PipeChat Digest #3907 - Tuesday, August 26, 2003
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #3905 - 08/26/03
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Re: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: train whistles
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
John Behnke
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
Re: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: John Behnke
  by "Rob Meyer, Jr." <rmeyer@stpeterslutheranchurch.net>
it's Vancouver
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
Re: Karg Elert
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: 16' bourdon
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Sydney Town Hall
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Sydney's Trombone and Dupre
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: train whistles
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Atlantic City - party horns
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: train whistles and perfect pitch
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: train whistles
  by "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com>
Re: train whistles
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: train whistles
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Sedio's Homage =E0 Widor
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3905 - 08/26/03 From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:46:02 EDT   In a message dated 8/26/03 5:02:53 AM Eastern Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   > HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon in the pedal be = soft > or > more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my residence organ and = wonder > if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have 14 ranks when = finished. > Thanks, Gary   I personally believe a 16' Pedal Bourdon should not be all that soft. = Now, if it was a 16' Bourdon doux borrowed from the Swell division or something = like that...well then it would be a different story (and it would, if it was a larger organ, have a bigger one too). I must say that I have played an = Estey before and the pedal division was vastly smaller-scaled than the rest of = the organ in my opinion. The 16' Bourdon was the "largest" pedal flue stop it =   had...and as you had implied, it was soft compared to the rest of the = organ. Personally, it was not enough to support the rest of the organ...not to = mention the screechy mixtures. On top of it the Oboe and the Trompette sounded the = same along with the fact that the only reed in the pedal was the 8' Trompette...though that is another story. I personally, would have liked = it a lot more if there was a 16' Trompette in the pedal even if the 16' Bourdon wasn't larger-scaled...but that's another story. Anyway, now that I've rambled = on, I must stop and hope that this has helped you. In a word (or a few)...it should be = larger scale.   Best Wishes, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Organist Union Methodist Church Havertown, PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City - party horns From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:50:34 -0400   On 8/26/03 10:11 AM, "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> wrote:   > The 6th chord will get your attention at crossings et. al. because it is= not > harmonically satisfying. > =20 > Mark S. Towne (railroad enthusiast) > Las Vegas, Nevada >=20 Mark, you may or may not be aware of a website called (I think) =B3Railnutter News.=B2 You could probably get the url from Google. It=B9s run by a friend o= f mine, and might be to your taste.   Alan Freed    
(back) Subject: RE: train whistles From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 09:58:08 -0700   train whistlesTrain whistles cascade in an arpeggio from top to bottom and in C would put C at the top then add A, G and finally E. They were manufactured under the name of the "Norton Air Chime".   Mark S. Towne Las Vegas, NV (who finally made the pilgrimage to the Tehachapi Loop in Southern California--one of the marvels of railroad engineering in the 19th = century).   -----Original Message-----     I agree that there is something vaguely alarming, and unsatisfying, about the chord train whistles sound, but I am puzzled by this, because sixth chords in musical contexts are usually quite satisfying to my ear. You can end a pop tune with a sixth chord and it sounds great, if a little old-fashioned and/or schmaltzy. I'm guessing that there may be a = difference in the voicing. What notes would a typical train whistle play in C? C E = G A or C E G A C or E G A C or what?       Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: John Behnke From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:17:20 -0500   Hello, Pipers:   I am returning to the list after a multi-year hiatus.   I found interest in the thread about Gordon Young. Young is on my list of favorites, which also includes Dale Wood and John Behnke. John is a professor at Concordia University - Mequon, WI. His hymntune settings are great. I use much of his music. I especially like his version of "The Ashgrove." Also, I am aware of an "Homage to Widor" piece by Mark Sedio.   I am pleased to preside over a 23-rank Daniel Jaeckel tracker which has served us well for 11 years. During the summer, we hold Thursday evening services at a small country church where I use a one-manual digital organ. This summer I invested in some hymntune-based, manuals-only publications and have found them to be extremely satisfying. If anyone is interested, I could blast out the titles in another email.   Bob Nickel Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church Sturgeon Bay, WI    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City - party horns From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:39:37 -0400   The five- and seven-note air horns were/are made by Nathan, for diesel = locomotives. Steam whistles were generally one- or two-chime. Some steam locos had both whistle and = horn, giving the engineer a choice, e.g., the NYC Niagaras and SP GS 4-8-4s.   Getting off-topic, this. Sorry.     Stan Yoder Pittsburgh (where there were once lotsa whistles and still lotsa horns)    
(back) Subject: Re: John Behnke From: "Rob Meyer, Jr." <rmeyer@stpeterslutheranchurch.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 15:12:57 -0400   Robert,   I agree with your assessment of Dr. Behnke. He is amazingly talented yet = at the same time extremely accessible. His music is truly fine quality. For those who are not aware the majority of his music is published by CPH, St. Louis, MO.   Peace to you!   Rob Meyer, Jr. Minister of Music St. Peter's Ev. Lutheran Church Eastpointe, MI   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 1:17 PM Subject: John Behnke     > Hello, Pipers: > > I am returning to the list after a multi-year hiatus. > > I found interest in the thread about Gordon Young. Young is on my list > of favorites, which also includes Dale Wood and John Behnke. John is a > professor at Concordia University - Mequon, WI. His hymntune settings > are great. I use much of his music. I especially like his version of > "The Ashgrove." Also, I am aware of an "Homage to Widor" piece by Mark > Sedio. > > I am pleased to preside over a 23-rank Daniel Jaeckel tracker which has > served us well for 11 years. During the summer, we hold Thursday > evening services at a small country church where I use a one-manual > digital organ. This summer I invested in some hymntune-based, > manuals-only publications and have found them to be extremely > satisfying. If anyone is interested, I could blast out the titles in > another email. > > Bob Nickel > Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church > Sturgeon Bay, WI > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: it's Vancouver From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 14:11:59 -0500   I do believe the aforementioned battery of airhorns are in Vancouver. = They made a brief appearance/sounding in a movie whose title escapes me right now. Anyone know more about the why and wherefore? Wouldn't it be nifty = if every big city had something like that? Electronic carrilons are a dime-a-dozen these days! I say let the trumpets blow!   BTW for those of you in the Chicago area, I need a sub on 9/21. Please = call me on the landline after 7pm at 312-944-9641.   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ MSN 8: Get 6 months for $9.95/month = http://join.msn.com/?page=3Ddept/dialup    
(back) Subject: Re: Karg Elert From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 14:34:54 -0500   Thanks for the suggestions, Paul. Oddly, after being rather negative about K-E's output in my e-mail to this list early on the morning of 8/20, I received a call an hour later from the flautist who was supposed to play = the prelude at our two early services on 8/24 but suddenly couldn't. I = scrounged around for something I hadn't played before and came up with "Lobet den Herrn mit Pauken und Zimbeln schoen" (Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals), Op. 101 [in the style of Handel, supposedly], by none other than Sigfrid Karg-Elert! All of this happened within the space of two hours and was, I suppose, a bit like Saul/Paul's experience on the road to Damascus. My eyes were opened, and behold I found a really good piece, which I = highly recommend.   Bob Lind ----- Original Message -----   > > I'd like to ask the list what Karg-Elert works are truly worth playing >   Paul Emmons replies:   > I know only three, two of them chorale preludes, and I think that = they'are all worthwhile. > > First, of course, is the well-known "Nun danket". > > Second, "Aus Tiefer Not" from op. 65, is slow and quiet, not difficult. It reminds me of Brahms's chorale preludes. > > The third is "Symphonische Choral Jesu, Meine Freude". I guess you'd = call the first and third movements difficult, but I was surprised that they aren't really very fussy registrationally. The third movement is a lively fugue with some really rich moments (in the best sense, where themes and subjects that had been separately introduced and developed suddenly come together). But if you're looking for not-too-difficult, the second movement is the prize. The solo line, actually a highly ornamented presentation of the chorale but with so much character that you hear it as = a totally different melody, is to be played on a quintadena (and it works = very well), then later on a "dunkel" (dark) flute. The lavish but unobtrusive accompaniment is written on three staves. I think of Rheinberger, or someimes of Widor in this movement, while the treatment of the chorale is actually firmly rooted in Bach's ornamented chorale preludes.      
(back) Subject: Re: 16' bourdon From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 15:09:04 -0500   opps, yes they do contain another 16' which is a 16' fagotto.=20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 9:10 AM Subject: Re: 16' bourdon     > Depends. Do your 14 ranks include another 16'? >=20 > -WG >=20 > > "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> wrote: > > > > HI List, I need opinions here. Should a 16' bourdon in the pedal be = soft or > > more assertive? I have an Estey bourdon for my residence organ and = wonder > > if it should be a bigger scale? The organ will have 14 ranks when = finished. > > Thanks, Gary > > >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20 >=20 >  
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Town Hall From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 21:37:58 +0100 (BST)   Interesting that Sydney Town Hall should come into the list this week, as I took delivery of two records from Australia less than a week ago, featuring Michael Dudman at the organs of Sydney Town Hall, (Hill 1890), The Great Hall, University of Sydney, (Von Beckerath, 1972) and Sydney Opera House (Sharp). One record, called Sydney Opera House Organ Extravaganza, is for solo organ and includes a collection of well known favourites by Bach, Buxtehude, Daquin, Bonnet, Messiaen and Vierne - a very fine performance of the Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor being notable amongst them. Superbly played, Michael Dudman gets the best out of this magnificent instrument. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation's microphone placement techniques seem to improve as time goes by - too close, I think in the earlier pieces, a warmer sound in the later. Sydney Town Hall is featured in two rarely heard works for organ and orchestra by Dupre, the Organ Concerto in E minor, Op 31 and the Symphony in G Minor for organ and orchestra, Op 29. And, yes, that splendid 64' reed makes its presence felt! These two CD's, and another 2 I have on order are very reasonably priced - I boght them "on-line" and they arrived in Greece about a week after ordering them. Well recommended as archive material - at $8.95 Australian per record they will not break the bank. They are available from Buywell Just Classical buywell@iinet.net.au John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Scrimbleshanks in territorial dispute Playing the piano in public   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney's Trombone and Dupre From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:24:45 EDT   It seems a bit odd that Mr. Hill's 64' Trombone should be featured in = the Dupre recording. I read that Dupre had actually heard the beast, and felt that it contributed little to the organ musically. He felt that it's value = was as an organbuilding curiosity.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:03:33 -0500   Can someone explain why train and organ enthusiasm are often found together? ;)   Alicia -who is wearing a Mikado (2-8-2) t-shirt- Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:43:39 -0400 Subject: Re: train whistles   > > Tina Hemphill kindly sent me a pdf of a U.S. Department of > Transportation > publication entitled "Study of the Acoustic Characteristics of Railroad > Horn > Systems," which lists the following five sets of frequencies for what I > understand to be typical U.S. train whistles (I have indicated what I > think > the pitches would be, but I'm unsure about 480 and 554--assistance > would be > greatly appreciated): > > > > 1. 244, 311, 400 =3D C, E flat, A > 2. 311, 370, 480 =3D E flat, G flat, something between B flat and B > 3. 311, 370, 494 =3D E flat, G flat, B > > 1. 255, 311, 370, 440, 554 =3D C, E flat, G flat, A, D flat (?) > 2. 311, 370, 415, 494, 622 =3D E flat, G flat, A flat, B [C flat], E = flat > > The last one is a C flat (or B) sixth chord in first inversion. The > next to > last one appears to be a C sixth chord with a dissonant C sharp on top > (if > I'm interpreting the frequency correctly). > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > on 8/26/03 12:21 PM, Colin Mitchell at cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk wrote: > > > Hello, > > > > Theatre organ enthusiasts will know all about steam > > whistles. > > > > Sidney Torch composed his "Flying Scotsman" and > > recorded it for posterity on the Wurlitzer of the > > Gaumont State Cinema, Kilburn, London. > > > > The way he got the whistle effects and steam sounds > > all at the same time is really quite > > remarkable....well worth hearing on the cleaned up CD > > version using CEDAR processing. > > > > He even recorded a piece entitled, "Yahoo!" > > > > Regards, > > > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: RE: Atlantic City - party horns From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 18:13:35 -0400   The experience of music is a subjective thing, eh? I've always felt that = 6th chords were EXTRA satisfying! Apparently Langlais did, too, seeing = how he ended up on them so often.   -WG   > "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> wrote: > > The 6th chord will get your attention at crossings et. al. because it = is > not harmonically satisfying. > > Mark S. Towne (railroad enthusiast) > Las Vegas, Nevada > (9 months away from the arrival of our 53-rank von Beckerath at UNLV) > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Bill > > "...a whole row of high pressure > horns acting like a latter-day carillon." > > I don't know about that, but it got me to thinking about train = whistles > (horns). > I'm wondering why they're mostly tuned to play a 6th chord > (I-III-V-VI)---at least in the States. > I suppose we may never know.    
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles and perfect pitch From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:15:48 -0500   Hello, Here is a little something that seems pertinent. :) At a party, my organ professor was asked by one of the other students to name the pitches of a train whistle. Anyone with perfect pitch could listen to those whistles (if you could find samples) and tell you approximately what they are.   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:43:39 -0400 Subject: Re: train whistles   > > Tina Hemphill kindly sent me a pdf of a U.S. Department of > Transportation > publication entitled "Study of the Acoustic Characteristics of Railroad > Horn > Systems," which lists the following five sets of frequencies for what I > understand to be typical U.S. train whistles (I have indicated what I > think > the pitches would be, but I'm unsure about 480 and 554--assistance > would be > greatly appreciated): > > > > 1. 244, 311, 400 =3D C, E flat, A > 2. 311, 370, 480 =3D E flat, G flat, something between B flat and B > 3. 311, 370, 494 =3D E flat, G flat, B > > 1. 255, 311, 370, 440, 554 =3D C, E flat, G flat, A, D flat (?) > 2. 311, 370, 415, 494, 622 =3D E flat, G flat, A flat, B [C flat], E = flat > > The last one is a C flat (or B) sixth chord in first inversion. The > next to > last one appears to be a C sixth chord with a dissonant C sharp on top > (if > I'm interpreting the frequency correctly). > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles From: "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:35:29 -0500   Mikado is a steam engine? Articulated? And as far as the explanation as to why train and organ enthusiasm are often found together, I can only say it is the attraction to sound that perks our ears up. And the sound of air passing through a pipe, like the sound of a train passing through an area, takes one instantly someplace else. And no one really knows where. Sounds romantic, doesn't it? Or we are all just short of sane:) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 5:03 PM Subject: Re: train whistles     > Can someone explain why train and organ enthusiasm are often found > together? ;) > > Alicia -who is wearing a Mikado (2-8-2) t-shirt- Zeilenga > Sub-Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > -----Original Message----- > From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:43:39 -0400 > Subject: Re: train whistles > > > > > Tina Hemphill kindly sent me a pdf of a U.S. Department of > > Transportation > > publication entitled "Study of the Acoustic Characteristics of = Railroad > > Horn > > Systems," which lists the following five sets of frequencies for what = I > > understand to be typical U.S. train whistles (I have indicated what I > > think > > the pitches would be, but I'm unsure about 480 and 554--assistance > > would be > > greatly appreciated): > > > > > > > > 1. 244, 311, 400 =3D C, E flat, A > > 2. 311, 370, 480 =3D E flat, G flat, something between B flat and B > > 3. 311, 370, 494 =3D E flat, G flat, B > > > > 1. 255, 311, 370, 440, 554 =3D C, E flat, G flat, A, D flat (?) > > 2. 311, 370, 415, 494, 622 =3D E flat, G flat, A flat, B [C flat], E = flat > > > > The last one is a C flat (or B) sixth chord in first inversion. The > > next to > > last one appears to be a C sixth chord with a dissonant C sharp on top > > (if > > I'm interpreting the frequency correctly). > > > > > > Randy Runyon > > Music Director > > Zion Lutheran Church > > Hamilton, Ohio > > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > > > > > on 8/26/03 12:21 PM, Colin Mitchell at cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk wrote: > > > > > Hello, > > > > > > Theatre organ enthusiasts will know all about steam > > > whistles. > > > > > > Sidney Torch composed his "Flying Scotsman" and > > > recorded it for posterity on the Wurlitzer of the > > > Gaumont State Cinema, Kilburn, London. > > > > > > The way he got the whistle effects and steam sounds > > > all at the same time is really quite > > > remarkable....well worth hearing on the cleaned up CD > > > version using CEDAR processing. > > > > > > He even recorded a piece entitled, "Yahoo!" > > > > > > Regards, > > > > > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:48:24 -0500   On another list, there was a lengthy discussion on those with common interests in organ/train/radio. Some thought it was the technical aspect of switching, relays, electronics, etc. I think its the sight and sound of great power. The roar of the A train between 59th & 125th Street and a 32' Bombarde seem to have a lot in common!!! :)   David E   David Evangelides Exiled to Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:03:33 -0500 Subject: Re: train whistles   > Can someone explain why train and organ enthusiasm are often found > together? ;) > > Alicia -who is wearing a Mikado (2-8-2) t-shirt- Zeilenga > Sub-Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > -----Original Message----- > From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:43:39 -0400 > Subject: Re: train whistles > > > > > Tina Hemphill kindly sent me a pdf of a U.S. Department of > > Transportation > > publication entitled "Study of the Acoustic Characteristics of > Railroad > > Horn > > Systems," which lists the following five sets of frequencies for what > I > > understand to be typical U.S. train whistles (I have indicated what I > > think > > the pitches would be, but I'm unsure about 480 and 554--assistance > > would be > > greatly appreciated): > > > > > > > > 1. 244, 311, 400 =3D C, E flat, A > > 2. 311, 370, 480 =3D E flat, G flat, something between B flat and B > > 3. 311, 370, 494 =3D E flat, G flat, B > > > > 1. 255, 311, 370, 440, 554 =3D C, E flat, G flat, A, D flat (?) > > 2. 311, 370, 415, 494, 622 =3D E flat, G flat, A flat, B [C flat], E > flat > > > > The last one is a C flat (or B) sixth chord in first inversion. The > > next to > > last one appears to be a C sixth chord with a dissonant C sharp on > top > > (if > > I'm interpreting the frequency correctly). > > > > > > Randy Runyon > > Music Director > > Zion Lutheran Church > > Hamilton, Ohio > > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > > > > > on 8/26/03 12:21 PM, Colin Mitchell at cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk wrote: > > > > > Hello, > > > > > > Theatre organ enthusiasts will know all about steam > > > whistles. > > > > > > Sidney Torch composed his "Flying Scotsman" and > > > recorded it for posterity on the Wurlitzer of the > > > Gaumont State Cinema, Kilburn, London. > > > > > > The way he got the whistle effects and steam sounds > > > all at the same time is really quite > > > remarkable....well worth hearing on the cleaned up CD > > > version using CEDAR processing. > > > > > > He even recorded a piece entitled, "Yahoo!" > > > > > > Regards, > > > > > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: RE: Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:53:18 -0500   You forgot "Born to Run" by Bruce Springsteen - lots of motorcycle imagery.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Patricia/Thomas Gregory Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 9:29 AM To: Pipechat Subject: Music for the Harley 100th Birthday Party   Greetings:   Thanks to everyone for their suggestions for music this Sunday in Milwaukee.          
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 18:12:42 -0500   At 05:03 PM 8/26/2003 -0500, Alicia wrote: >Can someone explain why train and organ enthusiasm are often found >together? ;)     Why, it must be the whistles, silly.....! Haven't you been reading the thread? ;-) ;-)   <giggle>   Tim (who would vote for "because both are enormous, expensive, unwieldy and completely fascinating marvels of human ingenuity....")    
(back) Subject: Sedio's Homage =E0 Widor From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 18:54:02 -0500   Some have asked for the Mark Sedio piece that is in homage =E0 Widor. The title of the book is Organ Tapestries, Volume 1, by Mark Sedio. It is published by Concordia Publishing House. The actual title of the piece is "Toccata on 'Christ, Whose Glory Fills the Skies.'" (It is based on the hymntune RATISBON.)   Bob Nickel Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church