PipeChat Digest #3913 - Thursday, August 28, 2003
 
Re: speaking of reger...
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
helllpp!
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
what's worse than electric train whistles?
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
pedal trill and winding
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic)
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
this summer's AGO regional conventions (X posted)
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Re: Train whistles
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic)
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Re: Conundrum
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3909 - 08/28/03
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: OHS 2003 - 4th Full Day - 6/23
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
The Temperamental Bach CD
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3912 - 08/28/03
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Train whistles
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: Speaking of Reger....
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Haworth (was Re: OHS 2003 - 4th Full Day - 6/23)
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Train whistles
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic)
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
new e-mail address for Bud Clark
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Photos on the URL?
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
toes only
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:48:49 EDT   In a message dated 8/28/2003 3:30:35 PM Central Daylight Time, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: and he calls for the swell box to CLOSE! of all the nerve. There are a few possibilities: Which edition was this in? It could have been an editor's marking. or... There could have been a hand operated swell box , or....the most likely... He intended for there to be a registrant present.   In the liner notes of a Franz Hauk recording of Reger, words used to = describe Reger's music included, " defiant, teutonic, humorous, and burlesque." = Reger is certainly one of my favorite 20th century composers because of his = command of counterpoint, adventurous, colorful harmonic ideas, and rich textures. = I have also heard that he was quite a drinker. b.t.w.-Paul Jacobs is currently learning ALL of Reger!!! Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:58:42 -0400   i don't know what edition, since i've never played any reger. my teacher = told me about it -- said she asked her page turner to play the top note = while she opened the box, and he refused. don't know what she did in = performance.  
(back) Subject: helllpp! From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:04:52 -0500   Hiyas pipe people,   On September 21 I am going to be on a much needed retreat and I need an organist for that day. If you are in the Chicago area, please pipe me a call. The church is St. Paul Episcopal in DeKalb and it's an easy $100. For your trouble, you get 37 ranks of joy and happiness which includes two =   32's (Subbass and Posaune--most of which works), and a big Tuba on 10'' wind. Sorry, the Swell isn't very effective right now as it only opens = 1/4. I left the hatch in the top open though so there is some sound getting out.   I may be reached either by email or landline which this weekend will be 815-498-1620.   BTW that DisneyOrgel is insane! It's about time new things be tried visually with pipes. More shiny tin along with the fries would be nice though. Can't wait to see what the Chamades are going to look like. A tangle of twisty straws perhaps? Utter cool!   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ Get MSN 8 and enjoy automatic e-mail virus protection. http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/virus    
(back) Subject: what's worse than electric train whistles? From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:09:51 -0500   Here's something to go with the electric train whistles--electronic = crossing gate chimes. Yep, DeKalb installed some of those at the downtown 4th and Lincoln Hwy. crossing of the U.P. mainline (formerly CNW). They sound pretty cheesy and they are barely half as audible as the real bells just a =   few blocks away. Is nothing sacred?   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ MSN 8: Get 6 months for $9.95/month = http://join.msn.com/?page=3Ddept/dialup    
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 18:10:14 -0400   On 8/28/03 4:52 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Perhaps a long stick is the answer? > You BET I'm tempted to say something bawdy, but you can be sure that, as a nice Lutheran boy, I will leave that up to YOU. (I don't know enough = about M. Reger to speculate.)   Alan (naughty tonight)      
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 18:27:27 -0400   In a message dated 8/28/2003 6:10:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > > Perhaps a long stick is the answer? > > > You BET I'm tempted to say something bawdy, but you can be sure that, as = a > nice Lutheran boy, I will leave that up to YOU. (I don't > know enough about > M. Reger to speculate.) > > Alan (naughty tonight)   yes, that caught my notice also, but i opted to not respond.   until now.   [smack]  
(back) Subject: pedal trill and winding From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:28:13 -0500   HI list, Here is a good one for all the organbuilders out there. I am currently working on Kommst du nun, Jesu, vom Himmel herunter from the Shubler Chorales by Bach. At the 15th measure there is a #F trill in the pedal. My pedal bourdon is winded from its own reservoir. I am using (on the great) 8' melodia and 2' 15th ( incidentally, I bought the 2' 15th = from Rich Schneider and it is wonderful, blends well in the diapason chorus and is great for softer stops too). When I play the trill, the notes that I = am playing on the great sound as if the tremulant is on when it isn't. What = is going on there and how do I get rid of that annoying vibrato? Thanks. = Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 18:51:36 -0400   On 8/28/03 6:27 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > yes, that caught my notice also, but i opted to not respond. until now.   Thank you. At least I'm not QUITE the only filthy-minded person around here. (At least you and I can ADMIT it!)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic) From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:07:04 -0400   A middle aged woman had cooked ham in the same manner all her life. She = would unwrap it, cut the end off and throw it away, and put the remainder = of the ham in the oven, etc. A friend asked her once why she cut off and = discarded the end. She said "I don't know. That's what my mother always = did, and the ham was always delicious." She called her aged mother on the = phone to pose the question. "Mother, why do we cut the end off of the ham = before cooking it?" The incredulous mother replied "My baking dish was too short = to hold a whole ham. That's why, my dear. Don't tell me you've been = doing that all these years."   Many early organs, including some that Bach played, had little = cantilevered levers sticking out of the console for pedals, like the = pedals on a spinet home organ. They were short and there was no room for = heels. That's why some players didn't use heels, my dear. Because the = pedals were too short for a whole foot - not because it was better.   -WG      
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:21:22 -0400   Hi Alan, I'm a sufficiently naughty Congo boy so allow me to propose that if = you possess the suggested auxiliary equipment of sufficient measure to reach = either of the 2 pedal notes or the swell shoe, then you possibly have a much = higher (and lucrative) calling than playing Reger. That is as far as the = Congregational Creed will allow me to expand on this subject. Mike (who may have just forfeited his ticket to Paradise for somewhat warmer climes)   Alan Freed wrote:   > On 8/28/03 4:52 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > > > Perhaps a long stick is the answer? > > > You BET I'm tempted to say something bawdy, but you can be sure that, as = a > nice Lutheran boy, I will leave that up to YOU. (I don't know enough = about > M. Reger to speculate.) > > Alan (naughty tonight) >    
(back) Subject: this summer's AGO regional conventions (X posted) From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:46:40 -0400   List, I would be interested to learn from those who attended one of this = summer's regional AGO conventions what was the most useful/ interesting LECTURE / WORKSHOP that you attended? Brief detail on the topic and presenter would be appreciated. Reply privately if you wish. Thanks,   HD    
(back) Subject: Re: Train whistles From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:14:10 -0700   The latest thing the railroads in the US are experimenting with is to replace the Horn on the trains with aimed horns at the crossing to make them more audible to the people at the crossing and less audible to resident in the near vicinity. Has anyone come across one of these yet?   Vern   Bruce Cornely wrote: > > Colin wrote: > <<In the UK, train whistles were a bit "baroque"....sort > of small and high pitched with tracker action.>> > > Colin, > In the USA AmTrak has pretty much replaced the air-horns with electric = ones > on their trains. They are much, MUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUCH = louder, > but because they move no air cannot be heard as great a distance as a > somewhat softer air-powered horn. They're also ugly to hear. > > Progress sucks! > > Scritchies and Haruffarrroooo-bow-ha-wow... > > Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at > HowlingAcres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 > Help Some Animals Free: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i > and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=3D308025421 > GET PAID to shop: http://ct.par32.com/?id=3D473FAAG381F58 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic) From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:15:50 EDT   In a message dated 8/28/03 5:51:21 PM Eastern Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   Just for clarity...I do it that way too. I was just commenting on my = first teachers approach. Interestingly enough...he too graduated from = Northwestern, though he stayed for eight years getting all his degrees there through Doctorate. I heard one person comment that he had taken way too many = classes at Northwestern. He is a fine person and has quite a few great ideas, so, I = am not trying to sound condescending about him or persons that graduated from Northwestern.   P.S. I pedal the fugue subject LRL though the first L being a heel, then = the rest toes.   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC   > Subject: Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic) > From: <Gfc234@aol.com> > Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 13:56:13 EDT > > I used the Bach D major for auditions at Yale, Northwestern, and Notre = Dame, > > as well as in two concerts. Each time, I simply used alternating toes > (l-r-l-r etc..) all the way up the scale, and didn't make a mistake = once. > It allows > precise articulation that is unavailable when using heels in that = situation. > > You just grab the key cheeks and go go go! As far as the fugue subject = is > concerned, I also alternated toes, and brought the left foot over the = right. > It > gives a mistake free articulation-no unevenness etc... > > Gregory Ceurvorst > M.M. Organ Performance > Northwestern University > Director of Music and Organist > St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL > 847.332.2788 home > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com >      
(back) Subject: Re: Conundrum From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:31:57 -0400   Dear Conundrum, There is a rodgers 360 and an Allen Mds Theatre III Deluxe on the = Theatre organ for sale site.=20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 5:28 PM Subject: Re: Conundrum     An allen with an expander box and adjustable trems will do the trick. = At my previous church I had an MDS 8-it could sound like a theater organ = VERY easily.   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3909 - 08/28/03 From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:46:32 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 7:03 AM Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3909 - 08/28/03     > We have owned for many years a house in Lyme Regis in > Dorset, and when I was about 10 years old, provided I > arrived very early in the morning, the engine driver > used to let me operate the splendid tank engine which > pulled the carriages and wagons back and forth between > Axminster and Lyme Regis.   This would have been one of the Adams 4-4-2 tanks of the former London & South Western Railway which were amongst the oldest steam locomotives in Britain, having been specially kept for the Lyme Regis branch because of their light axle loading.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: OHS 2003 - 4th Full Day - 6/23 From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:52:39 -0500   ---- Original Message ----- From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 11:23 AM Subject: Re: OHS 2003 - 4th Full Day - 6/23     > Thank you, Alan. > > What in Britain is pronounced like it looks, I ask you? It's like > Mahr-le-bone, accent on the first syllable. One does also hear Mare-le-bone.   One of my favorites is Towcester (not to be confused with electronic organs.) <g>   John Speller    
(back) Subject: The Temperamental Bach CD From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:53:16 -0400   Based on interest that we found in emails about temperaments after the discussion last week, there seems to be quite a bit of interest...as a = result we have recorded a CD with three works of Bach played identically on an = organ; the first, a Fantasia and Fugue played in Equal, Mean Tone and Kirnberger.   Followed by The Little Harmonic Labyrinth played in its entirety in:   Equal Mean Tone Pythagorean Kirnberger Werckmeister I Werckmeister III Young I Young III   and then Wir Glauben All in:   Equal Mean Tone Pythagorean Kirnberger Werckmeister I Werckmeister III Young I Young III   Playing was done by a MIDI file so there is no coloring of the playing to = milk the temperament for 'good' sounds.   At $4.95 (shipping and all included) it is cheaper than a Big Mac and = Fries and better yet, if you are dissatisfied in any way, you get all your money = back. Cheerfully refunded. Try getting that deal at McDonalds!   www.frogmusic.com   Use the link to THE TEMPERAMENTAL BACH.   Thanks for the bandwidth!   -- noel jones, aago noeljones@frogmusic.com 423 887-7594 www.frogmusic.com rodgers organ users group, moderator frogmusic press, executive director    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3912 - 08/28/03 From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:54:08 -0400   Brewse sez:   > but because they move no air cannot be heard as great a distance as a > somewhat softer air-powered horn.   If no air is moved there is no sound. And anyway, whaddaya mean, = "electric?" As in a loudspeaker being electric?   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh            
(back) Subject: Re: Train whistles From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:02:38 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 12:30 PM Subject: Re: Train whistles     > Colin wrote: > <<In the UK, train whistles were a bit "baroque"....sort > of small and high pitched with tracker action.>> > > Colin, > In the USA AmTrak has pretty much replaced the air-horns with electric ones > on their trains. They are much, MUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUCH = louder   Amen to that. Typically the difference between British and American steam locomotive whistles was that in the USA they used multiple whistles to produce chords. Often the driver/engineer was allowed to construct his = own whistle, which is why an engine would be "The only one that sounds that = way [/On the Achison, Topeka and the Santa Fe.]" Personally I hanker after = the old Great Western whistles of my youth in England, which were a pretty = loud high pitched whistle, generally overblowing.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:05:06 -0500   Ladies and Gentlemen,   I'd like to invite you to tune into ORGANLive, the best source of organ music on the web. ORGANlive streams classical organ music straight to your computer 24 hours a day, absolutely free of charge!. We're working to provide a varied and exciting selection of organ music. I could tell you = all about it, but I'd rather you go experience it for yourself. Simply go to http://www.organlive.com to see the website, and to tune in and listen! Your comments are always welcome, so please feel free to email us at comments@organlive.com.   Brent Johnson    
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of Reger.... From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 21:01:44 -0400   Colin sez:   > Roger Fisher managed to achieve the > impossible swell crescendo with both feet fully > occupied   Take the back off the console and have someone manipulate the swell pedal = manually.   Anthony Newman used that trick for his recording of Wagner at St. John the = Unfinished NYC minny, minny years ago.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh    
(back) Subject: Re: Haworth (was Re: OHS 2003 - 4th Full Day - 6/23) From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 21:07:23 -0400   Colin sez:   > It is pronounced "Howath"   That's not phonetically very specific. Do you mean:   Hoh waath (US midwestern flat A)   How waath   Hoh wahth   How wahth   And where's the accent?   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh    
(back) Subject: Re: Train whistles From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:29:22 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 7:14 PM Subject: Re: Train whistles     > The latest thing the railroads in the US are experimenting with is to > replace the Horn on the trains with aimed horns at the crossing to make > them more audible to the people at the crossing and less audible to > resident in the near vicinity. Has anyone come across one of these yet?   Yes, they have them in Webster Groves, Missouri (a suburb of St. Louis.) Personally I think they are a recipe for disaster, particularly in one crossing in Webster Groves where there is a corner which ensures there is = no way of seeing if a train is coming. What if the crossing failed to = operate (as they sometimes do)? Furthermore, it is nowhere nearly as audible. It is my view that most railroad crossings in the US are highly dangerous in any case, as Charles Dickens pointed out even in the nineteenth century. There is a very easy way of making them safer: it is known as a "bridge."   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: organist needing updating (a bit off the topic) From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 22:05:45 EDT   In a message dated 8/28/03 5:17:03 PM Pacific Daylight Time, OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com writes:   << I pedal the fugue subject LRL though the first L being a heel, then the =   rest toes. >>   i originally learned the work with the heel/toe approach. however, a = friend learned it shortly after i did with all toes, so i asked my teacher about = it. he said he preferred to play the D scale with L-L-R-L-R-L-R-R because of = the articulation that naturally occurs, but he didn't care if i played it with = my earlobes as long as the articulation was correct. it seems from what i've =   read on here that most organists play it with the left foot falling on the = F# & C# whereas he played it with the right foot falling on those notes.  
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 21:09:10 -0500   Well, I wasn't going to add to this and kept deleting everything, but the Congregational reference has weakened my resolve.   My first organ teacher taught me from 1954 to 1957 in a New England Congregational church that had a wonderful 1926 4-manual E.M. Skinner with = 6 celestes, all the great solo reeds, etc. All I wanted to do was improvise, but I did manage to learn a few pieces, anyway. :-)   One day at a lesson he mentioned that he had previously taught at Smith College (women only), and that one of his students said during one of her lessons "I can't reach THAT note while I'm playing all these others, but = you men have something extra that would allow YOU to play it."   Bob Lind ----- Original Message -----   > Hi Alan, > I'm a sufficiently naughty Congo boy so allow me to propose that if you > possess the suggested auxiliary equipment of sufficient measure to reach either > of the 2 pedal notes or the swell shoe, then you possibly have a much higher > (and lucrative) calling than playing Reger. That is as far as the Congregational > Creed will allow me to expand on this subject. > Mike    
(back) Subject: new e-mail address for Bud Clark From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:50:18 -0700   As of Sunday, Aug. 31:   quilisma@cox.net   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Photos on the URL? From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 23:00:01 -0400   At 01:03 PM 8/28/03 +0100, you wrote:   >I have added some photos of the Volos - Milies narrow >gauge steam railway to the Photo section of Organists >Off topic. Colin Mitchell has also added 3 photos >which he took on his recent Dutch trip of the organ in >Monickendam. You can see them at >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   John, where, and how do I find the photos? I opened the web page OK, but = I cannot see how or where to open the photos.   Bob        
(back) Subject: toes only From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 22:20:22 -0500 (CDT)   With flat pedalboards, it's quite difficult to use heels, except when going to sharps/flats. Also, many pedalboards of those times had short keys, which would also make it difficult to use heels. With organs of the French baroque/classical period, the so-called pedalboard makes it impossible to use heels. These are the biggest reasons for using mostly toes on early music...it's to "recreate" the sound feasible on the instruments.   Also, with "early fingering/pedaling" there are some interesting nuances/articulations that occur naturally which are lost with a typical legato. There can still be a "singing, musical line"...it just takes on a different character. Choppy, exaggerated articulation is the fault of the organist, not the method.   Organists can gain much insight by listening to a really good instrumentalist or group that performs in historically informed style. The bowings, etc., that they use come from instructional books of the period.   If one approaches something like the opening of Bach's D-major prelude with an understanding of weak and strong beats in the music, plus the restrictions of using heels, the scale can sound like it begins on a "upbeat" following the rest that's in the score. That passage can take on a dimension that is quite delightful when you don't struggle to make it absolutely even/equal notes that are legato.    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City 128' Resultant From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:29:55 -0700 (PDT)   Who the hell cares?   BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote:In a message dated 8/27/2003 4:21:42 AM Eastern = Daylight Time, Rscottcopeland writes:   > How often would you use such nonsense? Having a 42 2/3' stop would be = about as useful as having a Trompette-en-Chamade Celeste.   wouldn't it be a 41-1/3 (twice as long as a 10-2/3)? "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software