PipeChat Digest #3906 - Tuesday, August 26, 2003
 
Re: 16' bourdon
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: 16' bourdon
  by "Chris Holtkamp" <Chris@Holtkamporgan.com>
Re: 16' bourdon
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: 16' bourdon
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Europe's biggest soundboard
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: 16' bourdon
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
RE: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
train whistles
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "F RICHARD BURT" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: 16' bourdon
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Concert Announcement - Lewisville TX [cross-posted]
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Europe's biggest soundboard
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Karg Elert
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Karg Elert
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: train whistles
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal
  by "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
Re: train whistles
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 11:25:53 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Just my ten pence worth.   Assuming that you do not live in a baronial hall or a marble mausoleum, I would guess that the acoustic is rather lifeless and the physical size of the room reasonably restricted.   If that be the case, then the lower frequencies will not bloom in the room very well and would be killed at birth. On the other hand, the higher frequencies from the upperwork (if any) will have an unrestricted field-day. You only have to think about what Wurlitzer did in such an acoustic.....plenty of bass which actually sounds balanced.   So unless you are His Grace the Duke of Marlborough in disguise, I would suggest a fairly robust sound from a 16ft Bourdon.   --- Gary Black <gblack@ocslink.com> wrote: > HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon > in the pedal be soft or > more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my > residence organ and wonder > if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have > 14 ranks when finished. > Thanks, Gary > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 07:03:45 EDT   Hi all,   On Sept 23rd, i will be leaving our precious hot and wet Florida for a = short week in Sydney.   If I go anywhere besides work, it will be to the Opera house.   Hope someone is playing that day. Does anyone know whom the organist(s) are there these days?   Is Amy Johansenn still hanging out there playing the heck out of Hakim? She is a fellow CCMer you know....     dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: "Chris Holtkamp" <Chris@Holtkamporgan.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 07:13:42 -0400   Hi Gary,   There is more to take into consideration than the absolute volume of the 16', whether it is loud or soft. We must also keep in mind the job that = it has to do. If it is the only 16' then it must fill many roles. Perhaps = you should consider a compromise; a level of should that is somewhere in between. It is true that with this approach it will never be exactly = right for one particular use. On the other hand it would have the greatest flexibility.   Chris ----- Original Message ----- From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 12:35 AM Subject: 16' bourdon     > HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon in the pedal be = soft or > more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my residence organ and = wonder > if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have 14 ranks when finished. > Thanks, Gary > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 08:03:50 EDT   Hi.   Why is it that when you build an organ and there is only a 16' Bourdon, it =   usually fills all roles adequately?   Why is it when you have a 40 rank organ and 3 16's in the pedal plus a = borrow from the keyboards, you can never find the EXACT sound you need?   Kinda like why do we park on a driveway and drive on a parkway thing, I guess.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 08:12:00 EDT   i was referring to the 128' pitch, not the 64'.  
(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 08:15:08 EDT   In a message dated 8/25/03 9:36:23 PM Pacific Daylight Time, gblack@ocslink.com writes:   << HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon in the pedal be = soft or more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my residence organ and = wonder if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have 14 ranks when = finished. Thanks, Gary >>   mine is pretty womba (big) and i like it that way. i have 37 ranks, with lots of 16s & 8s, so it has a heavy sound. given the choice, i'd rather = an organ be bottom heavy than top heavy.  
(back) Subject: Re: Europe's biggest soundboard From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 06:01:46 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> > My first ever "job" was to travel backwards and > forwards every day, starting at 6am (!) to Bridlington > Priory....about 100 miles each way. > > Something clicked in my memory and I went to check out > the details. > > Not only has this organ got the largest scale 32ft > reed in the UK, I remembered that it also had the > largest single soundboard. I now discover that it has > the largest single soundboard in the whole of Europe, > with a fairly staggering 4212 pipes on the Great.   Can this be true? I have a Vista recording of Raymond Sunderland at Bridlington made in 1972, 4 years after the "restoration" by Laycock and Bannister. The very complete notes include the claim that it has "one of = the largest scaled 32 ft. reeds in the British Isles (20 1/2" diameter at = bottom C)" -- and that sounds like enough to do the job -- but the Great is shown as 20 stops, 1490 pipes. The entire instrument as of 1972 comprised 4151 pipes.   MAF      
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 10:03:10 -0400   Yes, but if your cats go in and out as often as mine, it is surely = vibrating at a higher pitch than originally intended.   Ha!   -WG     > "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote" > > Hello, > > Not quite true David. > > I started to make one but ran out of money and space. > > The bottom CCCCCCCCCCCCCCC reed is now a cat-flap in > my front door. > > ;-) > > Regards, > Colin Mitchel UK > > --- David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> wrote: > > > > There are two FULL-Length 64's stops in the world > > that go all the way > > down to 64' C - The Contra Trombone in Sydney and > > the > > Diaphone/Dulzian in Atlantic City. All of the rest > > of the 64' stops > > either are either incomplete in the bottom or are > > Resultants.    
(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 10:10:03 -0400   Depends. Do your 14 ranks include another 16'?   -WG   > "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> wrote: > > HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon in the pedal be = soft or > more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my residence organ and = wonder > if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have 14 ranks when = finished. > Thanks, Gary >    
(back) Subject: RE: Atlantic City - party horns From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 07:11:03 -0700   The 6th chord will get your attention at crossings et. al. because it is not harmonically satisfying.   Mark S. Towne (railroad enthusiast) Las Vegas, Nevada (9 months away from the arrival of our 53-rank von Beckerath at UNLV) -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Bill Sent: Monday, August 25, 2003 4:53 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Atlantic City - party horns     "...a whole row of high pressure horns acting like a latter-day carillon."         I don't know about that, but it got me to thinking about train whistles (horns). I'm wondering why they're mostly tuned to play a 6th chord (I-III-V-VI)---at least in the States. I suppose we may never know.   Or does anyone else listen to the intervals of train whistles besides = me?!   Maybe a theatre organist displaced by the diminishing job prospects went to work for Union Pacific as a horn tuner and couldn't get that = ever-present 6th chord out of his head(?)            
(back) Subject: train whistles From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 10:21:21 -0400   on 8/26/03 10:11 AM, Mark & Cinda Towne at mstowne@concentric.net wrote:   The 6th chord will get your attention at crossings et. al. because it is not harmonically satisfying. Mark S. Towne (railroad enthusiast) Las Vegas, Nevada (9 months away from the arrival of our 53-rank von Beckerath at UNLV) -----Original Message-----     I agree that there is something vaguely alarming, and unsatisfying, about the chord train whistles sound, but I am puzzled by this, because sixth chords in musical contexts are usually quite satisfying to my ear. You = can end a pop tune with a sixth chord and it sounds great, if a little old-fashioned and/or schmaltzy. I'm guessing that there may be a = difference in the voicing. What notes would a typical train whistle play in C? C E = G A or C E G A C or E G A C or what?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 09:29:10 -0500   Greetings:   Thanks to everyone for their suggestions for music this Sunday in Milwaukee= ..   I compiled a list for your "enjoyment"!   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory     Fantasia on "Wild Thing" Chorale Prelude on "Easy Rider" "The Lord Preserve Thy Going Out and Thy Coming In" "Ezekiel Saw The Wheel" "Leader of the Pack" Something about King Solomon, since he was a "Davidson" "Born to be Wild" "Leader of the Pack" in the style of Pachelbel. Toccata on "Chitty Chitty Bang! Bang!"   *The following hymns might be apporopriate:   "Harley, Harley, Harley" (Tune: Nicaea)   "Abike With Me" (Tune: Eventide)   =B3Ride on O Men Of God=B2 (Tune: Festal Song)   =B3Ride on! Ride On In Majesty=B2 (Tune: St. Bartholomew)   "God of Our Life Through all the Cycling Years" (Tune: Alberta)   *Courtesy of my wife   -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City - party horns From: "F RICHARD BURT" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 09:31:48 -0500   Hello, Bill et al: You wrote: > I don't know about that, but it got me to thinking about > train whistles (horns)... Interesting that the description was akin to   "...a whole row of high pressure horns acting like a latter-day carillon." The old timers talking about train whistles (now horns) used to describe a whistle as a "five chimer, seven chimer," etc. My visual rememberances of the steam whistle was that it appeared to be one unit, atop the steam dome. However, I also distinctly remember that different locomotives had distinctly different sounding whistles. The most distinctive was that used by the Missouri Pacific on their steam engines for their EAGLE passenger trains. This was a multi-pitch sound with a very low pitch (compared with most of the steam switchers and freight hogs in the area). One other characteristic of a train locomotive (so I have been told) is that the actual pitch of the modern horn(s) does not hit the pitch intervals normally associated with music. Supposedly, this allows the horn to penetrate the modern automobile better and distinguish itself from the music on the auto's radio. Maybe a safety proposition? This I know. The trains that pass my church while we are in worship are always off-key. <grins> They match nothing being sounded on the organ or piano. F. Richard Burt ..  
(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 15:56:08 +0100   The reason a lone 16 ft Bourdon 'usually fills all roles adequately' is = that the sound is predominantly fundamental and at very low frequencies the = human ear does not discriminate well between different volume levels - hence = 'one size fits all'. This is true near the bottom of the pedal board but starts to fall to pieces towards the upper end - see our old friend the Fletcher-Munson curve.   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html ----- Original Message ----- From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 1:03 PM Subject: Re: 16' bourdon     > Hi. > > Why is it that when you build an organ and there is only a 16' Bourdon, = it > usually fills all roles adequately? > > Why is it when you have a 40 rank organ and 3 16's in the pedal plus a borrow > from the keyboards, you can never find the EXACT sound you need? > > Kinda like why do we park on a driveway and drive on a parkway thing, I > guess. > > dale in Florida >    
(back) Subject: Concert Announcement - Lewisville TX [cross-posted] From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 10:14:41 -0500   GO FOR BAROQUE! A concert of sacred and secular English music of the 16th-18th centuries Cellie Adams, Jennifer Benson, and Tom Cole, vocalists Dr. Margo Dillard, harpsichord Sunday, Sept. 7, 6:30 pm Sanctuary of First United Methodist Church, 907 W. Main St., Lewisville, Texas Covered dish dinner in Soul Cafe following the concert    
(back) Subject: Re: Europe's biggest soundboard From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:03:18 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   It was only when I had mispinterpreted the Bridlington Priory web-site and then started to do a mental count, that I realised my memory (after something close on 40 years) was playing tricks.   In fact....it has the longest SINGLE soundboard (winchest) in Europe, but I can't recall if this is the one for the huge scaled 32ft reed and its various derivates.   HOWEVER, I wasn't quite so far wide of the mark, because Charles Anneessens usually used a common chest for both Great and Choir organs which, dropping the Mounted Cornet as an off-chest addition (?), and the derived 16ft metal from the Great, would still give us about 33 ranks; assuming that the 16,8 & 4ft reeds are independent. If not, then it still adds up to an impressive 31 ranks! That's the better part of 2,000 pipes on one chest, assuming that the original chest has been retained and was of the common Great/Choir type described.   So far as I am aware, the original chests are still used, but obviously altered from the original.   Interestingly, Charles Anneessens was one of the very first organ-builders to utilise electric action on a regular basis, and this was certainly the case in Bradford near to where I live; the hybrid organ of considerable interest but in a parlous state the last time I played a recital there.   In fact, St.Mary's RC Bradford, here in the UK, is a massive church with a very high roof and a big acoustic. Not only does nothing much seem to be known about the original Anneessens locally, but the pipework which was incorporated into the current hybrid instrument (using the Anneessens chests perhaps?) was made by Booth of Otley, apparently a disciple of Schulze. Once again, we seem to know very, very little about this organ builder, but the quality of the pipework speaks for itself. The nice thing about this organ is the way in which the remaining Belgian and the English pipework blend nicely.   Until about 15 years ago, there was another quite fine sounding, but dreadfully built Anneessens also in Bradford at St.Joseph's RC church, and a two manual in Lancashire which I remember going to tune as a boy.   I know that the organ at Farm Street, London, where Guy Weitz was once organist, had an organ originally built by Anneessens but later re-built by Willis.   That's about as much as I know about the Belgian organ-builder or about Belgian organ-building in general. In fact, do they actually BUILD organs in Belgium, and if so, who does it?   Their chocolates are wonderful of course!   Sorry about the confusion.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         -- M Fox <ophicleide16@direcway.com> wrote: > > > Can this be true? I have a Vista recording of > Raymond Sunderland at > Bridlington made in 1972, 4 years after the > "restoration" by Laycock and > Bannister. The very complete notes include the claim > that it has "one of the > largest scaled 32 ft. reeds in the British Isles (20 > 1/2" diameter at bottom > C)" -- and that sounds like enough to do the job -- > but the Great is shown > as 20 stops, 1490 pipes. The entire instrument as of > 1972 comprised 4151 > pipes.     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: RE: Karg Elert From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:03:23 -0400   > I'd like to ask the list what Karg-Elert works are truly worth playing =     I know only three, two of them chorale preludes, and I think that = they'are all worthwhile.   First, of course, is the well-known "Nun danket".   Second, "Aus Tiefer Not" from op. 65, is slow and quiet, not difficult. = It reminds me of Brahms's chorale preludes.   The third is "Symphonische Choral Jesu, Meine Freude". I guess you'd = call the first and third movements difficult, but I was surprised that = they aren't really very fussy registrationally. The third movement is a = lively fugue with some really rich moments (in the best sense, where = themes and subjects that had been separately introduced and developed = suddenly come together). But if you're looking for not-too-difficult, = the second movement is the prize. The solo line, actually a highly = ornamented presentation of the chorale but with so much character that = you hear it as a totally different melody, is to be played on a = quintadena (and it works very well), then later on a "dunkel" (dark) = flute. The lavish but unobtrusive accompaniment is written on three = staves. I think of Rheinberger, or someimes of Widor in this movement, = while the treatment of the chorale is actually firmly rooted in Bach's = ornamented chorale preludes. =20      
(back) Subject: RE: Karg Elert From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:05:38 -0400   > I believe it was Howells who said something like "I am British by = birth, Irish by extraction, Canadian by immigration and Scotch by = infusion".=20   Howells never lived in Canada. You're probably thinking of Healey = Willan.      
(back) Subject: Re: Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:12:49 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Thanks for that amusing list, which I hope will be featured on a YAMAHA, scanned with NORTON and a musical TRIUMPH.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Patricia/Thomas Gregory <tgregory@speeddial.net> wrote: > Greetings:   > I compiled a list for your "enjoyment"! > > Fantasia on "Wild Thing" > Chorale Prelude on "Easy Rider" > "The Lord Preserve Thy Going Out and Thy Coming In" > "Ezekiel Saw The Wheel" > "Leader of the Pack" > Something about King Solomon, since he was a > "Davidson" > "Born to be Wild" > "Leader of the Pack" in the style of Pachelbel. > Toccata on "Chitty Chitty Bang! Bang!"     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:21:09 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Theatre organ enthusiasts will know all about steam whistles.   Sidney Torch composed his "Flying Scotsman" and recorded it for posterity on the Wurlitzer of the Gaumont State Cinema, Kilburn, London.   The way he got the whistle effects and steam sounds all at the same time is really quite remarkable....well worth hearing on the cleaned up CD version using CEDAR processing.   He even recorded a piece entitled, "Yahoo!"   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > What notes would a typical train > whistle play in C? C E G > A or C E G A C or E G A C or what?     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal From: "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:37:24 -0400     The Wanamaker Organ has a 64' too but that one is also a resultant=2E Original Message: ----------------- From: Colin Mitchell cmys13085@yahoo=2Eco=2Euk Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 19:06:33 +0100 (BST) To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall specs--64' in Pedal     Hello,   Definitely resultant!   In any event, Willis would never have made a genuine 64ft when he could have used a stoppered 32ft and charged them for the full length version!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Bill <bill=2Ehauser@cox=2Enet> wrote: >=20 >=20 > What about the status of the Royal Albert Hall > 64'=2E=2E=2E anyone know which of the above categories it > would fall into?     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk=2Emessenger=2Eyahoo=2Ecom/ "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www=2Epipechat=2Eorg List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat=2Eorg Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat=2Eorg       -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E      
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:43:39 -0400     Tina Hemphill kindly sent me a pdf of a U.S. Department of Transportation publication entitled "Study of the Acoustic Characteristics of Railroad = Horn Systems," which lists the following five sets of frequencies for what I understand to be typical U.S. train whistles (I have indicated what I = think the pitches would be, but I'm unsure about 480 and 554--assistance would = be greatly appreciated):       1. 244, 311, 400 =3D C, E flat, A 2. 311, 370, 480 =3D E flat, G flat, something between B flat and B 3. 311, 370, 494 =3D E flat, G flat, B   1. 255, 311, 370, 440, 554 =3D C, E flat, G flat, A, D flat (?) 2. 311, 370, 415, 494, 622 =3D E flat, G flat, A flat, B [C flat], E flat   The last one is a C flat (or B) sixth chord in first inversion. The next = to last one appears to be a C sixth chord with a dissonant C sharp on top (if I'm interpreting the frequency correctly).     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       on 8/26/03 12:21 PM, Colin Mitchell at cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk wrote:   > Hello, > > Theatre organ enthusiasts will know all about steam > whistles. > > Sidney Torch composed his "Flying Scotsman" and > recorded it for posterity on the Wurlitzer of the > Gaumont State Cinema, Kilburn, London. > > The way he got the whistle effects and steam sounds > all at the same time is really quite > remarkable....well worth hearing on the cleaned up CD > version using CEDAR processing. > > He even recorded a piece entitled, "Yahoo!" > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK >