PipeChat Digest #3884 - Saturday, August 16, 2003
 
Re: Partial Ranks
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Retaining the Traditions
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Celestes/Mixture pipes
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: Partial Ranks
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Question
  by "Mura Kievman" <mura@speakeasy.net>
off-topic?!
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: The annual Dutch dash (2003) part two
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Wedding Music
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: Wedding Music
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Reiger-Kloss
  by <RicVaFanMan@aol.com>
Re: Reiger-Kloss
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Wedding Music
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
RE: off-topic?! (long)
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
Re: Wedding Music
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
RE: Wedding Music
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
Another cool possibility for Weddings...
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
RE: off-topic?!
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: The annual Dutch dash (2003) part two
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Another cool possibility for Weddings...
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
Celestes, Mixtures, and Partial Partials
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Google Search
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Dan Locklair
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Dan Locklair
  by "Greg Homza" <homza@indiana.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Partial Ranks From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 07:43:42 EDT   >Bud here: >But what if the NEXT organist wants to play a Basse de Tierce, or >reinforce a Basse de Trompette with the Cornet in the bass?? Presumably >this organ will serve for at LEAST the next hundred years or so.   This is true, but I can assure you that French Classic music isn't going = to be played, except maybe a few Noels, and at 170 ranks, there's more than = enough the reinforce a Trumpet stop, should someone want to play that genre of = music down the road in a recital or something. There's six ranks of manual 8' chorus Trumpet tone, not to mention two ranks of solo Tubas (Tuben? = Tubae?), a hooded high pressure reed (under expression--playing from the Choir, also borrowed to Grand Choeur/Ch/Ped) and a Harmonic Trumpet on the Grand = Choeur, plus a Chamade in the Antiphonal. So there's plenty of trumpet tone if = necessary, not to mention the pedal Trumpet ranks from 32'-2'.   We designed the organ with future use in mind, it will have everything = that one could ever want and more. The two exciting things about the project, though, are the pastor's stated commitment to good traditional music and = the fact that while a 170 stop organ is exciting, that it's just a very small part of mind-blowing things that are happening = at the church. The church is experiencing something of better than 10% growth each year. =   The current building is just too small for all the programs, etc., so the = new church facility will be a beacon of light to the community, serving as a community center, having retirement/senior citizen/assisted living, = eventually a nursing home will be added, a hospice house for terminal illness, will = have educational programs for literacy, computers, will offer music lessons, = etc. This church was designed to be an outreach for people to spread God's love. = The organ will be a part of it, too, by offering concerts to draw people in. = So the organ and the church facility, both, have been designed to be forward looking.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Retaining the Traditions From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 06:56:20 -0500   Hello, Andres, et al: You wrote: > Regarding throwing out good old traditional stuff: this > ain't necessary, is no good for the congregation and > shouldn't happen. Regretfully this depends not only > from us church musicians but from "above" (to say: > Pastor and Board). > > When our former presbyterian church shifted to adventist > in the mid-seventies... * * * > Finally my father resigned... * * * He wasn't the only > one who left. The traditional fraction of the congregation > left too and founded a new church. * * * They managed > to blend the old with the new... * * * They made a > positive and interesting job there. I have been struggling with my feelings about "...throwing out good old traditional stuff..." and came up with this "inspired" answer to the crowd screaming for using only new ditties. To explain my answer, first let me tell you some background. I am a graduate with a Bachelor or Arts degree in Music, with about as many hours needed to hold a Masters degree. That's not too important in this discussion. I have been very active in local church and school music programs all of my life. My children and grand children are music students. My younger son is a graduate with a degree in school music teaching; emphasis on school band and orchestra. It was in the context of thinking of my younger son and his fresh start in the new school year that I came up with my point of "inspiration." We should no more expect to "throw out the old traditional stuff" in church than a band teacher should no longer play marches by Sousa and King, ...or the orchestra no long learn the music of Schubert, Beethoven, Bizet, etc. The whole notion that the traditional stuff is "boring" is really a sad commentary on how we have played than on the music itself. Yes, I am well aware of the problem of music that is so familiar that we take it so for granted that we fail to make music with it every time we assemble people for worship. When we take it for granted and render it by rote without attention to the detail that it needs to be musical, then maybe the people are justified in saying that the music is boring. I believe we have far too many people who get locked into the liturgies of our various worship styles (from fervent evangelistic styles to very reflective, meditative styles), and real music becomes difficult to hear. While I believe that the contemporary trend is wrong in its expectations, we need to continue to find ways to be "fresh" in our musical work(s) and never let it fall into such disrepair as to be "boring." Perhaps it is not the organ or organ music that is boring. Just maybe, we are at fault because we fail to render it musically. What do you think? F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Celestes/Mixture pipes From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 07:01:38 -0500   Hello, Michael: You inquired: > Can anyone educate me on how far down mixtures, partials > and celeste ranks go? Our organ at church is missing the > first octave (notes 1 - 12)... This is a common practice by organ builders. The bottom octave of a pipe rank usually is as costly or more so than the remaining pipes to the top. You have what is commonly called a Tenor C celeste, meaning that the playable notes start with the second octave from the bottom. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: RE: Partial Ranks From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 07:09:15 -0500   Monty, this is exciting news. I don=92t remember where you are =96 = sorry I=92m so muddled. Tell me again please.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of RMB10@aol.com =20 We designed the organ with future use in mind, it will have everything that one could ever want and more.=A0 The two exciting things about the project, though, are the pastor's stated commitment to good traditional music and the fact that while a 170 stop organ is exciting, that it's just a very small part of mind-blowing things that are happening at the church.   The church is experiencing something of better than 10% growth each year.=A0 The current building is just too small for all the programs, etc., so the new church facility will be a beacon of light to the community, serving as a community center, having retirement/senior citizen/assisted living, eventually a nursing home will be added, a hospice house for terminal illness, will have educational programs for literacy, computers, will offer music lessons, etc.=A0 This church was designed to be an outreach=A0for people to spread God's love.=A0 The = organ will be a part of it, too, by offering concerts to draw people in.=A0 So the organ and the church facility, both, have been designed to be forward looking.=A0=20          
(back) Subject: Re: Question From: "Mura Kievman" <mura@speakeasy.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 08:55:47 -0400   At 10:41 AM 8/15/2003 -0400, Geri wrote:   >Greetings. Am looking for a copy of the story about the organist who got >her position by playing the "National Anthem" after the pastor finished >asking for money.       The minister was preoccupied with thoughts of how he was going to, at the end of the worship service, ask the congregation to come up with more money than they were expecting for repairs to the church building. Therefore, he was annoyed to find that the regular organist was sick and = a substitute had been brought in at the last minute. The substitute wanted to know what to play.   "Here's a copy of the service," he said impatiently. "But you'll have to =   think of something to play after I make the announcement about the = finances."   During the service, the minister paused and said, "Brothers and sisters, =   we are in great difficulty; the roof repairs cost twice as much as we expected, and we need $4,000 more. Any of you who can pledge $100 or = more, please stand up."   At that moment, the substitute organist played "The Star-Spangled = Banner."   And that is how the substitute organist became the regular organist.        
(back) Subject: off-topic?! From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 08:18:32 -0500 (CDT)   I greatly appreciated seeing the letters concerning the rector and bishop in the Ft. Worth diocese. And, it is no more off-topic than discussing how we as organists are treated by the clergy. If I were the musician at that parish in Ft. Worth, I'd make sure my rabies vaccine is up-to-date! It makes me very concerned about his treatment of anyone who incurs his wrath.   What I find most hypocritical is the grave sins of action and non-action by clergy and the institutional Church which has occurred throughout history. It is naive to think it doesn't effect organists, and if it doesn't make us grieve, than shame on us. It makes some of our on-topics utter foolishness in comparison.    
(back) Subject: Re: The annual Dutch dash (2003) part two From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 09:51:52 -0400     On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 09:04:18 +0100 (BST) =3D?iso-8859-1?q?Colin=3D20Mitchell?=3D <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> writes: > The Walcker company were, of course, the pioneers of > the great German romantic organ tradition; inventing > the keg-laden or spring chest which made the German > style roll-schweller a possibility.   Collin:   A very interesting thread, but I would like to offer a small correction.   Spring chests, or federladen, were nearly always played by mechanical action with mechanical stop action, and predate the Walcker firm considerably.   Kegelladen are cone chests, referring to the shape of the pallet beneath each pipe. These chests were pneumatic in operation, and were connected to the keys via tubular or electro pneumatic devices. The stop action was not mechanical, and enabled the rollerschweller.   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Music From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 11:08:59 -0400   Now that you mention it, I remember being told that Jeremiah Clarke killed = himself because the woman he loved wouldn't marry him. Is that true? = What other ironic historical factoids should I know about before I play my = next wedding?   -WG   > "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> wrote: > > From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> > <I always point out to wedding couples that Lohengrin left the day after = the > wedding and was never seen again. That usually gets me out of playing = "Here > Comes the Bride"!> > > Unfortunately, the Trumpet Tunes and Voluntaries don't have a much = better > track record! ;-) > > Scritchies and Haruffarrroooo-bow-ha-wow... > > Unkie...    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:30:47 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2003 10:08 AM Subject: Re: Wedding Music     > Now that you mention it, I remember being told that Jeremiah Clarke = killed himself because the woman he loved wouldn't marry him. Is that true? = What other ironic historical factoids should I know about before I play my next wedding?   Indeed it was very sad. He fell in love with a nobleman's daughter, and though his feelings were reciprocated by the woman in question, her father forbade the match. Clarke was devastated and decided to end it all. He first went for a ride in the country with his manservant. He stopped = beside a tree near a lake asked his manservant to toss a coin to decide whether = to hang himself from the tree or drown himself in the lake. The coin landed = on edge, so he went home and shot himself. It so happened that the organist John Reading was passing Clarke's house at the time, heard the shot and = ran in to find Clarke dead. Incidentally, Jeremiah Clarke's cousin was = married to Maurice Greene.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Reiger-Kloss From: <RicVaFanMan@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 11:44:39 EDT   Does anyone know anything about the quality of Reiger-Kloss, and where = some are installed in the US. Thanks              
(back) Subject: Re: Reiger-Kloss From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 11:57:33 -0400   When it doubt, try Google first. Here is what you need:   http://www.rieger-kloss.com/   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com=20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: RicVaFanMan@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2003 11:44 AM Subject: Reiger-Kloss     Does anyone know anything about the quality of Reiger-Kloss, and where = some are installed in the US. Thanks                        
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Music From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 12:27:58 -0400   So, Walt...   What you are suggesting in essence is that since the Traditional Wedding = Marches are not appropriate because they are forever attached to failed and = sham marriages in their operatic context, that they are more than suitable for divorce ceremonies?   For some reason or other I can hear you saying, with a gleam in your eye, = "No, my dear, I won't play them at your wedding...but I'll have them under my = fingers for your divorce ceremony...like to schedule it now?"     -- noel jones, aago athens, tennessee, usa ------------------------------- frog music press rodgers organ users group www.frogmusic.com    
(back) Subject: RE: off-topic?! (long) From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 11:46:15 -0500   Terry, unfortunately this is one of those issues that can enflame both "sides" of it, and I fear we're in for a long ... well...debate (if = nothing else) and reactionary people like this minister makes me question him just like I do that idiot in Kansas who takes it upon himself to decide who God hates. What actually scares me MORE is that there are people who FOLLOW him, although in this case below, it doesn't sound as though many people were on his side.   I know of a church that went through two massive splits in the 1990's, = each time 1/2 of the congregation left...both over the minister that was there = at the time. He wasn't this radical, although his practices certainly not always the most Christian. The first split happened because of the minister, the second group left when he was removed. Unfortunately, that meant a lot of the active and contributing members. So a congregation = that was over 1,000 strong now has around 400. (Luckily a number of people = came back because this pastor is WONDERFUL they have now.) It is growing = again, but slowly, and they're stuck with a ~500,000 mortgage.   It's sad that it takes only one person to bring a church down, but it = isn't so much the appointment that is going to cause that. I do wonder though, = if this new bishop had been a Skinhead type, or a white supremacist, or did drugs in the 60's, would the churches be in the same uproar? Is his (perceived) sin any greater than any of our own? Than anyone's who is in prison for murder? Than the man who beats his kids and wife? Who are WE (as a whole people, not just this list) to sit in judgement?   I think people need to get a grip and look within themselves before going off the deep end and totally destroying someone's worship life. I feel badly for the lady in the letter. To keep this on topic, I find that we = as organists may need to minister to folks in the congregation as well. I = have been at least lending an ear to one of my choir members who went through a very bad divorce. Because of it, she basically was lashing out at = everyone, including the kids music groups she was leading. Pastor, our youth minister, and I decided the best thing was to put her on "hiatus" until = she was better. She is finally coming back to sing in the Praise group, and also just returned to Chancel Choir, so things are looking up! We have to be there to support our parishoners...after all, without them, we wouldn't have a purpose except to keep the pipes dusted out :)   Finally, (and David...I'm sorry if this thread becomes taboo) if this = thread is allowed to continue, I hope that we can discuss this rationally and without anyone getting offended, because it IS a hot topic and emotions = can run high. My own personal feeling is it's not for ME to say if it's right or wrong. I have my own questions, but I'll get those answered in time. Let's all stick together in our unity as fellow musicians and music = lovers. "Let there be PEACE on earth, and let it begin with ME (US)". :)   Regards to all, Jeff   > I greatly appreciated seeing the letters concerning the rector and > bishop in the Ft. Worth diocese. And, it is no more off-topic than > discussing how we as organists are treated by the clergy. If I were the > musician at that parish in Ft. Worth, I'd make sure my rabies vaccine is > up-to-date! It makes me very concerned about his treatment of anyone > who incurs his wrath.    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Music From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 12:43:24 EDT   Hello Gang:   I recently did a wedding processional with only the Zimbelstern speaking. = It certainly received a most interesting response from other organists = present. If more young people would hear those glorious tinkling bells in their marriages, there would be less divorce suits and more happy returns for = many years to come. My recessional was: ODE TO JOY! Enough said. Music during the ceremony = was played on the Harpsichord.   Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding Music From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 12:03:34 -0500   Craig, that sounds COOL! I'll have to remember this story and share it = with future brides. I'm not sure I can totally put all the stock into just the Zimbelstern as a marriage saver, but I think I know what you're saying = here.   Jeff   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Swedish5702@aol.com Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2003 11:43 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Wedding Music     Hello Gang:   I recently did a wedding processional with only the Zimbelstern = speaking. It certainly received a most interesting response from other organists present. If more young people would hear those glorious tinkling bells in their marriages, there would be less divorce suits and more happy returns for = many years to come. My recessional was: ODE TO JOY! Enough said. Music during the ceremony was played on the Harpsichord.   Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: Another cool possibility for Weddings... From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 12:12:01 -0500   OK, I know this is not the instrument of this list, but Craig's = Zimbelstern idea just made me think of another cool possibility...you could have the handbell choir do a random ring and precede the bridesmaids. I still = think I'd lean toward having an organ procession for the bride, though...just to give her a different and dignified entrance. (Not that bells aren't dignified...)   Thanks, Craig! You got me thinking outside the box! :)   Jeff    
(back) Subject: RE: off-topic?! From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 13:25:34 -0400   You wrote among other things: What I find most hypocritical is the grave sins of action and non-action by clergy and the institutional Church which has occurred throughout history. It is naive to think it doesn't effect organists, and if it doesn't make us grieve, than shame on us. It makes some of our on-topics utter foolishness in comparison. How could you express alarm when Christ explicitly forewarned us? For heaven's sake, why don't YOU do something about it beyond registering an over-repeated complaint. Christianity doesn't teach fatalism. So go to it. You can be the agent of good change if you really want to. AjM          
(back) Subject: Re: The annual Dutch dash (2003) part two From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 18:08:57 +0100 (BST)   Hello James,   Many thanks for that.   Trouble is, we have very few such devices in the UK!   Regards,   Colin   --- James R McFarland <mcfarland6@juno.com> wrote: >   > A very interesting thread, but I would like to offer > a small correction.     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Another cool possibility for Weddings... From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 13:24:10 EDT   Hi Gang:   My wildest wedding was inviting the couple into my home and listening to dear Virgil on his duo Decca release for possible tunes to play. They were so impressed with Virgil's playing they had Voice Of The = Theatre loudspeakers brought in and a large Velodyne sub and had the pro played = from those disc's. When I played live with the soft 32' bourdon and celetes and = sweet French horn I am sure Virgil was having a good laugh along with E. Power = and George Faxon. Thank heavens it was live EM Skinner and me during the ceremony. My fee = was paid in full and they have since invited me to dinner at their home = whenever I am in their area. Way to go Virgil! Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: Celestes, Mixtures, and Partial Partials From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 15:20:32 EDT   CELESTES: Full-compass undulants are desirable, but not necessarily traditional. They were NOT full-compass affairs in Cavaille-Coll organs, = even though the one body of literature that specifically calls for the Voix Celeste is = most identified with that particular builder. During the 1920s, American and Canadian instruments of high calibre = often had 61-note or 73-note undulants, but one can be surprised. I just = examined one of the worst piles of wheezing unit organ from the 1970s I had ever = NOT imagined, and lo and behold, it had a 61-note Voix Celeste (which was = nothing of the kind, but more of a broad, cardboard-sounding, neutral Viola. Some builders are now carrying undulating ranks down to 5-1/3' GG or = 6' FF, as a compromise between the ideal and the most-encountered. The bottom octave can cost as much as the remainder of the rank.   MUTATIONS and COMPOUND STOPS: The Cornet decompose on the Positif should rightly be full-compass, but sometimes, especially in a rebuild, there may = be no room; one often finds Tierces as tenor C stops because they were placed on = a vacant Tenor C toeboard on an existing soundboard. When funds and SPACE are truly limited, the bottom octave is sometimes =   sacrificed, with the assumption that the Tierce combination is more likely = to be used as a solo voice in a Chorale than as a Basse de Cornet. A builder may =   have no choice, and go for the compromise rather than forgoing it = altogether. The Grand Cornet V on the Grand-Orgue traditionally began at Middle C, =   used as harmonic glue with the Trompette and Clairon as the critical = binder for the Grand-Jeu. They are built of open pipes, with the exception of the 8' component, which is a chimney flute in almost all cases. Some builders are = now building them from G20 through G-56 (the practical limit of pipemaking and = tuning for the 17th, as well as the written limit for almost all of the = established literature). On occasion, the Cornet runs the entire length of the = keyboard, on occasion with the 8' chimney flute drawn separately. The principal-scaled Sesquialtera should also rightfully go = full-compass, if possible, since it is an important flavor in the PLENUM of the North German literature. Likewise, when third-sounding ranks are not included in = the chorus mixture, they can, if balanced a certain way, add the reedy tang of = tierce mixtures found in some English organs in the 19th and 20th centuries.   MIXTURES: You can't fake them. Mixtures have been designed by formula in various treatises, = especially plagal breaks in the manner of Dom Bedos and the like, but the composition = and break pattern of upperwork must be dictated by the room, and is NOT literature-dependent, other than considered tastes dictated by the region = and era.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Google Search From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 15:23:27 -0400   At 11:57 AM 8/16/03 -0400, Malcom wrote:   >When it doubt, try Google first. Here is what you need: > ><http://www.rieger-kloss.com/>http://www.rieger-kloss.com/   Malcom 'et al',   It seems to me that a lot of people do not know how to get to Google in = the first place.   In Canada, their URL is www.google.ca   Even if you are elsewhere, that URL will work for you.   Have fun "Googling"!   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Dan Locklair From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 19:52:02 EDT   Does anyone on the list own a recording of RUBRICS (for organ) by Dan Locklair? I bought a score when it was published in manuscript, but have = heard it is available in an engraved edition.   "The peace may be exchanged" is such a beautiful movement; a wedding = couple selected it to be "the" music being played as each of their parents were = seated today at their wedding.   I'd like to become familiar with and learn other movements of the suite. = Feel free to contact me off-line / directly about a recording. Many thanks.   Dale Rider Independence, Missouri    
(back) Subject: Re: Dan Locklair From: "Greg Homza" <homza@indiana.edu> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 19:37:27 -0500 (EST)   On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > Does anyone on the list own a recording of RUBRICS (for organ) by Dan > Locklair? I bought a score when it was published in manuscript, but have > heard it is available in an engraved edition.   It'd be worth the investment. I play movements IV and V quite a bit, and have played the whole work on a couple of recitals. It's very audience-friendly.   Dr. Marilyn Keiser, who champions (to put it mildly) Dr. Locklair's music, has recorded _Rubrics_ on Pro Organo (along with Mendelssohn 3, a couple of movements of Vierne 1, and some other good stuff). It's a very fine disc.   All best, -greg homza bloomington, IN