PipeChat Digest #3916 - Friday, August 29, 2003
 
Re: New York City
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: toes only
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Re: A fine Birdola
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: historic approach
  by "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com>
Re: Haworth
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
How Reubke did his crescendo
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Mendelssohn and Romanticism
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Haworth
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: New York City
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Wish for an organist
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
"historic" approach
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: A fine Birdola
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: Romantic beasts in NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Calvary Baptist, NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: New York City From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:57:38 -0400   David Baker writes: "St. Agnes, on East 43rd near Grand Central Station is also a > very charming italianate chapel with a fairly new Mander, isn't it, > Malcolm? The church is new after a devastating fire destroyed the old > church and the Aeolian-Skinner therein."   Malcolm replies: All of the above is true, to which I would add that the acoustic is splended. http://www.mander-organs.com/html/st_agnes.html   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2003 10:19 AM Subject: New York City     > I heartily agree with the recommendation of St. Anne & The Holy Trinity > in Brooklyn; for a few years I helped maintain it. Others of interest: > Holy Trinity Episcopal on the east side (88th Street?), where the > present or perhaps immediate past AGO Dean plays; Holy Trinity R.C. on > West 82nd, off Broadway, has a Letourneau from a few years ago - I was > the o/c there a couple of decades ago when the organ was an Estey that > had been redone by Kilgen (oy veh), but the room is glorious and I > would think banging two trash can lids would be musical (on the theory > that the best stop on any organ should be the room it's in); the > present organist won either 2nd or 3rd in a recent improvisation > contest. St. Agnes, on East 43rd near Grand Central Station is also a > very charming italianate chapel with a fairly new Mander, isn't it, > Malcolm? The church is new after a devastating fire destroyed the old > church and the Aeolian-Skinner therein. > > David Baker > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: toes only From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 12:36:48 EDT   In a message dated 8/28/03 11:48:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   I am presuming that this entry is referring to mine that I wrote = the other day. I am not denying the fact that the pedal boards were short and = that heels were unable to be used in that time period. However, we do not have =   organs in America that have short pedal boards that heels could not be = used on. Therefore, we must adapt to what we have. I see your point about the "recreating," but to "recreate" this on an American pedal board is = pointless when one considers the fact of accuracy. Sometimes, it is absolutely necessary to = use a heel and to use all toes is just stupid. In fact, for one to use all = toes in part of the D Major on an American pedal board is disastrous. I knew someone who played the D Major with all toes (not alternating) and screwed = it up a lot. He was a good organist, though the method was all wrong. In = addition, one can easily articulate by using heels when necessary. When I play the = D Major pedal scale, I use all toes. You made it sound as if I used heels. = I may use toes, but they alternate (L R L R L R L R), and therefore, have no = breaks unlike the R R L R L R L L, which is rediculous. As Mark Laubach, a coach = of mine once told me, you can use all toes....as long as you sneak in a heel = here and there (when necessary, of course). Ken Cowan, Alan Morrison, and many =   others agreed. The non-alternating method does not allow for a musical = line and one cannot help but to make it "choppy." I like to think of things orchestrally too, as you had mentioned. I think that's very important for = a proper interpretation. For the alle breve, I think of a chamber orchestra, = though for the beginning part of the prelude, I imagine a disco beat in the back of = my mind. This is to keep it rythymic. (I believe Bach would have liked the = idea of a disco beat, though I am quite sure he would have gotten extremely bored with the music after a matter of minutes). I also keep it flowing and use = rise and fall principles for the musical line. I do not like to overly = romanticise the ending of the prelude either, though I do like to make it a bit = (emphasize a bit) "free" and virtuosic. Now, concerning the matter of flat pedal boards. It is no more difficult to use heels on a concave, radiating = pedal board, in my opinion, than a flat one. You also spoke about "early fingering/pedaling" nuances. I never play Baroque music legato. However, = as I previously mentioned, I do believe that one must adapt to the instrument that they = are playing. I hope this was helpful to those who chose to read it.   Best Wishes, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC       > > Subject: toes only > From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> > Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 22:20:22 -0500 (CDT) > > With flat pedalboards, it's quite difficult to use heels, except when > going to sharps/flats. Also, many pedalboards of those times had short > keys, which would also make it difficult to use heels. With organs of > the French baroque/classical period, the so-called pedalboard makes it > impossible to use heels. These are the biggest reasons for using > mostly toes on early music...it's to "recreate" the sound feasible on > the instruments. > > Also, with "early fingering/pedaling" there are some interesting > nuances/articulations that occur naturally which are lost with a typical > legato. There can still be a "singing, musical line"...it just takes on > a different character. Choppy, exaggerated articulation is the fault of > the organist, not the method. > > Organists can gain much insight by listening to a really good > instrumentalist or group that performs in historically informed style. > The bowings, etc., that they use come from instructional books of the > period. > > If one approaches something like the opening of Bach's D-major prelude > with an understanding of weak and strong beats in the music, plus the > restrictions of using heels, the scale can sound like it begins on a > "upbeat" following the rest that's in the score. That passage can take > on a dimension that is quite delightful when you don't struggle to make > it absolutely even/equal notes that are legato. > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- >      
(back) Subject: Re: A fine Birdola From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:38:13 -0500   I hate to think of the mechanism that runs their Vox Humana stop. Only in Alabama, where all the judges are crazy and all the organs bad-acting.   Bob Lind   ---- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com>   > On the V/2 Hillgreen-Lane in Witness the Resurgence of Faith Tabernacle > in Tolerance, Alabama, there is a Birdola stop available on all five manuals > and pedal. When the knob is drawn, an anamatronic hand strangles a live > chicken, causing it to sputter and squawk. > It is built on historic models, the only concession to modernity = being > the indicator light (there is one for the Zimbelstern, too). It remains the most > musical voice in the instrument.    
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:43:42 -0500   > > >From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> > >We need to continue to strive to bring the composer's genius off the >page as he/she would have heard it. Just imagine people in 100 years >intrepreting music of our time with the philosphy that we were not as >"evolved" and they know a better, more up-to-date, way to interpret >music that is now very specific in what the composer wants. > >Gregory added > >amen! > > > As a composer I'm not interested in how I play my music. I know that all too well. I'm far more interested in how others play my music, because it's always something fresh and unexpected. This extends as far into the future as can be imagined.   I understand the interest in how the music sounded in its own time, but have you noticed that regular symphony orchestras no longer perform the Brandenburg Concertos. The Historically Informed Performance (HIP) movement has diminished the number and quality of Bach performances. Instead you have only early music groups and organists performing Bach to usually small audiences. Symphony orchestras haven't missed him, they have plenty of repertoire. Audiences have missed Bach and the result is that fewer people know his music. HIP has been a disservice to the concert going public because of the dogmatism that states only a HIP performance is culturally valuable. It's a be careful what you wish for situation, the law of unintended consequences is at work here.   Steve Chandler http://www.mp3.com/stevechandler    
(back) Subject: Re: Haworth From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 09:50:47 -0700 (PDT)   Hello Ron,   My Mother always said that the war of the roses never ended.   I'm therefore sorry, but I've never heard of Lancashire.   Regards,   Colin   --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hey Colin: > > Maybe there's something wrong with me, but I could > understand the > Yorkshire accent, much better than the Lancs.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: How Reubke did his crescendo From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:10:07 -0700 (PDT)     > Hello, > > Well I know the answer to the Reubke question of the > crescendo, and Reubke was actually right on the > ball!! > > On some romantic German organs was a progresive > hitch > swell pedal. You gave it a kick, and it began to > open > with a weight attached to the operating rod without > further assistance from the organist. > > Hee hee! > > Isn't scholarship a wonderful thing? > > But it doesn't solve the problem of how to achieve > the > same thing on a modern instrument, does it? > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > --- BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > > i have a recording of an incredible performance of > > john weaver playing the reubke & he accomplishes > the > > same feat. at first i thought maybe his > page-turner > > either held the top note or opened the swell for > > him........ > > > and yes, reubke should have been smacked, too. > > however, unlike reger, reubke was an organist, so > > there's just no excuse for such foolishness. >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn and Romanticism From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 12:35:57 -0500   We find the following in a little-known, recently-unearthed letter from Felix to his sister, which reads in part (pardon his broken Englisch):   "EEfen though I haff put on mein neue Organmeister shoes and haff done all the things that everyone has toldt me from Harold Gleassohn on duh vun = Hand to Harald Bird on zuh uzzer, mein Rectal [typo for "Recital," knowing scholars insist] at St Paul's, London, of the music of Sebastian Brook sounded more like Sebastian Swamp! I wuz horrified at erste but began to like what I heard when it came around in the replay of the acoustich wash. = I haff therefore decided that all Orgel Musik from henceforth should be = played as mit einen Glue-schtick. So gett off your Fanny and practice mit = schticky Fingers and turgid Tempi. Ich'll be home in a few Wochen to check on your progress."   There's more, but it's irrelevant to this discussion. Bob Lind   ----- Original Message -----   > Look carefully at the structure of Mendelssohn's organ music. > Look up the organs he played, the organists for whom he wrote, and = the > organs that THEY played, before deciding that Mendelssohn should be = lumped > together with other Romantics. > What manuscript did he discover at the age of ten, changing him forever? > What did he conduct during his concerts of "antique" music? > Which composers were his models? > Do we have any written accounts of how he intended his organ music, = or > the music of others, to be played? > > Seabstian M. Gluck      
(back) Subject: Re: Haworth From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:40:44 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/03 9:51:23 AM Pacific Daylight Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:   << I'm therefore sorry, but I've never heard of Lancashire. >>   sure you have...   "four thousand holes in blackburn, lancashire." :)  
(back) Subject: Romantic beasts in NYC From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:46:58 -0400   On 8/28/03 11:45 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > I prefer Romantic instruments, but I'm open to seeing anything of interes= t.   Monty: Go to www.holytrinitynyc.org I can=B9t find any organ info there, but Richard Erickson, the Cantor, is a superb person, and surely he has the best and largest romantic organ in an NYC Lutheran church.   Feel free to drop my name if/when you call Rich.   Another (but not romantic) ELCA organ in midtown in the very fine Klais at Saint Peter=B9s. About 40 ranks. Visually stunning, too. Go to www.saintpetersnyc.org. Cantor is Tom Schmidt, a delightful guy. Again, drop my name. (Schedule there is heavy, but it=B9s worth a try.)   Both these churches have extensive music programs, and are very accessible from midtown. Holy Trinity is at 63rd and Central Park West; St. Peter=B9s i= s at 53rd? And Lexington.   You=B9ve got the info on our little Walcker, upon whose bench I=B9ll be glad to park you after mass (12:20ish? on the 7th. As you can see from the spec, it=B9s more baroque than romantic, but you=B9re more than welcome.   Not a lot of Baptist churches in midtown, but there is Calvary on West 57th= ; I have no idea what they have as an organ; it=B9s roughly across the street from Carnegie Hall. Madison Ave. Baptist is farther downtown, and I don=B9t know their organ either, but they=B9re known for fine windows. (American Baptist.)   An absolute must is St. Thomas Episcopal, 53rd and Fifth. Romantic giant u= p front, and Taylor & Boody tracker aft. THE most stunning church interior i= n .. . . well, maybe anywhere. Just go there to adore!   My home phone is 718 884 1893. Be glad to steer you by phone if that helps= .. I=B9m almost always here. A friend and I were planning to attend your recital, but he has to be in Chicago that day, so I=B9m not sure. The state of my physical equilibrium is unpredictable. (And I=B9m in the north Bronx.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: New York City From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:59:24 -0400   On 8/29/03 12:20 AM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> = wrote:   > Is the OHS list of extant organs online? There ARE some wonderful > unknown instruments in Manhattan, but I can never remember where they = are. > That reminds me of the ? Rieger at Holy Trinity Episcopal, far east side = on East 88th, I think. Amazing space, and a very exposed mass of pipework.   I agree with Bud's recommendation to contact Sebastian Gluck (on this = list). If he's available, and has the time, his tour of the vast chambers at = Temple Emanu El is fantastic, and he's a TREMENDSOU host. But there's a vast new organ in Central Synagogue, about 55th and Lexington; Seb is familiar with it, and may be able to refer you to the right people there.   Then there's a fine new Canadian rear-gallery installation at Holy Trinity R.C. Church on the upper WEST side--about 82nd? Just off Broadway.   Oh, and another new Canadian in the chapel of Brick Presbyterian, upper = Park Ave. West gallery; cramped, but decent.   Obviously the BIGGIE (albeit smaller than St. Bart's) is at St. Ignatius Loyola, c. 84th and Park Ave. Your resource person on that is Mander's = man, Malcolm Wechsler. On this list. Excellent animal; west end, about a half mile above the nave floor.   Bud mentioned Smoky Mary's. I don't know what the hospitality is like = there nowadays, but certainly worth a try. West 46th, between 6th and 7th. Marvelous machine.   On ALL these, bring your credentials to facilitate hospitality.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Wish for an organist From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:26:52 -0500   An organist-friend of mine sent me this...   Hope ___________ gets "organized"   That will be the "key" to his success.   Of course he may need to "pipe up" now and then.   But I hope he will not "bellow" to much.   He needs to act "swell".   But not think of himself as too "great".   Just have "positif" thoughts about himself.   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: "historic" approach From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:37:12 -0500 (CDT)     Certainly, using the tunings, sounds, or even having the acoustics for performance of any historical period is the only way to get closest to what a composer heard or intended. However, investigating instrument construction and performance practices can add wonderful insights no matter what type of instrument you play. Obviously, some instruments don't handle certain repertoire too readily...you can't fight the instrument. Also, someone was quite correct in pointing out that historic fingerings/pedalings don't necessarily make a detached sound...there is legato, but not the legato promulgated during the 19th and early 20th century.   And performance practice does not only apply to early music. People are realizing all sorts of stuff by scrutinizing later periods. The info about Mendelssohn is a case in point. When I was a young pup, Gillian Weir also told me about Mendelssohn's letters to his sister in which he eschewed the Romantic style of playing he heard. He also did not have the crescendo pedal and other registration aids often over-used by us when performing 19th Century music of all nations.   It may appear that historically informed practice places restrictions on the performer, but it does not hamper musicality or individuality...it simply places our approach in a context. I've heard just as many boring/unmusical performances with a "historic" approach as I have with the "anything goes" style. So much comes down to common sense. The instrument being played and the acoustics of the space will determine the most suitable repertoire and the style of playing.    
(back) Subject: Re: A fine Birdola From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:42:29 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/2003 11:40:36 AM Central Daylight Time, lindr@core.com writes: On the V/2 Hillgreen-Lane in Witness the Resurgence of Faith Tabernacle > in Tolerance, Alabama, there is a Birdola stop available on all five manuals > and pedal. When the knob is drawn, an anamatronic hand strangles a live > chicken, causing it to sputter and squawk. > It is built on historic models, the only concession to modernity = being > the indicator light (there is one for the Zimbelstern, too). It remains the most > musical voice in the instrument Thats demented! Don't let tree huggers, pollution freaks, or animal = rights activists know about that one! lol   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic beasts in NYC From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:47:30 -0500   Organ at Calvary Baptist Church, 123 W 57 Street, NYC:   I was Radio Engineer there at the time. About 1966-68, we had to replace the 4 Manual Moller. the leaterhs were drying out, there were ciphers, and other probelms which I was not aware of, including the console. The cost and maintenance of keeping a pipe organ in a city with limited air quality sold us on replacing with a first generation Allen Digital Electronic, using the computer cards for alternate voices.   Speakers are placed in the former pipe chambers, with antiphonal speakers on the side walls of the auditorium about 1/2 way back.   Alen reps from Allentown, PA were deeply involved, and we had the priviledge of Carlo Curley help with the voicing. He may have also receoded a demo 33 1/3 or tape for Allen to demonstrate this 'new' instrument. Credit should be given to Paul Liljestrand, organist at Calvary Baptist at the time.   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:46:58 -0400 Subject: Romantic beasts in NYC   > On 8/28/03 11:45 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote: > > > I prefer Romantic instruments, but I'm open to seeing anything of > interest. > > Monty: Go to www.holytrinitynyc.org I can=B9t find any organ = info > there, but Richard Erickson, the Cantor, is a superb person, and surely > he > has the best and largest romantic organ in an NYC Lutheran church. > > Feel free to drop my name if/when you call Rich. > > Another (but not romantic) ELCA organ in midtown in the very fine Klais > at > Saint Peter=B9s. About 40 ranks. Visually stunning, too. Go to > www.saintpetersnyc.org. Cantor is Tom Schmidt, a delightful guy. > Again, > drop my name. (Schedule there is heavy, but it=B9s worth a try.) > > Both these churches have extensive music programs, and are very > accessible > from midtown. Holy Trinity is at 63rd and Central Park West; St. > Peter=B9s is > at 53rd? And Lexington. > > You=B9ve got the info on our little Walcker, upon whose bench I=B9ll be > glad to > park you after mass (12:20ish? on the 7th. As you can see from the > spec, > it=B9s more baroque than romantic, but you=B9re more than welcome. > > Not a lot of Baptist churches in midtown, but there is Calvary on West > 57th; > I have no idea what they have as an organ; it=B9s roughly across the > street > from Carnegie Hall. Madison Ave. Baptist is farther downtown, and I > don=B9t > know their organ either, but they=B9re known for fine windows. = (American > Baptist.) > > An absolute must is St. Thomas Episcopal, 53rd and Fifth. Romantic > giant up > front, and Taylor & Boody tracker aft. THE most stunning church > interior in > .. . . well, maybe anywhere. Just go there to adore! > > My home phone is 718 884 1893. Be glad to steer you by phone if that > helps.. > I=B9m almost always here. A friend and I were planning to attend your > recital, but he has to be in Chicago that day, so I=B9m not sure. The > state > of my physical equilibrium is unpredictable. (And I=B9m in the north > Bronx.) > > Alan >      
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 12:23:01 -0700 (PDT)   Hi All, I've been yahooed again in that I never received the post that started = this thread but would like to add my thoughts regarding Felix and Fannie. = Last week, I made a comment to a friend that I seriously doubted the = world has ever seen any musicians since their passing that could remotely = approach Felix's genius. I do not know much regarding Fannie's abilities, = but have read that were equal to Felix's. Both did have photographic = memories, perfect pitch, spoke several languages, and were excellent = landscape painters. The following story is what caused me to state this. Franz Liszt was a guest at one of the Mendelssohn's musical gatherings. = He appeared in a full Hungarian nationalistic getup and decided to show up = Felix, since after all, he (Liszt) was the greatest pianist in the world. = He played a Hungarian folk song and then improvised a bunch of variations, = each more showy than the next. This was accompanied with plenty of = exaggerated movements, gestures, etc. When he finished, he then asked Felix to play something, with the intent = of showing everyone present that Felix couldn't even approach this great = display of ability. Felix, demurred, and Liszt continued to insist that he = sit down and play. Finally, Felix said he would play something, but only = If Franz Liszt would promise not to be angry. Felix than duplicated the = entire performance, including the exaggerated movements, etc. ..... He = had instanty memorized every note as it was being played ... and of = course, Felix could play the piano just as well as Liszt and probably = better. Then there was the time Fannie played from memory (at the age of 12) the = entire Bach WTC as a birthday present for her mother. If any list members know of anyone since 1847 that could compose, perform = and duplicate these "feats", by this brother and sister, please let me = know, because I too wonder sometimes like TubaM why their greatness is no = longer recognized. Matt         --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software  
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic beasts in NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:39:23 EDT   Yes, if you would like to tour and play a IV/135 instrument in the = manner of modern Romantic Neoclassicism, our instrument at Emanu-El might be of interest. See the stoplist and article on pages 34 through 36 of your = July 2003 American Organist magazine. While we get many visits from Australians, Europeans, and Asians, most Americans don't bother to make an appointment = to see it. As a contrast, you might want to see and play our two projects at = First Presbyterian Church, a IV/85 Skinner-Aeolian-Skinner-Austin-Gluck in the Sanctuary, and a brand new II/6 extension organ (with two 16' stops), = inspired by 18th century English sounds, in Alexander Chapel. I realize that very few people bother to open their Guild magazine and =   read it (many state that they are proud of that fact), but there are = plenty of fine instruments to experience in this city. There is a spectacular = four-manual Roosevelt/Welte here, some unaltered nineteenth century mechanical action organs, and new, smaller organs by living builders that go completely = unnoticed because they get no publicity. Enjoy your trip, but don't miss out by just visiting "the usual suspects." Not all the big instruments are great instruments.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Calvary Baptist, NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:49:08 EDT   One of the great tragedies of American organbuilding history was the destruction of the four-manual Welte at Calvary Baptist. It was one of = their last instruments, hugely complete and brilliantly designed by any intelligent tonal standard, with some of the great minds of organ design and = performance of the day giving input into the design. The service company that tended to it wanted to place it on new soundboards, rip out all of the reed choruses (including the 32' Bombarde) = and strip it of all of its fundamental and warmth, turning it into something = neo-ignorant in accordance with the scant "scholarship" of the time. They ended up destroying the entire thing in favor of an early = digital, which in turn has been removed in favor of another digital with some added =   pipes.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..