PipeChat Digest #3879 - Thursday, August 14, 2003
 
RE: Job security (was Playing things "wrong")
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Playing things " wrong "
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Job security (was Playing things "wrong")
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Playing things " wrong "
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Wedding musi'Henry Glass'c
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Playing things " wrong "
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
A loss to the organ world ...
  by "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca>
crescendo pedal
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE: crescendo pedal
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: crescendo pedal
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: crescendo pedal
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: crescendo pedal
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE: crescendo pedal
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Westminster Certificate
  by "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com>
Long again My actual situation (was: velocity sensitive action)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: crescendo pedal
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: crescendo pedal
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Westminster Certificate
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
RE: Wedding music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Job security (was Playing things "wrong") From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 06:40:48 -0500   Bob, I am so sorry for you, and know that's it is rough. One goes through all sorts of feelings at a time like this, but God gives us other outlets, and perhaps you have rediscovered yours.   My husband was demoted Wednesday from senior investigator to road deputy - no reason given, but we have seen the political paranoia of this administration. My husband wasn't the first, and he won't be the last. But to put 18+ years into law enforcement, be good at it, know all the aspects of it and love it, and then to have his legs knocked out from under him kills self-esteem cells. Another colleague getting the same treatment quit, but my husband makes sure his ducks are in a row. He is heaping coals of fire on their heads by staying until he gets some confirmation of his retirement status.   This is a troubled time, and I'm thinking of you and praying for you too.   Illegitimi non carborundum - Amen to that. Keep on writing and playing.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Playing things " wrong " From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 09:00:58 -0400   On 8/13/03 10:14 PM, "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> wrote:   > I have served the same congregation since 1978.   Nice anniversary coming up next month?   Congrats.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Job security (was Playing things "wrong") From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 09:19:09 -0400   On 8/14/03 7:40 AM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > My husband was demoted Wednesday from senior investigator to road deputy > - no reason given, but we have seen the political paranoia of this > administration. My husband wasn't the first, and he won't be the last.   Maybe 75 years ago my paternal grandfather was Captain of the Guard at the Montana State Prison.   Politically sensitive position, of course. Then, one day, it was election time. That night he went to bed before knowing the final election = results. So in the morning, a Trustee came to wake him up, and asked him who should be the next governor. Grandpa had to just guess, and he guessed wrong, = and that was the end of THAT job.   My best to Glenda's husband, and to Bob as well (though his termination probably had nothing to do with politics in the usual sense)   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Playing things " wrong " From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 11:31:25 -0400   Mike writes:   >My beef is this: If these pieces are poorly arranged, then let them be =   heard that way. People think this new stuff is so wonderful that they=20 can just toss out good old traditional stuff without a second thought. =   Let them hear it for what it is. If it's awkward to sing, or sounds = stupid,=20 then maybe that's a clue that it's not so wonderful after all. If I = have to=20 cover up other people's bad work, then no one's really going to know. =20   Thank you for a good idea. It reminds me of an anecdote written years = ago about Mary Vogt.   She was an employee in Wanamaker's music department and also served as = Grand Court organist for a long time. She would sit down at the piano = and demonstrate music that customers were thinking of buying. However, = she often embellished it. The customers were delighted with her = playing, but when they bought the music and tried it out at home, they = were sometimes disappointed because it didn't sound the same.   However, I can think of one caveat: some music is not bad per se, it's = just not written well for the organ. If we are going to play it on the = organ, it might be in our interest to make it more felicitous rather = than work ourselves or our instruments out of a job.   Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding musi'Henry Glass'c From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 11:59:32 -0400   An anthem by Patrick Hadley is based on the text:   "My beloved spake and said unto me: rise up, my love, my fair one, and = come away. For lo, the winter is past..."   This anthem is moderately paced but very festive and jubilant-- dare one = say even voluptuous, with ardent crescendos. It's alost enough to make = *me* want to get married :-) A completely independent organ part = contributes to the effect.   I hope that you can find the score or a recording. The word "ravishing" = is particularly apt.   >In fact, I REALLY do need suggestions for some great English/boy choir wedding music with organ, whether or not you do the rest.    
(back) Subject: Re: Playing things " wrong " From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 12:07:54 -0400   If Bach had been satisfied with the traditional settings of his day, we = wouldn't have his chorale preludes, and he wouldn't have had to endure = nasty reprimands from his employers. He, too, lost church jobs because = people thought he played the wrong notes. Where I am faced with a long, = long note at the end of a phrase, including some of the traditional favorites, I still try to = maintain the rhythmic structure of the tune. Rather than shortening the = long note, I usually keep the accompaniment moving underneath it, and lead = in logically into the next phrase so everyone knows where I am going.   As for re-writing vs playing what the composer wrote, I have no problem = with changing the harmony or the structure of the accompanying voices. = After all, many hymn settings are 4-part homophonic harmonizations by Mr. = X of a tune lifted from a full-fledged composition by Mr. Y. So as long = as I preserve the tune, I feel I am being as faithful to the original composer as if I play = directly out of the hymnal. In fact, when playing something like "Joyful, = Joyful", or "Be Still, My Soul", I play a lot more of the original = Beethoven or Sibelius than ever appeared in any hymnal. Frankly, unless = Mr. X is someone like Bach or Brahms, I don't give a tinker's cuss what he would think.   Again, I am fortunate to serve a congregation and clergy that appreciate = rather than complain. I know not everyone is so blessed. As for letting = the lousy stuff sink itself without you helping it along, there's some = wisdom to that. There are several tunes in the Methodist hymnal that are = so strange, difficult, or just plain bad that our ministers apologize for them after = the singing is finished, pointing out that "the words apply so well to = today's message, blah, blah, blah" or whatever. Not surprisingly, these = are not always the ones I regard as stinkers.   -WG     > "Mike" <organist@clover.net> wrote: > > Yeah, but this is a style thing. I have no trouble putting pauses in > various places, broadening things out, playing slower or faster, etc. > Everything the composer wrote is still there. What I'm talking about is > making actual changes to the music like changing half notes to to > quarters, or whole notes to half notes just because it sounds slow. > There's a big difference between playing with certain style > characteristics and actually rewriting sections of music. > > Traditional favorites are no problem. The pieces in question are > shoddy arrrangements-- songs forced into a 4-part chorale format that > were written as unison melodies with a flowing piano part. What you > get is several measures of quarter note movement, then suddenly > something stupid like a whole note tied to a dotted half. It sounds = like > you're running into a brick wall. It really does sound better to = shorten > the long notes. > > My beef is this: If these pieces are poorly arranged, then let them be > heard that way. People think this new stuff is so wonderful that they > can just toss out good old traditional stuff without a second thought. > Let them hear it for what it is. If it's awkward to sing, or sounds = stupid, > then maybe that's a clue that it's not so wonderful after all. If I = have to > cover up other people's bad work, then no one's really going to know. > > However, if I raise too much of a stink, I'm really being a hypocrite > because I like to change and vary things all the time. I do it for = effect > and so as not to repeat myself. Why is that different from making > changes to improve not so good tune arrangements? > > Thanks, > Mike    
(back) Subject: A loss to the organ world ... From: "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 13:51:37 -0300   For any of you who knew Mr. David MacDonald of Halifax it will be,=20 perhaps, a shock to learn that he passed away last Friday August 8,=20 2003 at the age of 51.   =46rom his obituary in the Halifax Chronicle-Herald Monday August 11,=20=   2003:   .... organist, teacher, and conductor, David MacDonald was one of=20 Canada's leading organ soloists and church musicians. He recorded many=20=   CD's of solo organ and choral music, concertized in North America and=20 Europe where he was considered a specialist in the music of J.S. Bach.=20=   Mr. MacDonald held degrees in music from Dalhousie and McGill=20 Universities, and Diplome d'orgue from Le Conservatoire Nationale=20 Superior de Rueil-Malmaison in France, where in 1979 he was awarded a=20 Prix d'excellence. ... His cycle of the complete organ works of J.S.=20=   Bach was acclaimed as a musical landmark in Atlantic Canada, as=20 described by music critic Stephen Pedersen, "David MacDonald's great=20 devotion to Bach's music =96 no matter whether it is an orchestra or an=20=   organ that he has at his fingertips =96 make him one or our community's=20=   most creative musical resources." (November 1995 Halifax Herald) ...   He will be sorely missed.   Andrew Barss Halifax, Nova Scotia=    
(back) Subject: crescendo pedal From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 13:11:03 -0400   i'm thinking of having the stops on my instrument's crescendo pedal = reordered so i can sort of use it as another general piston. is there a = general order stops are added (besides softest to loudest, which i already = know)?   and before this settles into a discussion of how appropriate the crescendo = pedal is, depending on how much of a purist you are, let me just say that = i don't rely on it very often at all, but sometimes it does come in handy, = especially when you have only 6 generals, no memories, and stops that = decide they don't want to be a part of general #4.   scot  
(back) Subject: RE: crescendo pedal From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:12:14 -0400   Just consider your crescendo pedal to be a slow to respond, difficult to = set general piston, that feels different from the others when you engage it. AjM      
(back) Subject: Re: crescendo pedal From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:14:19 EDT   You could be French and have 8' fonds, +4' fonds, +16' fonds, + reeds, + mutations- with appropriate pedal stops and couplers corresponding. You =   can also begin with the 8' diap, and end up with full plenum, including = pedal reeds-it would be useful for hymns and works requiring organo pleno. You = could add chorus reeds and 32's with the pistons, or have string and flute registrations set on those. If you got good with it, you wouldn't even = need pistons. How many stages does the pedal have? Is there a meter? Of the two = options listed, I would prefer the later. Just don't forget to push the crescendo =   shoe back down in addition to hitting cancel when you're done! I've made = that mistake at 2 weddings! hooonnnnnnnnk!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! lol Good luck,   Grateful to have 12 generals and 99 levels! Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile <A HREF=3D"gfc234@aol.com">gfc234@aol.com</A>    
(back) Subject: RE: crescendo pedal From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:27:47 -0400   To get the most use out of it, you can also get it to pinch-hit for = missing coupler reversibles.   On at least two organs I have played, I have found that Swell-to-great = is practically the first thing engaged by the crescendo pedal. When there are no reversibles for swell-to-great (either thumb or toe), = this fact can be very useful. Just give it a slight nudge, or return it = to fully closed.   With very little experience with an adjustable crescendo pedal, I don't = know what other advice to give, except that I find the preference of = quite a few people for a wimpy crescendo sequence (such as one that = never adds reeds) to be quite inscrutable-- unless they are such purists = that they merely want to cripple it. I guess we see alike. Big on hand = registration and divisional pistons, for services I don't even use = generals very much, let alone the crescendo pedal; but there are times = when the console and the music leave one with no more practical way than = the crescendo pedal to effect a change. There is certainly no guarantee = that, in such situations, one needs to build only to a mezzo-forte. So, = aside from super and sub couplers and (on a large organ) one or two = climactic stops, my preference would be to include almost everything = eventually.      
(back) Subject: Re: crescendo pedal From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:37:21 -0400   i think i'd prefer an orchestral-type crescendo, since that's the sound = this helen-keller-of-an-organ leans toward. one lovely problem is that = there are four expression pedals (one for a non-existant echo), so the = crescendo pedal is just barely in reach. but yes, i learned many moons = ago to close it when finished!   my intention is to write down the order i'd like the stops & couplers to = engage, then have the technician do his magic, then have the church write = a check. sounds pretty simple to me. :) i just don't know the order of = what is engaged after what and before what. don't have a clue about the = number of stages. no meter -- just 5 lights that don't really help all = that much, since the 3rd & 4th lights actually go OUT before the 5th light = comes on.   scot  
(back) Subject: RE: crescendo pedal From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:47:59 -0400   Gregory Ceurvorst writes:   >You could be French and have 8' fonds, +4' fonds, +16' fonds, + reeds,=20 + mutations- with appropriate pedal stops and couplers corresponding.   Where do the mixtures come into this scheme? Whether mixtures should be = added after reeds, for the most part, or before, or among them might = well be a matter of taste or experimentation. =20   Simon Nieminski once made his preference clear: as a general rule at = least in St. Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh, "reeds before mixtures." (By = the way, where's he been lately?) As a child of the 60s, I usually = assumed the reverse, but perhaps should reconsider.      
(back) Subject: Westminster Certificate From: "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 12:51:35 -0700 (PDT)   Does anyone out there have any familiarity with the "Church Music Certificate" program at Westminster Conservatory (affiliated with the Choir College) run by John Ferguson and Craig Williams? I've sent off for the official information, but would appreciate any opinions anyone might have on the thoroughness of the ciriculum, and the certificate's usefulness as a resume-booster.   Many thanks, Tom   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Long again My actual situation (was: velocity sensitive action) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 16:27:23 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Dear Arie, Alan & List friends:   Yes, it's no good to beat at one's country. And the old wisdom that "the apples in thy neighbour's garden alway look better than your own" is = true!- And yes, I let show through some grudge and disappointment feelings that look rather strange after telling about our richness and our small but interesting organ ladscape.   Folks, I cannot tell all the backgrounds on a List which after all is devoted to organs, even when its chat topic range is so refreshingly = broad. Enough to say that we face a terrible situation here. Venezuela is a wickedly rich country indeed. But for 40 years the governments in charge pocketed in every cent of our really inmeasurable richness. Note that in Latin America governments - even "democratic labelled ones" have an almost almighty power over their countries plus economy. 89% of Venezuela's wealthiness is in the hands of 10% of the population, the so called "High class". 80% of the population lives in absolute poverty.   I degreed in 1983 and started to work in 1984. That will be 20 years yet. But at beginning of 1983 the money ran out and mid-february 1983 our = former free money exchange market was closed excepting for brief intervalls (1989-1994 and 1997-2002). No Dollars available in a country that depends from abroad for all and everything and has to import even many food (!) items despite its wealthiness!- if somebody doesn't believe me I cannot reproach it because it's so crazy.   Despite of all this I could make a decent living until 1991 and had confidence that things never would get down too much- just because of the enormous resources. In 1986 I made my Cavaille-Coll organs restorations. More organ repairs came in and things went fine. But end February 1989 the economy in Venezuela broke down definitely. Nevertheless I remained optimistic and said myself : "Gee, let's not be a runaway and hold out; I have my savings and can live through the bad times and then restart my business".   Tired of so much corruption and human abandon the people voted for an extreme leftist former putschist colonel in 1998. My friends and acquientances lost hope, started to emmigrate and advised = me to do the same. I said: "My place is in my country. What should I do in Europe or US? They have enough organ techs there. And, why, things will never go down so far; we have a bad moment, but for sure we'll improve again. And then- who will care for our historic organs?". Nevertheless I closed and rented my office since the low work volume didn't justify it.   In June 2001 I was witness how the (State managed) Music School where several of my friends and colleagues were instructors was intervened and = the Principal plus Board of Directors -which had refused to join the new = Culture & education dept. policies- was deposed in best Nazi-SS-like fashion. I = was not an instructor on this school, but helped out as "adjoined = collaborator". Three days before the scandal the Principal and the Board had awarded me with a golden button for "Exceptional Services Merits".   The shock was really bad, I tell you. This was the very moment when I started to see what's really going on in our country. Since a sabbatical year was due for me, I started to make emmigration plans. While I was abroad snooping around for an opportunity a series of 48 new, thougher laws was issued. The worst were the new "Ground property law" = which allows the government to expropiate and the people to take over "idle" properties, and the creation of government supported "Social Projects" in charge of groups which in fact are Cuban styled City Guerrillas. During = and after the failed coup d' etat attempt on April 11 2002 they gave us a = sample what they are able to do.   In the last year alone 3000 industry and commercial businesses closed = their doors. We have 30% unemployement. At Dec 1st. 2002 a general strike = started- it was intended to force the Pesident's resign like was done a year before in Argentina. The strike failed because a) 50% of the population supports the government; b) the strike wasn't well organized. Nevertheless we had a Christmas/New Year's Eve without gas and only little food- a situation I only knew from old wartime stories from my parents to this moment. Consequence: 4000 enterprises more will close down, unemployement will = raise to 38%. Our money exchange market is tightly closed; no US$ available for nobody, our credit cards are blocked outside the country by government's order. Since three months they promise to open the market "soon" but don't.   How can I import High Tech devices for pipe organs in this situation?- I cannot import even normal spare parts and have to manufacture them by my own. It's not only the money exchange problem, but the unreliable postal = and Customs services too. The only time I brought in spare parts via FedEx I = had to pay twice in taxes and extra services than the original cost of the parts. This was in 1997; right now with new tax laws and importation restrictions this would cost me even a lot more. For the same reasons I cannot buy info material from OHS catalogue or other sources. This is a grave situation since an organ tech has to remain up to date about what's new and going on in business. Outside that I am aware that I still have a lot to learn and cannot.-   Speaking of High Tech, our electric power supply 'twinkles' every few minutes. I must use TWO in serie connected power surge protectors for my = PC, and a power surge protector for the refrigerator, the fax-phone, the CD-player and the Video equipment. Right now they click and clack rhytmically as I am writing.   Two weeks ago at 5,00 pm mass power had a low in church, lights got = *orange* for ten seconds; I heard the blower motor and the power supply groan at = the inside of the (EP action) organ and the magnets of the stop action "jumped off". Back to normal the lights got so bright for a moment that we = couldn't show at them, and the action made an audible "thud". Tell me how long a sophisticated S.St. or digital sequencer, not to tell UNIT- drivers and octave couplers will last under such conditions- and who will repair them; get spare parts?   The worst is that, after so many years beeing opimistic and waiting for better times I cannot see an end of the situation. New civic actions to = get rid of the government are planned for the next week; nobody believes in their success anymore. Day after day I am more and more reminded to the = "old stories" from my relatives from Germany's Hitler aera 1933-1945; Eastern Germany's communism consolidation 1948-1951 (they could flee to W.G. in = last minute); not so old stories from cuban emmigrates about the ongoings there 1960-1963. That's 40 years right now; Celia Cruz never saw her homeland again; and here seats a servant thinking over what he can do to learn the things he has to learn and remain useful-active-productive in his = profession which in fact is a vocation... for the next 40 years? My wife -god bless her- deserves a better life too. Our income: 200 bucks = a month (at change). For Venezuela we are living fairly well; but for abroad standards we are slummers. A Janitor in the US has a better life standard than us.   Well, that's the *actual* situation. I say actual because things can = change so quickly... for better or worse; let's hope for better. And I promise I will not "beat" or complain anymore; there always are people in worse situations....... thank you for your patience with this AGEP.   Yours Andres. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Re: crescendo pedal From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:56:04 -0400   thanks, paul. i had never thought about the swell-great couple being the = first thing, but you're right... and that info can be very useful!   one instance in which a more complete crescendo pedal would have been = helpful was this past lent, when i played sowerby's 'requiescat in pace' = for the prelude. with only [about] 6 generals, most of them were taken up = for the rest of the service music (hymns, anthems, responses). most of = the divisionals were used for the first & last thirds of the sowerby, in = which less-than-usual combinations are called for (8' celestes w/ 2' = flautino, etc.). the middle third practically screams for a good = crescendo that leads all the way up to the "little glimpse of heaven". = unfortunately, i felt that with what i had to work with, i only got about = 10 miles past hell.   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: crescendo pedal From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 17:00:42 -0400   In a message dated 8/14/2003 3:47:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = PEMMONS@wcupa.edu writes:   > Where do the mixtures come into this scheme? Whether mixtures should be = added after reeds, for the most part, or before, or among them might well = be a matter of taste or > experimentation.   a former coach of mine preferred to add mixtures at the same time as 16' = stops. she said it gives a greater feeling of breadth when the pitches = expand in both directions. of course, she was talking of crescendos, and = not necessarily stating that whenever the mixtures are used that the 16s = should be also.  
(back) Subject: Re: Westminster Certificate From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 17:29:24 EDT   Tom and all,   The WCC certificate program in church music covers the basics =   for beginning church musicians. Repertoire, choral methods, organ = technique and rep., and the liturgical year and programming are all touched on. People = in the program receive individual instruction in organ from Gavin Black, a specialist in Bach and early music and past organ prof. at WCC, and = working knowledge of church music from John Ferguson. The candidates meet regularly and do a = lot of singing and attend and participate in many lectures. The program is a basic course for those interested in, beginning, and working in Sacred = Music. The certificate is viewed fairly highly amongst more traditional churches, and = is pursued by many musicians in the protestant denominations.   -Pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 17:01:43 -0500   Sounds like my kind of music! Something that stirs passions and will eventually bring in more divorce business. Of course, the text might also apply to affairs which end wintry marriages.   Thanks for the suggestion - I'll try to look that up. And thanks to all the other great suggestions too - maybe I ought to get married again myself.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Emmons, Paul     An anthem by Patrick Hadley is based on the text:   "My beloved spake and said unto me: rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For lo, the winter is past..."   This anthem is moderately paced but very festive and jubilant-- dare one say even voluptuous, with ardent crescendos. It's alost enough to make *me* want to get married :-) A completely independent organ part contributes to the effect.