PipeChat Digest #3896 - Friday, August 22, 2003
 
Re: perfect pitch
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Virus Alert
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Virus Alert
  by "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org>
ALL READ!  Re: Virus Alert
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Virus Warning - Sorry
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Pitch question
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
music list 24Aug03
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: Pitch question
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: "Perfect" Pitch
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
Re: Pitch question
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Pitch question
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
barber's adagio
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Pitch question
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: perfect pitch
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
Re: Classic recordings (was:Bach's Passacaglia)
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Revised list of pitch associations
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
(Long) Pitches - perfect and non perfect
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: Biggs recordings
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Pitch question
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Disney Hall (was: NYTimes.com Article)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: perfect pitch
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: perfect pitch From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 06:41:56 EDT   In a message dated 8/21/2003 7:12:41 PM Eastern Standard Time, Swedish5702@aol.com writes:   > I am sure you will agree it is the same as listening or playing a = digital > vs. all pipe organ. >   digitials remain pretty constant------   dale    
(back) Subject: Virus Alert From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 08:06:41 EDT   List,   Attached is a copy of an e-mail I received from a cousin in Minnesota. I, =   too have recently received some messages about bounced e-mails coming from = me that I never sent. I did find the file he mentioned on my computer, but, = when viewing the properties, it appears to be a legitimate Microsoft program. = I've scanned it with Norton Antivirus and it comes out clean. Anyway, y'all = might want to check your computers. ----------------- Keith   Subject: Virus Alert   Unfortunately a virus has been passed on to me by a contact. My address book was infected. Since you are in my address book, there is a good chance you will find it in your computer too. My sincere apologies for this inconvenience. The virus (called jdbgmgr.exe) is not detected by Norton or McAfee antivirus systems. The virus sits quietly for 14 days before damaging the system. It is sent automatically by messenger and by the address book, whether or not you sent e-mail to your contacts. Here's how to check for the virus and how to get rid of it:   YOU MUST DO THIS   1. Go to Start, Find or search option.   2. In the file folder option, type the name jdbgmgr.exe   3. Be sure you search your C: drive and all subfolders and any other drives you may have. I found mine in "My Computer"   4. Click 'find now'   5. The virus has a Teddy Bear icon with the name jdbgmgr.exe DO NOT OPEN IT   6. Go to Edit (on the menu bar) and choose 'select all' to highlight the file without opening it.   7. Now go to File (on the menu bar) and select delete. It will then go to the Recycle Bin. Then empty the recycle bin!   8. IF YOU FIND THE VIRUS YOU MUST CONTACT ALL THE PEOPLE IN YOUR ADDRESS BOOK, SO THEY CAN ERADICATE IT IN THEIR OWN ADDRESS BOOKS.   To do this:   a) Open a new e-mail message b) Click the icon of the address book next to the 'TO' c) Highlight every name and add to 'BCC' (which means blind copy) so that every name gets a message addressed to that name only) d) Copy this message and paste to e-mail   I have followed these directions sent by someone to me - the virus was on my C drive - and I was able to easily delete it.   Apologies to all!   Steve    
(back) Subject: Re: Virus Alert From: "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 22:45:46 +1000   > Anyway, y'all might want to check your computers.   Don't ON ANY ACCOUNT follow this advice. This, as many of you will know, is a hoax - the file jdbgmgr.exe is part of the Windows operating system.   -- Regards, Roger   Roger Brown roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org http://rogerbrown.no-ip.org http://member.melbpc.org.au/~robrown/    
(back) Subject: ALL READ! Re: Virus Alert From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 07:54:30 -0500   Folks   Please remember that only Tim or I, was the List Administrators, are to post anything about viruses running around on the Net. If you have something that you feel should be posted about a virus send it to us at this Administration address. We will make the determination about the information and if we feel it is necessary will post it to the list.   Meanwhile, i just want to insure al of you that the PipeChat server cannot send out viruses. The Rejection file for the server has all the details, both Subject lines and also Attachment types that these viruses use in that file. So anything that attempts to be sent to the PipeChat list by these viruses will be rejected.   However, that doesn't mean that the PipeChat list address hasn't been "spoofed" by some infected machine. If you get ANYTHING that is supposedly sent by PipeChat and has any type of attachment with it TRASH it IMMEDIATELY. The PipeChat server is set not to allow any attachments so it you get something from PipeChat with an attachment it is a bogus email.   Supposedly, I, from my personal account, have sent out the virus which of course was not the case. Actually, i got an email this morning from one of my bosses that I had sent out the virus. Both he and I know that isn't the case but he was just letting me know that my address was being spoofed. I "supposedly" also sent the virus to the PIPORG-L list last night. Again, this is the spoofing of my address by someone's computer that is infected. SO please be careful with ANY email you have gotten. If it has an attachment and has one of the Subject lines that I put in my note to the list last night TRASH it, even if it is from someone whose address you would normally trust. This is what the virus author is depending on to propagate that virus, that people will open the email based on it being from someone that they normally think of as being "safe"   Again, I refer you to the Symantec Web Site for more information and removal tools for this virus. http://www.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/w32.sobig.f@mm.html   PLEASE practice safe computing!   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Virus Warning - Sorry From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 09:16:55 EDT   List,   ContraReed e-mailed me:   "The file you found is NOT a virus, it is a part of the Windows operating system. Mine has been in my computer for over 5 years and has never = caused any problems. Please inform everyone to whom you sent this warning (as well = as your cousin) that this "warning" is bogus.   "And in the future, please check with the list-owner/moderator before = sending any such warnings to a list-serv." ---------------------------- I also noticed that the "properties" of the particular program appeared to = be a legitimate Microsoft program. I have asked my cousin to recheck his sources.   I hope nobody was offended at my warning as Mr. ContraReed said. I will = say that there's a great deal of "junk" posted to this list that probably = doesn't get expressed permission from the owners. So, if somebody else wants to = "get onto me" for trying to alert people to info that's a little more specific = than what was on someone's previous message, please keep the admonishment to yourself.   Sorry for the "misguided" warning. Keith      
(back) Subject: Pitch question From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 09:22:22 -0400   How does one account for the supposedly distinctive characteristics of certain keys in the opinions of certain composers? I don't have any specific examples at hand, but surely you have heard of this. C Major as bright, D-flat major as dark, and so forth. It's clearly not a function = of the pitches themselves, as they fluctuate over the centuries. Is it a function of the well-tempered scale, and the slight differences between certain intervals in one key and the same intervals in another? But then = it would only work in a well-tempered context. I imagine there must be scholarly articles addressing this subject. Anyone know of any?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: music list 24Aug03 From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 09:54:33 -0400   Here's my music list for the coming Sunday, together with a note for the bulletin. Anyone know Boellmann's Intermezzo (a charming duet for trumpet and flute) and Homilius's two settings for Der am Kreuz which are actually not for that tune as it is known in the Lutheran Book of Worship, but for Jesu bleibet meine Freunde?         August 24, 2003 Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio Moller 3/54 1934   Prelude: Intermezzo Leon Boellmann Hymn: Praise to the Lord, the Almighty Solo: Poor Wayfarin' Stranger arr. Charles Lloyd, Jr. Paula Dabbelt, soprano Hymn: Just a Closer Walk with Thee Offertory: Jesu, Joy Gottfried August Homilius Hymn: On Eagles=B9 Wings (aargh! pure pandering to the multitude on my part= ) Postlude: Carillon L=E9on Boellmann     Piping Up (notes from the music director)   The title Homilius actually gave today=B9s offertory is =B3Der am Kreuz ist meine Liebe=B2--=B3Him on Yonder Cross I Love.=B2 Hymn number 102 in the Luthera= n Book of Worship bears that tune=B9s name, but is not the tune Homilius was using. Instead, I find that he based his chorale prelude on the tune we know today as =B3Jesu, Joy of Man=B9s Desiring.=B2 This tune appears in the LBW as number 219. There are two aspects you may remember from =8CJesu, Joy,=B2 which is often played at weddings and has even made its way into television commercials. One is the flowing melody in the accompaniment; the other is the chorale tune (from Bach=B9s cantata number 147), which does not make its presence known until several lines into the piece. Homilius is only using the second of these two aspects, the chorale tune. He wrote two settings o= f it, and I will play the other one for next Sunday=B9s offertory. In today=B9s offertory, it is clearly there in the opening measures, and is most prominent again on the trumpet stop played in the pedal at the end. I invite you to listen for it. Perhaps it might be a little like staring at = a stained-glass window until the story it tells comes into focus. It is interesting, by the way, that =B3Jesu, Joy,=B2 which is today such a permanent fixture in our popular culture, was practically unknown until 1926, when British pianist Dame Myra Hess published an arrangement for piano. Its lilting serenity appealed to a wide audience, and it became an immense hit. L=E9on Boellmann=B9s =B3Carillon,=B2 like other pieces with the same title from the pen of other composers, is meant to evoke the joyful peal of church bells. Boellmann builds his music over a repeating three-note pattern in the bass (do, mi, re) that could be the three bells of a particular church tower. Zion=B9s bells, as I recall, are also three in number, but not these three.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: RE: Pitch question From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 22:09:00 +0800   I have noticed this for many years but have no explanation for the phenomenon. I remember a Superintendent of Music over 60 years ago in my first school as a teacher, using a scale (tonic solfa) and each of the notes had a hand signal that indicated the "mood" of that note in the scale.   I noticed too that the writers of evangelical mission music in the 19th Century wrote some music that had deeply religious atmosphere in the keys of Db major , Ab major, or sometimes Gb major (Hark, my soul it is the Lord, etc.). I believe they did this quite deliberately to capture the feeling of that key. Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings to me has the same sort of atmosphere. I haven't got the score here but I believe it is in either Db major or Gb major. I don't think these hymns in those keys would sound very good in mean tone temperament!!   Don't tell me I'm crazy. I have been like this for a very long time!!!! Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: runyonr@muohio.edu To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: RE: Pitch question Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 09:22:22 -0400   >How does one account for the supposedly distinctive characteristics >of certain keys in the opinions of certain composers? I don't have any >specific examples at hand, but surely you have heard of this. C >Major as bright, D-flat major as dark, and so forth. It's clearly not a >function of the pitches themselves, as they fluctuate over the centuries. Is it function of the well-tempered scale, and the slight differences >between certain intervals in one key and the same intervals in another? But then it would only work in a well-tempered context. I imagine there must be scholarly articles addressing this subject. Anyone know of any? > > >Randy Runyon >    
(back) Subject: Re: "Perfect" Pitch From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:16:14 EDT   Hi Gang:   When I was studying the great works of the church in Boston, my coach = would break away from what we were doing and would make me sight read Opera = works and to hear those charts on a huge EM Skinner instrument was thrilling. So = was his playing Ellington charts.   I can't say that he had perfect pitch...yet he was a perfectionist. My having the gift of perfect pitch both helped and hurt my musical training. = LOL!   Best, Craig   swedish5702@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Pitch question From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:20:18 -0400   On 8/22/03 9:22 AM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > I imagine there must be scholarly articles addressing this subject. = Anyone > know of any?   I've puzzled over that for 55 years or more, and heard a lot of theories. "A Mighty Fortress" in C is nothing like itself in D. And, weirdly = enough, I'll bet it's a lot different in D-sharp than in E-flat! Is it totally psychological? Does an a cappella choir go flat in D-flat, but not (or = less so) in C-sharp? Does it have anything to do with our fallen state since Eden?   If you find any answers, I hope you'll share them.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Pitch question From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:25:37 -0400   Thanks, Bob, for your reply. That's a very interesting point about evangelical mission hymns. I wonder if hymn writers today pay similar attention to their choice of keys. Perhaps not, as the determining factor now seems to be singability, with some hymnal editors transposing some = hymns down.     I found a discussion thread on this topic at http://www.glenngould.org/mail/archives/f_minor/msg01208.html as well as: http://www.melbay.com/creativekeyboard/jan03/colors.html At the latter, the following associations are proposed: [Gail Smith writes:] Each key has peculiar characteristics. Beethoven selected the key of E for the Heroic Symphony and the key of F for the Pastoral Symphony. There is a mysterious law that some suspect assigns = each key to a color of the rainbow. In the book Music and Musicians written by Albert Lavignac in 1905, he describes each key this way: B Major: Energetic E Major: Radiant, warm, joyous A Major: Frank, sonorous D Major: Joyful, brilliant, alert G Major: Rural, merry C Major: Simple, naive, commonplace F Major: Pastoral, rustic B Major: Noble and elegant, graceful E Major: Vigorous, chivalrous A Major: Gentle, caressing, or pompous D Major: Charming, suave, placid G Major: Gentle and calm G# minor: Very sombre C# minor: Brutal, sinister, or very sombre (Chopin's Prelude in C# minor)   By the way, Albert Lavignac (1846-1916) rates this brief mention in John Henderson's Directory of Composers for Organ: "writer and theorist at the Paris Conservatoire, mostly published piano music. He contributed a = Prelude in C to bk. 4 of Les Maitres Contemporains de l'Orgue 1912."     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: barber's adagio From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:33:10 EDT   barber's adagio is in B-flat minor. it ends on the dominant (F major).  
(back) Subject: Re: Pitch question From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:35:40 EDT   In a message dated 8/22/03 7:26:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:   << There is a mysterious law that some suspect assigns each key to a color of the rainbow. In the book Music and Musicians written by Albert Lavignac in 1905, he describes each key this way: B Major: Energetic E Major: Radiant, warm, joyous A Major: Frank, sonorous D Major: Joyful, brilliant, alert G Major: Rural, merry C Major: Simple, naive, commonplace F Major: Pastoral, rustic B Major: Noble and elegant, graceful E Major: Vigorous, chivalrous A Major: Gentle, caressing, or pompous D Major: Charming, suave, placid G Major: Gentle and calm G# minor: Very sombre C# minor: Brutal, sinister, or very sombre (Chopin's Prelude in C# minor) >>   some are on here twice. are there supposed to be some flat signatures?  
(back) Subject: Re: perfect pitch From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:38:27 EDT   Dale:   My point was that the mighty pipe organ doesn't stay in tune while the digital organ does.   Having perfect pitch helps me to know when a pipe is ready to speak on = its own and go yank it as it has what George Wright used to say it has trash = in it. LOL! George Faxon had another word for it. LOL!   While listening or playing a digital instrument it doesn't fail you until =   you smell smoke and then it is too late. LOL!   Have a good one.   Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: Re: Classic recordings (was:Bach's Passacaglia) From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:49:08 -0400   I'll jump in an add three of my absolute favorites, from memory so forgive = my boo-boos:   From the cutout bins of the mid 1970s - Modern French Organ Music - I = think it was Xavier Darasse and Andre Isoir at St. Etiene du Mont or St. = Sernin, but it had wonderful, and for me definititive, performances of the = Messiaen Transports and the Durufle P&F on ALAIN. I wore out 3 copies.   Poulenc organ concerto and Gloria with Durufle at the organ and George = Pretre conducting. Engineering could have been better, but not the = performances.   Saint Saens Symphony #3 with Leonard Raver and Bernstein/NYPO - In my = humble opinion, no other conductor ever, ever, ever got this one right.     > "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > > Hello, > > Isn't it strange how some recordings just leap off the > vinyl or plastic? > > There are so FEW outstanding recordings, and somehow, > they gain almost universal acceptance as the standard > when they are realeased.    
(back) Subject: Revised list of pitch associations From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 10:50:16 -0400   on 8/22/03 10:35 AM, BlueeyedBear@aol.com at BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote:   > some are on here twice. are there supposed to be some flat signatures?   Yes, apparently the flats didn't come through. Sorry. Here's the revised version:   > > B Major: Energetic > E Major: Radiant, warm, joyous > A Major: Frank, sonorous > D Major: Joyful, brilliant, alert > G Major: Rural, merry > C Major: Simple, naive, commonplace > F Major: Pastoral, rustic > B flat Major: Noble and elegant, graceful > E flat Major: Vigorous, chivalrous > A flat Major: Gentle, caressing, or pompous > D flat Major: Charming, suave, placid > G flat Major: Gentle and calm > G# minor: Very sombre > C# minor: Brutal, sinister, or very sombre (Chopin's Prelude in C# > minor) >>     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: (Long) Pitches - perfect and non perfect From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 11:30:09 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Greetings, and congrats to this instructive thread.   I have the "perfect pitch" (at last I know the correct English term for that!) and believe me, it's a mixed gift. It's great when I have to tune = (or give the pitch to the choir) and forgot my tuning fork or maschine :) but a heck when it comes to transposition (accompaning). I tolerate variations up to a 1/4 tone up or down, but from 1/4 tone+ on... = oh boy. I never can use a transposing device because I get nuts and must transpose all "by hand". Fun starts when I must transpose from a minor to = g sharp minor...   Note that the "perfect pitch" is an ability to store a given pitch in your brain permanently (BTW it's a recessive heritable ability). In my case = it's the a'=3D440Hz that is "stored" in my brain because my piano is tuned in = this pitch since I took my first lessons. But somebody with this ability who lived in other time and learned / listened to music in the standard pitch of HIS time (f.e. a'=3D 415) would have gone nuts playing on a 440 Hz tuned instrument.   Different pitches on different instruments: Our older pipe organs are = tuned at a'=3D 440; modern ones at a' =3D445 HZ. One of them is a chest organ = from a 1-A german builder that was bought for rental. It now stands unused in a corner for the most time because so many groups in Caracas play with historic (or replicas of historic) instruments which have an a'=3D 415 = pitch! Regretfully nobody thought about this detail and told the builder to = include a transposer. Only our symphonic orchestra (which plays at 445 Hz) rents = it from time to time.   The worst problem was to explain to the clients that an organ *cannot* be raised or lowered in pitch. Its pipes were scaled, voiced and cut to a specific pitch, and period. When we tune an organ we do not perform but micro-adjustments. But if we attempt to raise or lower the pitch we change the whole pipe scale de facto (lowering the pitch the scale becomes narrower, raising the pitch it becomes wider); and with that the whole = sound is altered, it becomes dull (lowering) or screaming (raising)... to name only the two most noticeable parameters. Outside of that we must cut off = the pipes which is (at least for me) an unacceptable alteration of original substance, even when later on it's made reversible with tuning sleeves. = With reeds things are even more delicate with their complex resonator-shallot-tongue scale/length relationship. When a 19th cty organ builder had to "upgrade" an ancient pipe organ to = new standards he used to re-set up or down the entire pipe rank on the chest manufacturing one or two new pipes matched to scale at the extreme. This = way he achieved the new pitch without altering original scales and substance (Cavaille-Coll did this quite often and published several very instructive essays about pitches and tuning questions).   String instruments tolerate temporary pitch alterations- but it is a more delicate matter than it seems at first sight and never should be attempted without consulting a luthier or instrument builder first. Strings are = scaled to a specific pitch range too, even when this range tolerance is wider = than in pipe organs. But I have seen enough cracked and warped violins, harpsichords and pianos whose owners -or thoughtless tuners- raised the pitch without criteria. The total tension increase on frame and soundboard when the pitch is raised "only 10 cents" is incredibly high. But this is topic of another List.....   Coming to a "Pitch dark" end (LOL) Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: RE: Biggs recordings From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 11:30:47 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Ouch. I didn't know the story of the lost tapes. But I would be glad if someday Biggs' recordings (mostly his Bach and Mozart recordings) were remastered, even from well conserved vinyl records. They constitute = valuable organ performing history documents in my opinion, even when tastes and interpretation styles are different in our days.   Cheers Andres      
(back) Subject: Re: Pitch question From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 11:05:39 -0400   on 8/22/03 10:20 AM, Alan Freed at acfreed0904@earthlink.net wrote:     > > I've puzzled over that for 55 years or more, and heard a lot of = theories. > "A Mighty Fortress" in C is nothing like itself in D. And, weirdly = enough, > I'll bet it's a lot different in D-sharp than in E-flat! Is it totally > psychological? Does an a cappella choir go flat in D-flat, but not (or = less > so) in C-sharp? Does it have anything to do with our fallen state since > Eden? > > If you find any answers, I hope you'll share them. > > Alan   I found on the Glenn Gould discussion list (http://www.glenngould.org/mail/archives/f_minor/msg01215.html) Gould rejecting the idea that keys had any particular associations for Bach:   "When focusing on the sets of preludes and fugues designed to exploit the new tempered tuning, Davis [who was interviewing Gould] pointed out that Bach transposed a sketch for a fugue written originally in C major to C sharp major because he needed a piece in that key to make the set complete. The fugue was then expanded in its new key. GG's response was one he commonly gave when the matter of his playing Baroque music on the 20th Century piano arose. He steadfastly held that Bach was not concerned about timbres, given that he happily transcribed the same work for different instruments. Furthermore, such transcriptions often involved transposition as well. Then, after mentioning Chopin's, and particularly Scriabin's fixation on the "characteristics" of different keys (some were "bright," some were "lascivious," etc.), he added his own whimsical comment about the two keys involved in Davis' example, saying that Bach would take a piece in C major, "a pure, upstanding, solid citizen key," and transpose it to C sharp major, "a slightly dirty-old-man key." This should convey that GG is definitely referring to KEY, not any scale, and that as an exponent of the Baroque era, key signature had no "interpretation," and that his description of himself as "f minor" was a spoof of those composers who did allude to keys as having significance beyond their usually arbitrary selection (except, of course when instrumental or vocal ranges dictated a practical key.)"     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu          
(back) Subject: Disney Hall (was: NYTimes.com Article) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 12:27:30 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Thanks a lot for this. The organ raised a big controverse in other List a couple of months ago due to its bold = design. Big controverses usually means big interest. More info about the organ on Glatter-Goetz website www.gg-organs.com/def03.htm I am glad that this -at least externally- so unusual organ can be appreciated soon.   Cheers Andres        
(back) Subject: Re: perfect pitch From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 11:31:07 -0500   Last semester when I was learning the C major Prelude, Fugue, and Chaconne by Buxtehude I got a CD of it by Harald Vogal. When I went to listen to it, I would have sworn it was in D major since the organ was tuned about a whole step higher than what I am used to. When I would go to play it, it sounded so much better to transpose it up the step, but then my fingers would get confused...   when i need an e-flat, i think of the > opening of mahler's 8th symphony, or bach's st. anne P&F. from there, > i can get any other pitch i need.     Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"