PipeChat Digest #3905 - Tuesday, August 26, 2003
 
Re: Gordon Young organ music
  by "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com>
Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz
  by "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net>
Re: Catholic Hymns
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz
  by "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net>
Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Atlantic City
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal
  by "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com>
Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
if this is Monday, it must be ...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net>
Re: if this is Monday, it must be ...
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ History
  by <melisma@uniserve.com>
RE: Catholic Hymns
  by <DionDave@aol.com>
Methuen
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: Organ History
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Europe's biggest soundboard
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Bridlington Priory web site
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Oh dear!!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Oh dear!  Bridlington web site
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Value of a 1982 Solid State system?
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
16' bourdon
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Gordon Young organ music From: "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 11:35:19 -0700 (PDT)   I have about 10 of the Gordon Young books and in each one is a gem. Many = of the pieces I have not used. There is the Passacaglia, some Trumpet = Tunes, Postlude on "We Gather Together," Chorale Prelude on "St. Anne," = and many others. I find his work either very good or very bad, but that = one piece in each book is worth the price (I bought most of them years = ago). Another composer who has some really nice pieces is Dale Wood. His = work is not extremely hard but sounds very difficult. His arrangement of = the tunes from "The Sacred Harp" are very nice. Douglas Wagner also has = some nice pieces. His settings of Psalms are wonderful and everything in = the book is usable in church. With as much music as we have, if I get = bored working on something, I just go to something else. When I had a = full time church position I had to use mostly music that did not take much = work, or things I could sight read through the first time, so I became = very selective of contemporary music. Now I am working on a recital that was to be given in September, but due to = illness, the house flooding and having to get EVERYTHING we own out of = storage buildings after the flooring is down, it will be in April. We may = (or may not) be through with this "move" by then. I still had not = completely unpacked my things, and the things that were are packed again. = We will probably have a giant estate sale after unpacking and keeping just = the things we need. The hot water tank was supposed to be here this = morning, but isn't. The insurance adjuster was supposed to have a check = for us to get the flooring, but we don't have it yet. We are thinking to = getting a tent and air mattresses when the water is turned on and camping = out in the bedroom, until they put the flooring down there. This is = getting too long so I will quit rambling. Lee   Fran Walker <fwalker@northwestern.edu> wrote:Dear Friends,   I recently learned Gordon Young's Toccata (Homage to Widor), HF-5097? = It's charming and not horribly difficult. Could you recommend a similar = piece by him? Thanks for your advice!   Sincerely, Fran Walker Organist, North Shore Methodist Church, Glencoe, IL   ************************************************** Fran Walker (fwalker@northwestern.edu)         --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.  
(back) Subject: Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz From: "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 14:12:22 -0500   >>I suppose the next post will claim the >>London Underground system as the bottom >>octave extension of the 128ft at the >>Albert Hall!         Well, maybe the labyrinth of the city's sewer system would be the = perfect conduit for such a deep, gratifying tone.     Speaking of extreme bass...   http://www.contrabass.com/2002/2002-06-08.html            
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Hymns From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 14:12:04 -0500       chemphill wrote:   > GIA publishers in Chicago own the [rights] to St. Gregory.   Not to the first edtiion: Fr. Montani copyrighted the first edition of St. Gregory Hymnal and Catholic Choirbook in 1920; it is in the public domain.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 16:28:01 -0400   On 8/25/03 3:12 PM, "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> wrote: > =20 > Well, maybe the labyrinth of the city's sewer system would be the perfect > conduit for such a deep, gratifying tone. > =20 Bill: Would you be offended if I mentioned the FONT in which your messages arrive? It appears to be =B3Courier.=B2 A bit small, but, worst of all, VERY LIGHT weight. =20   Most posts I read (100s per day), I blow up at least one notch, usually two= , for easier reading. Yours are the worst. I blow =8Cem up three or four notches, and they get bigger, all right, but the =B3line weight=B2 that forms that font remains so light that I=B9m barely able to make it out.   If you=B9ve got a reason for your font-choice, stick with it. But if not, I=B9= d be delighted to see your stuff in Times or any of several much more readabl= e fonts.   Maybe?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz From: "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 15:56:48 -0500   Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz>>I'd be delighted to see your = stuff in Times or >>any of several much more readable fonts.         Will do.            
(back) Subject: Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 17:45:57 -0400   On 8/25/03 4:56 PM, "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> wrote:   > Will do. >   Thanks awfully. (Old age, you know.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 18:30:15 -0400   Hi Nate, They aren't very musical, but we have a pair of cabin cruiser horns at the auto shop I work at that are tuned to some dissonant note pair and make their sound by the vibration of brass reeds.. We power them straight off the shop air hose that's regulated to 120psi. If I have the formula correct, that's about 2400" of wind. They will almost stop your heart in the confines of the shop if you are surprised by the sounding of them (but that's the whole purpose of the exercise as it were). (grin) Cheers Mike   Bigaquarium wrote:   > Greetings, Thanks for the ACCH organ info! Has > any part of the organ actually been releathered at > any point? Hmmm, I wonder what a 2000" reed would > sound > like! > -Nate    
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal From: "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 08:41:26 +1000   On 26/8/03 4:35 AM, "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> wrote:   >=20 > If Mark Quarmby is reading this he could tell you more about it than > I can.   I have been following this thread but been flat-out helping my Year 12 students finish off their compositions for their Matriculation exams in a couple of weeks. My how times have changed! Now we work online using Sibelius and MSN messenger and until 2am this morning! Two of my pupils hav= e written organ toccatas, and not being keyboard players, I have been tidying them up to fit under the hands (and feet) more comfortably.   As far as the Town Hall organ goes (my school music studio overlooks the Sydney Town Hall from the 8th level of St Andrew's House next door), I can assure you the 64' is full length. It is probably a good bit longer by the time you measure the foot etc. If you can imagine the fa=E7ade, the pedal division spreads across the back wall, but the 64' is on the far left and heavily mitred. I think Bottom C bends over about 3 times. I know that whe= n you climb to the top of the rank (there is a stairway built inside like a house!), you can look down the top of the pipes and I reckon you could easily fit three people in.   If you followed Bob's link in a later email, you will have all seen the picture of the bottom of the Bottom C with the glass window showing the reed. There is also a pneumatic motor and brake to start and stop the reed. There is also a famous picture of Marcel Dupr=E9 standing beside it.   As far as the tone of the rank is concerned, playing it by itself, it sound= s quite comical. You can actually hear it beating something like a jack-hammer, 8 times a second. It is not very loud - the 32' reed is much louder. Its use comes when adding it to the full chorus. When you have reached full organ and add the 64' near the end of a piece, it is like adding another chorus because of the huge amount of harmonics it produces. It is also very effective at the top of the bottom octave where it acts as an extension of the 32', although softer.   Someone commented earlier about writing +64' on their music. I do it all th= e time - especially if I am going overseas. It is always fun to see the reactions of people (especially in Europe) when I open up my music and they see that written on it!)     Cheers,   Mark            
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 16:03:02 -0700 (PDT)   How often would you use such nonsense? Having a 42 2/3' stop would be = about as useful as having a Trompette-en-Chamade Celeste. I have seen several organs which had a 64' reed which had four or five = pipes to accomodate pieces written in B, B flat, A, A flat, and sometimes = G. Anything lower than that is a useless noise. In Franck's Piece = Heroique, the piece, which ends in B Major, if you have on a 32' reed, low B is only a half-step lower than = 16' C. The 64" reed really sounds like a 32' reed on this note. D. Keith Morgan   Bill <bill.hauser@cox.net> wrote: Wow... A 42-2/3' stop?! Paired with a 64', wouldn't that produce a 128' resultant? Can we say "excess?"     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software  
(back) Subject: Re: London Double Contra Bass Unters--tz From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 19:16:10 -0400   > Speaking of extreme bass... > > http://www.contrabass.com/2002/2002-06-08.html   some people have WAAAAAAAY too much time on their hands.  
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City - party horns From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 00:22:03 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I think, somewhere in Canada, there is a town hall/city hall which has a whole row of high pressure horns acting like a latter-day carillon.   Does anyone know where this might be?   Vancouver perhaps?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> wrote: > Hi Nate, > They aren't very musical, but we have a pair of > cabin cruiser horns at the auto shop I work at that > are > tuned to some dissonant note pair and make their > sound > by the vibration of brass reeds.. We power them > straight off the shop air hose that's regulated to > 120psi.   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: if this is Monday, it must be ... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 16:50:20 -0700   IRC!   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City - party horns From: "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 18:52:34 -0500   "...a whole row of high pressure horns acting like a latter-day carillon."         I don't know about that, but it got me to thinking about train whistles = (horns). I'm wondering why they're mostly tuned to play a 6th chord = (I-III-V-VI)---at least in the States. I suppose we may never know.   Or does anyone else listen to the intervals of train whistles besides = me?!   Maybe a theatre organist displaced by the diminishing job prospects went = to work for Union Pacific as a horn tuner and couldn't get that = ever-present 6th chord out of his head(?)            
(back) Subject: Re: if this is Monday, it must be ... From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 19:54:33 -0400   Since when did that make any difference? (grin) ^O-O^   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > IRC! > > Cheers, > > Bud > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ History From: <melisma@uniserve.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 09:19:53 +0900   Quoting Margarete Thomsen <mthomsen@umich.edu>:   > online organ history: > > http://panther.bsc.edu/~jhcook/OrgHist/begin.htm           I tried to access this site, but was unsuccessful. Is the url correct, or = am I doing something wrong from this end? (I just clicked on the link, btw...)   Thanks! Would love to have a look...   Melisma (going back into hiding here under her Rock)    
(back) Subject: RE: Catholic Hymns From: <DionDave@aol.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 20:37:10 EDT   A suggestion in. re. the request for Catholic Hymn suggestions.   One of my favorite hymns is Hymn #1 in the "St. Basil's Hymnal": Praise = to the Holiest in the Height. The text is the familiar John Henry Newman = text. The tune is by A. Somervell. I fist sang it at a Mass marking the 25th anniversary of San Francisco Archbishop Quinn's episcopal ordination. The = tune oozes Victorian Anglican High Church even though the composer was a recusant who =   wrote it specifically for a new English Roman Catholic Hymnal published = circa 1905 (a little late for your initial time frame). But, try it .. you'll = like it. Dave Dion    
(back) Subject: Methuen From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 20:39:17 -0400   Hi all,   I'm curious about the Methuen instrument as well... From what I understand a lot of the pipework has been replaced/changed and it is now = on slider chests instead of the ole' kegellade cone-valve type chests... Are cone valves just a one-for-one substitute for pallets? I am ever-appreciative of the info!   = -Nate      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ History From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 20:39:36 -0400   Hi Melisma, I think the site is just a bit overwhelmed at the moment because it = was brought to the attention of readers on both major organ lists. Suggest you = try again later, and yes the URL given is correct. Cheers Mike     melisma@uniserve.com wrote:   > Quoting Margarete Thomsen <mthomsen@umich.edu>: > > > online organ history: > > > > http://panther.bsc.edu/~jhcook/OrgHist/begin.htm > > I tried to access this site, but was unsuccessful. Is the url correct, = or am I > doing something wrong from this end? (I just clicked on the link, = btw...) > > Thanks! Would love to have a look... > > Melisma (going back into hiding here under her Rock)    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 20:07:55 -0500   At 01:44 PM 8/25/2003 -0400, several folks wrote: > > A 42-2/3' stop?! > > Paired with a 64', wouldn't that produce a 128' resultant? > > Can we say "excess?" > >i think musicality just flew out the window.     If one considers this *particular* organ, and especially the Hall into which it is designed to play, I'd think you might be a bit surprised at = how logical a 64' stop would be, and/or a whole host of otherwise excessive-seeming stops/couplers/etc. (actually, I believe the "original" =   plan/spec for the ACCH organ called for *2* full-length 64's...!)   Remember that the Atlantic City organ was (is) designed specifically, from =   conception, to be the world's largest single musical instrument. Remember =   also that the room which it was designed to fill with organ sound is literally large enough to fly a small helicopter inside. Under those circumstances of organbuilding and design, I submit that all sorts of seemingly riduculous things might, in fact, be perfectly sensible (and indeed also perfectly *musical*, though that really depends more on how = any odd organist would *use* such oddities, would it not?)!   Cheers, Tim (who dearly hopes that both of the ACCH instruments will be restored to their ultimate, excessive glory within his lifetime. Visit http://www.acchos.org/ to help.)      
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 09:14:30 +0800   What you read is incorrect Ron. The 64' Contra trombone goes right down to bottom C with full length resonators. Thank you to Mark Quarmby for his posting on the subject. I won't repeat what was written. I suggest that those interested read Mark's posting. Regards, Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: RonSeverin@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 11:21:38 EDT   >Bob: >I recently read that the 64' Trombone pipes were short length, >perhaps 1/4. >    
(back) Subject: Europe's biggest soundboard From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 02:49:59 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   As a wee 15 year old, I did a spot of organ building. My first ever "job" was to travel backwards and forwards every day, starting at 6am (!) to Bridlington Priory....about 100 miles each way.   Something clicked in my memory and I went to check out the details.   Not only has this organ got the largest scale 32ft reed in the UK, I remembered that it also had the largest single soundboard. I now discover that it has the largest single soundboard in the whole of Europe, with a fairly staggering 4212 pipes on the Great.   A large (by UK standards) instrument with not a lot of extended ranks save for the pedal organ, it was originally built by the Belgian company Charles Anneessens in 1899, and variously re-built by Abbot & Smith, Hill and then Compton, before Laycock & Bannister got hold of it and added a lot of new pipework.   The Laycock & Bannister re-build was of good machanical quality (the firm always building organs like pocket battleships) but tonally it became something of a mess, as was common in the 1960's.   The general philosophy semed to be, "Add some screeching upperwork and an unenclosed Positive".   This was done, but in the most unsatisfactory manner, with little attention paid to tonal finishing. The pipes were voiced in the shop, then just popped into the piperacks and left well alone. So for years, it sounded like two organs playing a duet!   As miracle would have it, the central heating system went berserk and filled the church and the organ with paraffin fumes, which resulted in a major insurance claim. As miracles go, this was a good one, because the Laycock & Bannister company had then been taken over by the Nicholson of Worcester company, headed at the time by Denys Thurlow.   One of the best flue voicers alive, Denys Thurlow spent many "happy" hours crawling around and makng musical sense of the new and very raw pipework installed by the old regime, and the net result was a much finer instrument musically.   A bit of a roaring beast with a great thundering pedal 32ft reed, this organ is now probably unique in Europe as being, miraculously, recognisably Anneessens in tone; in spite of the attentions of several organ re-builders.   What we do know is that Anneessens was one terrible organ builder; the quality of his work lamentable, with most organs failing quite badly after a very few decades. Local to me were two very fine sounding instruments by the same company, but sadly, they were in such a dreadful mechanical condition, with pipes collapsing under their own weight due to a lack of antimony in the pipe-metal, they have now been replaced by sturdier instruments. Nevertheless, there is one hybrid organ at St Mary's, Bradford, here in West Yorkshire which still has traces of the old Anneessens organ, including the fine 16ft fronted organ case. The 32ft reed from the Bradford organ (opened by Jaques Lemmens), found its way to Leeds City Hall, where, in all its half length, free-reed glory, it continues to rumble majestically.   Tonally, Anneessens were quite fine, which makes the poor quality all the more lamentable.   For those interested, there is a web site for Bridlington Priory <bridlington priory.com> with many fine pictures of this splendid medieval building and the organ.   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK         ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Bridlington Priory web site From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 02:54:32 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Sorry, I gave out the wrong web site address.   It should have read:-   <bridlingtonpriory.so.uk>   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Oh dear!! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 02:55:21 +0100 (BST)     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Oh dear! Bridlington web site From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 02:57:31 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I've gone barking mad!   The site is....definitely....   <bridlingtonpriory.co.uk>   ..so.uk indeed!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Value of a 1982 Solid State system? From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 00:05:46 EDT   Hi everyone,   A friend of mine asked me to forward this to you. Maybe some of you could =   help him. Please forward your response to "Michaelmitch5@cs.com."   Josh, Do you have any idea as to the value of a 1982 Solid State Logic = combination action and driver board system. It will run 33 ranks with some unification =   along with chimes. There are 6 generals and 6 divisionals for pedal, 6 divisionals for Great, and 6 divisionals for Swell. There is one level of = memory. The system worked without any sort of problem. It was replaced for expansion purposes only. Any comparisons would be helpful. Thanks, Mike Mitchell      
(back) Subject: 16' bourdon From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 23:35:27 -0500   HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon in the pedal be soft = or more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my residence organ and wonder if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have 14 ranks when = finished. Thanks, Gary