PipeChat Digest #3893 - Thursday, August 21, 2003
 
Boomeria
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Boomeria
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
more karg alert
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: my music download list (X-posted)
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Biggs recordings - was Bavokerk tuning
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
RE: pitch
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: my music download list (X-posted)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: pitch
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: pitch
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Mozart's perfect pitch  (Long, sorry)
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Mozart's perfect pitch  (Long, sorry)
  by "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net>
RE: Music I never heard before
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Mozart's perfect pitch
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: pitch
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Howells, Karg Elert and Reger
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: pitch
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: pitch
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Mozart's perfect pitch
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: pitch
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: pitch
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Boomeria From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 08:07:22 EDT   List,   I don't think I've spelled it correctly, but there's a guy who has a home pipe organ. I think y'all were recently talking about an upcoming concert = to be had there. The guy calls his place Boomeria - or something like that.   Please give me his URL.   Thanks, Keith    
(back) Subject: Re: Boomeria From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 08:20:59 -0400   On 8/21/03 8:07 AM, "Kzimmer0817@aol.com" <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> wrote:   > List, > > I don't think I've spelled it correctly, but there's a guy who has a = home pipe > organ. I think y'all were recently talking about an upcoming concert to = be > had there. The guy calls his place Boomeria - or something like that. > > Please give me his URL. > > Thanks, > Keith > boomeria.com http://boomeria.com/ -   Alan    
(back) Subject: more karg alert From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 08:34:24 -0400   speaking of karg alert, there's another work of his which i've been unable = to find. it's called "ideale" and it's from "poesien, opus 35" for harp & = organ. anybody know of this?   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: my music download list (X-posted) From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 09:27:30 -0400   Dear Bud,   I WOULD like to be added to your list, and would especially interested in the SATB "Unto Thee". PDF would work well for me. BUT......Please send them tot he following email addr:   DCampb1196@aol.com   *It handles attachements better*   Thanks in advance, Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 09:37:43 -0700 quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > I finally got around to clearing some of the non-working addresses. I > > just sent out "Unto Thee, O Lord" for SATB; if you think you SHOULD > be > on the list, and DIDN'T get it, please let me know. > > As I mentioned, this is a good time to join if you WANT to get on, > because I'm starting over again with Advent. > > For those who don't have a CLUE what I'm talking about (grin), I > send > out liturgical choral pieces and SAB anthems, mostly. They're free; > I > ask for donations every once in awhile; they're STRICTLY voluntary. > I'm > not a non-profit organization; I just live the REALITY (chuckle). > > Please e-mail me PRIVATELY and specify PDFs or Sibelius files. I'm > still > using Sibelius 1.4, as not everybody has upgraded. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >   ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!  
(back) Subject: Biggs recordings - was Bavokerk tuning From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 10:03:48 -0400   With all this talk of Biggs record(ing)s ...   So many of the great Biggs records I grew up with have never been issued = on CDs. Why not? They sold quite well as LPs, so why would whoever owns = them not bother? They bother with so much other schlock that seems = destined to end up in the cutout bins. As dated as some of them are, = there is a lot to be learned from them. I'd particularly like to have = "Bach in the Thomaskirche" without the needle noise. I've never found a = recording of the Passacaglia I liked better.   -WG      
(back) Subject: RE: pitch From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 10:04:01 -0400   This is why I just smile quietly to myself when someone pompously = announces to me that he has "perfect Pitch". I'll keep mine relative, = thankyouverymuch. ;-)   Ducking, WG   > "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote: > > Dear Amy, > No, A has been quite variable over the centuries. I would guess that > 300 years ago it was sheer guess work as to where the A on an organ > sat. Nor did it matter very much. Then there were several standards > from Low Pitch (A=3D412 Hz) to British Concert pitch (A=3D512 Hz I > think). Then in the 1930s the world decided to standardize on > A=3D440Hz. However some older instruments could still be low pitch or > high pitch particularly in Europe. > Hope that helps. > Bob Elms. > > ---- Original Message ---- > From: docamy@alltel.net > > >Ummmm. All this time I thought an "A" was an "A". So they decide > >what pitch > >to tune the A to? > >Amy - confused and miles behind you but ready to learn :)    
(back) Subject: Re: my music download list (X-posted) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 09:09:43 -0500   Hi Richard,   Have you tried the John Coates Jr. version of "Simple Gifts"? It is arranged for SSA and piano (there are also others), but I played the alto part on the alto recorder with the children's choir singing first soprano and the choirdirector-organist playing the organ. It sounded quite nice, or at least it would have if I hadn't been all of eleven and very nervous :)   > Hi Bud, I'd like to be on your list of music, but on one condition - > that you > don't mind if the pieces get arranged for recorder ensemble. I direct > such a > group, and we find that most of our playing opportunities are for > church > services, etc, and I'm always looking for quality music for the group > to perform.   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: RE: pitch From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 09:27:26 -0500   Perfect pitch can be a real bother, believe me. I got lost in a piece I had memorized (and I had the music in front of me) at my first harpsichord lesson. My choir thinks having perfect pitch would be wonderful, but I tell them it is a mixed blessing. You can learn the new pitches though.     > This is why I just smile quietly to myself when someone pompously > announces to me that he has "perfect Pitch". I'll keep mine relative, > thankyouverymuch. ;-) > > Ducking, > WG   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: RE: pitch From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 09:31:30 -0500   Could someone explain to me how Mozart could have had perfect pitch? Obviously instruments in an ensemble would have to be tuned to the same pitch, but wouldn't that have varied from place to place and even day to day?   > 300 years ago it was sheer guess work as to where the A on an organ > sat. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: Re: Mozart's perfect pitch (Long, sorry) From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 11:00:26 -0400   In a message dated 8/21/2003 10:31:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes:   > Could someone explain to me how Mozart could have had > perfect pitch?   He probably learned the pitches sound from his first music lessons, and = since his father was a musician, I'm sure the instruments he used were = relatively close to whatever the local standardized pitch which was in = use. I'm sure that owing to his innate musical intelligence, he was able = to quickly alter his sense of "perfect pitch" to whatever "pitch" he was = listening to.   I'm met musicians with perfect pitch (both pro and amateur) whose first = instruments were transposing ones (clarinet, trumpet, alto sax), and they = initially learned pitch names correctly for their instruments, even though = they were "wrong" according to concert pitch. Those who went into music = seriously, seemed to be able to make the mental adjustment to concert = pitch from transposed pitch. The amateurs still have to think about what = the actual concert pitch is.   One of the first people I met with perfect pitch learned clarinet in = elementary school, and switched to tenor sax in high school. As soon as = he played his first note on clarinet, he immediately remembered that pitch = as "G" (although he was actually playing a concert "F"). He just assumed = EVERYONE else heard and memorized the pitches the same way he did, and was = able to hear a song once, recognize the pitches, and play the some back = immediately. Once he realized that not everyone else did, he kept quiet = about it, thinking he was somewhat weird.   IMHO, perfect pitch is a more highly developed sense of pitch recognition, = not unlike the ability to identify colors. Many animals do not have full = color vision, since it wasn't as necessary to survival as other senses. = Other senses became more highly developed. Humans (most of them, anyway) = on the other hand, have developed the ability to identify a wide range a = colors and even to detect minute variations in hue and tint, and to = identify these variations. People with perfect pitch just have the = ability to recognize and produce pitch that most of us do not.   Also, I really wonder how true it is that perfect pitch is solely in the = domain of people "skilled" or "gifted" in the art of music. I wonder how = many non-musical people have it, but don't realize that they have a sense = which is not common. If they've never had any real musical training, how = do they know that they hear things "differently" from everyone else.   Lastly, for years I've been seeing the ads in music magazines about a = program which claims it can develop perfect pitch in the learner. I've = never met anyone who used this program, but the ads still appear. Has = anyone here ever met anyone who tried this program??   Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: Mozart's perfect pitch (Long, sorry) From: "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 10:27:21 -0500   >>and was able to hear a song once, recognize the >>pitches, and play the some back immediately.   But you don't need perfect pitch to be able to do that--just a keen = sense of musical intervals. It's generally called "playing by ear", = which many without perfect pitch can do readily. It's a sense that can = probably be sharpened by studying scales--in all the modes.              
(back) Subject: RE: Music I never heard before From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 16:31:17 +0100 (BST)   Hello Andres,   Many thanks for the kind comments and the details about Torres.   If I can quote from the CD notes supplied, they read:-   "Torres was chapelmaster of Seville Cahedral. He composed organ works and masses. The well known Spanish composer Joaquin Turina was one of his pupils. In the four Saetas, the second and fourth of which are heard on the CD, one finds traces of Andalusian Folk and Gypsy music.   A Saeta is a short poem based on the spontaneous song of the gypsies during the Holy Week processions in Seville. Torres transforms this poetry into miniature synphonic poems in a striking manner.   The refined tonal language is on the border betwen late romantic and early modern music."   I have certainly been impressed by the beauty and elegance of the writing, and perhaps I will investigate the music further.   I have much catching up to do after my vacation, but I want you to know that I haven't forgotten about the Cavaille-Coll LP I promised to send you.   Did you see the awful state of the Caville-Coll organ in the web site I posted?   I was quite angry about it.   Regards,   Colin     Andr=E9s G=FCnther <agun@telcel.net.ve> wrote: > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.net.ve > > Wow, what a program- thanks for sharing this > terrific experience with us! >     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Mozart's perfect pitch From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 11:36:46 -0400   Richard: Your carefully thought out post on perfect pitch is in perfect accord with my own thoughts. Thanks for "codifying" my own perceptions. When I was a kid, I noticed that my mother had the ability to identify pitches; when I'd hit a wrong key at the piano, she'd say, "No! F-SHARP!" When I asked, she said she had perfect pitch. It was incomprehensible to me, so quite often I would hit a key on the piano, and ask her to identify it. She gave immediate replies, and always correct ones. Drove me nuts with envy. (She was an alto and a pianist, but of no more than what was standard middle-American education in such things in those days.)   Alan   On 8/21/03 11:00 AM, "ContraReed@aol.com" <ContraReed@aol.com> wrote:   > He [Mozart] probably learned the pitches' sounds from his first music = lessons, > and since his father was a musician, I'm sure the instruments he used = were > relatively close to whatever the local standardized pitch which was in = use. > I'm sure that owing to his innate musical intelligence, he was able to = quickly > alter his sense of "perfect pitch" to whatever "pitch" he was listening = to. > > I'm met musicians with perfect pitch (both pro and amateur) whose first > instruments were transposing ones (clarinet, trumpet, alto sax), and = they > initially learned pitch names correctly for their instruments, even = though > they were "wrong" according to concert pitch. Those who went into music > seriously, seemed to be able to make the mental adjustment to concert = pitch > from transposed pitch. The amateurs still have to think about what the = actual > concert pitch is. > > One of the first people I met with perfect pitch learned clarinet in > elementary school, and switched to tenor sax in high school. As soon = as he > played his first note on clarinet, he immediately remembered that pitch = as "G" > (although he was actually playing a concert "F"). He just assumed = EVERYONE > else heard and memorized the pitches the same way he did, and was able = to hear > a song once, recognize the pitches, and play the some back immediately. = Once > he realized that not everyone else did, he kept quiet about it, thinking = he > was somewhat weird. > > IMHO, perfect pitch is a more highly developed sense of pitch = recognition, not > unlike the ability to identify colors. Many animals do not have full = color > vision, since it wasn't as necessary to survival as other senses. Other > senses became more highly developed. Humans (most of them, anyway) on = the > other hand, have developed the ability to identify a wide range a colors = and > even to detect minute variations in hue and tint, and to identify these > variations. People with perfect pitch just have the ability to = recognize and > produce pitch that most of us do not. > > Also, I really wonder how true it is that perfect pitch is solely in the > domain of people "skilled" or "gifted" in the art of music. I wonder = how many > non-musical people have it, but don't realize that they have a sense = which is > not common. If they've never had any real musical training, how do they = know > that they hear things "differently" from everyone else. > > > Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: pitch From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 08:56:39 -0700   Kathleen Battle and I were classmates at Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati; prior to her debut, she was my soprano soloist for eight years at Old St. Mary's RC Church in Cincinnati, where the 1928 Austin was tuned to something weird like A=3D438. Kathy HAS perfect pitch, but it's A=3D440, and singing with the organ used to drive her CRAZY, since it wasn't exactly a half-step transposition she could make in her head (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   Alicia Zeilenga wrote: > Perfect pitch can be a real bother, believe me. I got lost in a piece I =   > had memorized (and I had the music in front of me) at my first > harpsichord lesson. My choir thinks having perfect pitch would be > wonderful, but I tell them it is a mixed blessing. You can learn the = new > pitches though. > > > >>This is why I just smile quietly to myself when someone pompously >>announces to me that he has "perfect Pitch". I'll keep mine relative, >>thankyouverymuch. ;-) >> >>Ducking, >>WG > > > Alicia Zeilenga > Sub-Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Howells, Karg Elert and Reger From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 17:20:18 +0100 (BST)   I am partial to a bit of Howells - the Psalm Preludes work well on a romantic organ - maybe St Bavo's too - but a little Karg Elert goes a long way. Nun Danket was a boyhood enthusiasm of mine - when I eventually got to play the organ for our school chapel services my first voluntary was Nun Danket. I still like it, and he did write a very beautiful piece for violin and organ, though its name escapes me at the moment. Maybe it had a choir in it too? Barry Rose performed it some years ago (about 40!) to good effect on the BBC, I think from St Andrew's, Kingsbury. Reger well played is exciting stuff - but there are an awful lot of notes to learn! "How Brightly Shines the Morning Star" is my favourite of the choral fantasias, and a good piece is the Toccata and Fugue in D minor and Major. I haven't played it/them for years, I think they are two separate but adjacent pieces in a book of his shorter pieces I once had. In fact I have mislaid my copy - but this discussion may well lead to my replacing it. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: RE: pitch From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 11:29:27 -0500   If the standard for A was tuned at a lower pitch during the past 300 years, than would it be fair to assume that music written during that time period, and performed today using the original score, would sound higher today?   David E   David Evangelides International Bible Society Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 16:32:55 +0800 Subject: RE: pitch   > Dear Amy, > No, A has been quite variable over the centuries. I would guess that > 300 years ago it was sheer guess work as to where the A on an organ > sat. Nor did it matter very much. Then there were several standards > from Low Pitch (A=3D412 Hz) to British Concert pitch (A=3D512 Hz I > think). Then in the 1930s the world decided to standardize on > A=3D440Hz. However some older instruments could still be low pitch or > high pitch particularly in Europe. > Hope that helps. > Bob Elms. > > ---- Original Message ---- > From: docamy@alltel.net > To: pipechat@pipechat.org, > Subject: RE: pitch > Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 20:53:24 -0500 > > >Ummmm. All this time I thought an "A" was an "A". So they decide > >what pitch > >to tune the A to? > >Amy - confused and miles behind you but ready to learn :) > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > >topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: pitch From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 12:50:18 -0400   On 8/20/03 9:53 PM, "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> wrote:   > Ummmm. All this time I thought an "A" was an "A". So they decide what = pitch > to tune the A to? > Amy - confused and miles behind you but ready to learn :) > Amy:   Go to   http://www.uk-piano.org/history/pitch.html   And then to   http://www.flute-net.com/flute-info/articles/pitch.htm   You'll come away dizzy with new information.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Mozart's perfect pitch From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 12:54:49 -0400   cGVyZmVjdCBwaXRjaCBtZWFucyB0aGUgYWJpbGl0eSB0byBpZGVudGlmeSBhIGdpdmVuIHBp dGNoIHdpdGhvdXQgcmVmZXJlbmNlIHRvIG90aGVyIHBpdGNoZXMsIGFuZC9vciBiZWluZyBh YmxlIHRvIHByb2R1Y2UgYSBnaXZlbiBwaXRjaCB3aXRob3V0IHJlZmVyZW5jZSB0byBvdGhl ciBwaXRjaGVzLiAgaW4gb3RoZXIgd29yZHMsIGlmIGkgd2FrZSB1cCBhbmQgZ28gdGhyb3Vn aCB0aGUgbW9ybmluZyB3aXRob3V0IGhlYXJpbmcgYW55IG11c2ljYWwgcGl0Y2hlcyAobGlr ZSBmcm9tIHRoZSByYWRpbyksIGFuZCBzb21lb25lIHdhbGtzIHVwIHRvIG1lIGFuZCBzYXlz LCAiZ2l2ZSBtZSBhbiBlLWZsYXQiLCB0aGVuIGkgY2FuIGRvIHNvIGFjY3VyYXRlbHkuICBo b3dldmVyLCBpZiBpJ3ZlIGp1c3QgbGlzdGVuZWQgdG8gYSBjb25jZXJ0byB3aGljaCBpIGtu b3cgdG8gYmUgaW4gdGhlIGtleSBvZiBHLCBhbmQgc29tZW9uZSBhZnRlcndhcmRzIGFza3Mg bWUgdG8gZ2l2ZSBhbiBlLWZsYXQgYW5kIGkgZG8gc28gYWNjdXJhdGVseSwgYWxsIHRoYXQg cHJvdmVzIGlzIHRoYXQgaSBoYXZlIHJlbGF0aXZlIHBpdGNoLCBzaW5jZSBpJ20gYWJsZSB0 byBnaXZlIGFuIGUtZmxhdCBieSByZW1lbWJlcmluZyB0aGUgaW50ZXJ2YWwgYmV0d2VlbiBp dCBhbmQgdGhlIHRvbmljIG9mIEcsIHdoaWNoIHByZXN1bWFibHkgdGhlIGNvbmNlcnRvIGVu ZGVkIG9uLCBhbmQgaXMgc3RpbGwgcmF0dGxpbmcgYXJvdW5kIGluIG15IGJyYWluLgoKaG93 ZXZlciwgaSdtIGEgbXVzaWNpYW4sIHVubGlrZSBjaGV2eSBjaGFzZSB3aG8gaGFzIHBlcmZl Y3QgcGl0Y2guICBoZSBjYW4gZ2l2ZSBhbiBlLWZsYXQgYWZ0ZXIgaGVhcmluZyBhIEcgbWFq b3IgY29uY2VydG8gYmVjYXVzZSBoZSBkb2Vzbid0IGtub3cgd2hhdCBrZXkgdGhlIGNvbmNl cnRvIGlzIGluLCBidXQgaGUgaXMgc3RpbGwgYWJsZSB0byBpZGVudGlmeSBpdHMga2V5LCBh cyB3ZWxsIGFzIGFuIGUtZmxhdCBvdXQgb2YgdGhlIGJsdWUuCgpub3cgaGVyZSdzIHNvbWV0 aGluZyBpIHdhcyB0b2xkIGluIGdyYWQgc2Nob29sIGNvbmNlcm5pbmcgcGVyZmVjdCBwaXRj aCAtLSBpZiBhbiBvcmNoZXN0cmFsIGluc3RydW1lbnRhbGlzdCBoYXMgcGVyZmVjdCBwaXRj aCwgaXQncyB1c3VhbGx5IHBlcm1hbmVudC4gIGJ1dCBpZiBhIGtleWJvYXJkaXN0IGhhcyBw ZXJmZWN0IHBpdGNoLCBpdCB0ZW5kcyB0byBjb21lIGFuZCBnby4gIHRoZSB0aGVvcnkgYmVo aW5kIHRoaXMgaXMgdGhhdCBhbiBvcmNoZXN0cmFsIGluc3RydW1lbnRhbGlzdCBjYW4gaWRl bnRpZnkgdGhlIGFjdHVhbCBwaXRjaGVzIGJlY2F1c2UgdGhleSBhcmUgYWJsZSB0byBwbGF5 IHBpdGNoZXMgbW9yZSBhY2N1cmF0ZWx5LCB3aGVyZWFzLCBhIGtleWJvYXJkaXN0IHBsYXlz IChhbG1vc3QgYWx3YXlzKSBpbiBlcXVhbCB0ZW1wZXJhbWVudC4gIGluIG90aGVyIHdvcmRz LCBhIEcgcGxheWVkIGFzIHRoZSB0aGlyZCBvZiBhbiBlLWZsYXQgY2hvcmQgd2lsbCBiZSBz bGlnaHRseSBoaWdoZXIgdGhhbiBhIEcgcGxheWVkIGFzIHRoZSBmaWZ0aCBvZiBhIEMgbWFq b3IgY2hvcmQuICB0aGUgcmVhc29uaW5nIGlzIHRoYXQgdGhpcyB2YXJpYW5jZSBpcyB3aGF0 IGdpdmVzIGVhY2gga2V5IGl0cyAiZmxhdm9yIiAoRS1mbGF0IGlzIHRoZSBrZXkgb2YgbWFq ZXN0eSwgRC1mbGF0IGlzIHRoZSBrZXkgb2YgdGhlIGVhcnRoLCBldGMuKSwgYW5kIGlzIHRo ZXJlZm9yZSBlYXNpZXIgdG8gaWRlbnRpZnkgaWYgdGhlIHBlcnNvbiB3aXRoIHBlcmZlY3Qg cGl0Y2ggaXMgYW4gb3JjaGVzdHJhbCBpbnN0cnVtZW50YWxpc3QuICBpIGNvbmZlc3MgdGhh dCBhcyBhbiBvcmdhbmlzdCBzb21ldGltZXMgaSBjYW4gaGVhciBhIHBpZWNlIG9mIG11c2lj IHRoYXQncyBuZXcgdG8gbWUgYW5kIGlkZW50aWZ5IHRoZSB2ZXJ5IGZpcnN0IGNob3JkIHdp dGhvdXQgaGVzaXRhdGlvbiBhbmQgd2l0aG91dCBhIHByaW9yIHBpdGNoIHJlZmVyZW5jZSwg YW5kIG90aGVyIHRpbWVzIGkgZG9uJ3QgaGF2ZSBhIGNsdWUgd2hhdCBrZXkgc29tZXRoaW5n IGlzIGluLgoKZG8gYW55IG90aGVycyBldmVyIGV4cGVyaWVuY2UgdGhpcz8KCnNjb3QK  
(back) Subject: Re: pitch From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 12:55:40 -0400   In a message dated 8/21/2003 12:29:27 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = davide@theatreorgans.com writes:   > If the standard for A was tuned at a lower pitch during the past 300 > years, than would it be fair to assume that music written during that > time period, and performed today using the original score, > would sound higher today?   Yup. This is especially prevalent in the early music community. Many = recorder players have to have recorder at both modern pitch (440) and low = pitch (415), in order to "accurately" perform some pieces. (Although = there is speculation that some pitch levels are higher than what we're = used to now). Viol da gamba players likewise keep 2 sets of instruments - = they feel that a constant tuning up and down of strings and pitch level = has a detrimental effect on their instruments. Harpsichord players only = have to move their keyboards (or however that works) one string over to = switch between A=3D440 or 415.   Somewhere there is a Bach cantata (?) in which one of the woodwind = instruments (oboe, taille???) looks like it has a rather unusual = transposition. I believe it was because the instrument was from another = town in which the pitch center was different, and Bach had to write the = part so it would work with his organ.   Strings players traveling to different towns to play had it relatively = easy, since all they had to do to match the pitch of the organ was tune = their strings to it (their own perfect pitch not-withstanding). Brass = players could do the same thing with crooks and slides. But the woodwind = players (esp. flute & oboe)had to have instruments with several different = sized body parts to be able to raise or lower their pitch to match = different organs.   Getting back to early music, many recorder and gamba players prefer to = play at 415 because they feel it gives the music a sense of being more = laid back and relaxed at the lower pitch. Recorderists can try to play = this stuff a half-step lower, but that leads to really awkward key = signatures, and the 415 instruments just seem to sound better at that = pitch.  
(back) Subject: Re: pitch From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 13:08:04 -0400   On 8/21/03 12:29 PM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > would it be fair to assume that music written during that time period, = and > performed today using the original score, would sound higher today?   Surely so, unless you used an instrument deliberately tuned low rather = than an A440 instrument.   Alan