed to be more > knowledgeable about things in general would be heard to moan that they > couldn't STAND such a registration: strings, vox humana, and tremolo. > > I've never spent enough time with a vox humana to learn the uses of it > (except, of course, when a composer like Tournemire calls for it > specifically).    
(back) Subject: Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 22:02:50 -0500   Hello, Mike, et al: > Has anyone here ever been asked to play hymns, wrong > to satisfy the way the minister prefers to sing it > rather than how it's notated in the book? Examples > would be like dropping a couple of beats from > a whole note, singing quarter notes as 8th notes, etc. I have used note changes in some hymns, ...perhaps to get the attention of our people who become so accustomed to singing them the same old way they don't think much about the profound truth we are singing. One of my favorites is to change "Living for Jesus," admittedly not much in favor in the contemporary scene, and change the half note in the middle of each itterative measure and sing the stanzaic portion of the song in three (rather than four). Then, on the refrain, drop back into the normal 4/4 as written. I have deliberately improvised songs in commmon meter as a triple melody on the piano (or organ), just to perk the piece up a bit. I have not been a mind to add or take away notes that break the flow of the tune. If you go into many of the smaller country churches, where singing real slow is common, you will also find that they do not wait for the proper timing to pass before they start the next phrase. They get tired waiting on the normal flow to come around. If you have a pianist who can improvise notes and/or passing tones during the phrase endings, they will capitulate right back to singing the normal tune flow and timing. Been there,...done that. Know how it works when they sing without accompaniment and how they sing with accompaniment. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Re: hated reeds From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 23:09:51 -0400   i use the vox whenever i damned well feel like it.   once coached a friend who was having problems with the transcription of = the barbar adagio. in the building section, she couldn't find a good = bridge from the flues to adding the oboe. having played it before, i sent = her out into the church to listen to how i played it. she came back & = said, "that was perfect. what did you do?" when i pointed to the vox, she = said, "oh ick." i then said, "you liked it before you knew what it was. = the audience will never know what you're using; only that it's a smooth = transition to a bigger sound."   come performance time, she used the vox. the adagio was the audience = favorite.   on my own instrument, the choir gamba is strident, cutting, and = unblending. however, even it can be used in the right music.   scot in tacoma (enjoying my blue hawaiian at the moment)  
(back) Subject: Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose From: "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 22:11:15 -0500   Mike,   As the organist, you should be the one person in the church who knows the most about what you are playing. So you should definitely play things, for =   the most part, as written. Now there are some things, hymn-wise, that may need to be altered to suit the congregation or your own tastes, i.e., How Great Thou Art has some extra notes in some versions, and moves along = better in others. I will normally change things because either I am used to = playing them that way, or because I know of another version that works out better for congregational singing. As for the pastor, do with him with you do = with the congregation, get him to sing the correct way, the way you'll play it. =   You don't edit his sermons, he shouldn't touch your hymns. Good luck       Tyler W. Robertson Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist Church, Temple, = TX Organist/Accompanist, Baylor University Concert Choir Drumline Manager, Baylor University Drumline 1501 S. 11th St. Apt. 131 Waco, TX 76706 (254) 715-6309   _________________________________________________________________ MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/virus    
(back) Subject: Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose From: "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 23:25:36 -0400   I would say play their way, just because if a congregation is used to singing a hymn wrong, they will fight you to the end if you change it. = a): it's not worth the political hassle, and b): if they like singing it "wrong," who cares? Whether we like it or not, tradition is at the heart = of most everything that a congregation does. A change to their tradition in their view is an attack and will be responded to as such. Most of them don't even know that "their" way is different from what's printed, so why ruin your credibility? :)   Jim Clouser Director of Music/Organist, Our Redeemer Lutheran Church - Solon, Ohio B.M. candidate, Cleveland Institute of Music     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2003 11:11 PM Subject: Re: Playing things wrong-- on purpose     > Mike, > > As the organist, you should be the one person in the church who knows = the > most about what you are playing. So you should definitely play things, = for > the most part, as written. Now there are some things, hymn-wise, that = may > need to be altered to suit the congregation or your own tastes, i.e., = How > Great Thou Art has some extra notes in some versions, and moves along better > in others. I will normally change things because either I am used to playing > them that way, or because I know of another version that works out = better > for congregational singing. As for the pastor, do with him with you do with > the congregation, get him to sing the correct way, the way you'll play = it. > You don't edit his sermons, he shouldn't touch your hymns. Good luck > > > > Tyler W. Robertson > Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist Church, Temple, TX > Organist/Accompanist, Baylor University Concert Choir > Drumline Manager, Baylor University Drumline > 1501 S. 11th St. Apt. 131 > Waco, TX 76706 > (254) 715-6309 > > _________________________________________________________________ > MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE* > http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/virus > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.507 / Virus Database: 304 - Release Date: 8/4/2003  
(back) Subject: velocity sensitive action From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 22:33:07 -0500 (CDT)   There are circumstances where mechanical action is not feasible, and it would be nice to have the option of electric action that can reproduce the attributes of mechanical action. That's my only reason for interest in what happened to Syncordia.    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3871 - 08/12/03 From: "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 00:01:45 -0400   Glenda, I remember a recital at the Maine OHS convention during which a dog in = the yard next door to the church howled every time the Oboe stop was played as = a solo. I've had this experience with my Baskerbeagles, too. They don't seem to object to mixtures, but rather to individual sounds.   At the OHS convention this summer, a seeing-eye dog attending a recital became restless. He was taken from the church into the tower entrance where a kindly person presented him with a nice bowl of water. We were = all amused by the rhythmic SLURP SLURP SLURP. It was really funny. = Natural sounds or animal noises don't bother me nearly as much as those produced = by people who should know better (plastic bags should be out-lawed!!). ;-) The dog didn't like those high pitches.     Scritchies and Haruffarrroooo-bow-ha-wow...   Unkie...   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at HowlingAcres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 Help Some Animals Free: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=3D308025421 GET PAID to shop: http://ct.par32.com/?id=3D473FAAG381F58