PipeChat Digest #3917 - Friday, August 29, 2003
 
Re: Rigidity of Pedal Technique Rules
  by "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com>
Re: organist needing updating
  by "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
Re: speaking of reger...
  by "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Seb
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Calvary Baptist Allen Organ New York
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
orchestras and historic practice
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: Calvary Baptist, NYC
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Mendelssohn
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
romantic beasts in Illinois
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: historic approach and intentions
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: A fine Birdola
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Mendelssohn and Romanticism and  Tuba
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: historic approach
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Haworth
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: historic approach and intentions
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
IRC tonight
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: historic approach and intentions
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Mendelssohn/Liszt
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Mendelssohn/Liszt
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: Mendelssohn/Liszt
  by "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Rigidity of Pedal Technique Rules From: "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:08:55 -0700 (PDT)   My first organ teacher did not advocate "keeping the knees together" = rather feeling with the toes for the note to be played. She also taught = using both toes and heels when playing Bach. My second teacher taught to = keep the knees together at ALL time when playing and use measurements from = keeping the heels together, also, to find pedal notes. The next teacher = said neither worked for him and he developed what was comfortable for him = and thought that best. Back then just about everyone played Bach with = toes and heels, even my teacher in college. I do what is comfortable and = what gets the effect I feel is needed for whatever I am playing. I find = playing the Bach Preludes and Fugues, etc.with just toes uncomfortable, = unless I play like a theater organist with one foot on the expression = pedal and using only one toe. Of course many notes are left out this way, = and the piece is improvised. <grin> For anyone interested in the saga of = the house, we found a carpet/tile dealer who is letting us have ceramic tile and laying it for the price of carpet and = within the money allowed by the insurance company. After playing the = Baldwin on just the concrete, without carpet, it sounded like a concert = grand and we did not want any of the instruments on carpet. Only the = bedroom will have carpet. The hot water tank is in and we have water. We = acquired an air mattress and are back in the house. The tile will be = installed next week and the next the furniture put back in place. We also = found a futon with tapestry mattress we liked and some oriental-type area = rugs. Things seem to be coming together. Lee   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: Dear Chatters: The century-old idea of "put your knees together, press General 4, and play" rarely works for everybody in every situation. As with all precision =   activities, there is a "home stance," whether it is preparing for a = 3-metre dive, playing tennis, addressing home plate before a pitch, or taking a = lineman's stance before a football play. But individual physiology and kinesiology = make for a myriad of variations. While there has been some attempt to standardize the console in accordance with the natural movement of the hip joints, especially the = concavity and radiation of the pedalboard and the relationship of the pedal keys to the = manual keys, there are camps of vehement resistance in which people applaud the occasional physical distortion and strain needed to play flat (or early = converging and convex) pedalboards. Even if we standardize the key-desk, we cannot standardize humans, either on the inside or the outside. Some people simply CANNOT keep their knees together (very small people who MUST spread out just to access the notes, overweight musicians, = athletes with highly developed thighs, organists with joint problems or childhood = ailments such as Polio, musicians with very long legs, etc.), and they MUST develop = a personalized technique that works for them. I think it is more important that they learn to play with the inside of the foot, with good control, than to insist that they tie their knees = together with their belt. In addition, developing good ankle control, rather than = the "toes only, lift-the-foot-and-plunge" technique, will assist most = organists in accurate and comfortable pedal playing.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.  
(back) Subject: Re: organist needing updating From: "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:12:33 -0400   Carla,   I am short too but was taught to keep my knees togther=2E I obviously don= 't do it rigidly when I play 7th's or ocatves, but I find that for shorter intervals like 2nds, 3rds, 4ths, and 5ths my playing is more controlled when my knees are together=2E   Andrew   Original Message: ----------------- From: cc belcanto@brainerd=2Enet Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 14:55:42 -0500 To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: organist needing updating     BlueeyedBear@aol=2Ecom said:   "i was never taught to keep my knees together=2E"     I was just going to ask how it is even possible to do that all the time=2E=   Since my legs are so short, if I kept my knees together, I couldn't reach more than an octave apart comfortably with my feet=2E Surely this can't b= e taken absolutely literally?   Carla C       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www=2Epipechat=2Eorg List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat=2Eorg Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat=2Eorg       -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E      
(back) Subject: Re: speaking of reger... From: "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:18:07 -0400     Colin,   He probably had an assistant operate the swewll pedal=2E   Andrew Original Message: ----------------- From: Colin Mitchell cmys13085@yahoo=2Eco=2Euk Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 13:52:34 -0700 (PDT) To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: speaking of reger=2E=2E=2E     Hello,   Well=2E=2E=2E=2Ewe've established that you're a violent person at least!!   Poor Reger was never an organist and he drank a lot in between bouts of depression and melancholy=2E=2E=2E=2EI guess he suffered=2E   However, Mr Blueeyedbear raises an interesting point of performance, for in the opening bars of the Sonata on the 94th Psalm, Roger Fisher managed to achieve the impossible swell crescendo with both feet fully occupied in his recording on the Great Cathedral Organ Series of many years ago (HMV)   I wondered about this for years!   I tried every which way I knew, including attempting to hitch the swell pedal with my toe whilst holding a note with my heel!   Perhaps a long stick is the answer?   It is infuriating, because that crescendo is just WONDERFUL!   Anyone know any tricks?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- BlueeyedBear@aol=2Ecom wrote:   > not being a reger fan, i don't know which piece this > is, so maybe someone here will=2E=2E=2E >=20 > there's a piece of his that uses double pedal -- > left foot is holding a note low on the pedalboard, > right foot holding a note up high=2E and he calls for > the swell box to CLOSE! of all the nerve=2E=2E=2E if he > were alive now i'd smack him=2E     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder=2Eyahoo=2Ecom "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www=2Epipechat=2Eorg List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat=2Eorg Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat=2Eorg       -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E      
(back) Subject: Romantic beasts in NYC From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:29:55 -0400   The canadian instrument in the chapel at Brick Pres was built by=20 Guilbault-Therien; it is one of the few instruments in the US built by=20=   them and voiced by the late Guy Th=E9rien. Prior to his untimely death=20=   last year, the company was contracted to rebuild the instrument in the=20=   main church, but my understanding from others is that after he died,=20 the company fell into disarray and no longer does new instruments. Can=20=   anyone on this list confirm or correct me on that point? The only=20 other instrument in a church is at Grace Church, White Plains, which I=20=   helped install and maintained for a few years thereafter. Keith Toth,=20=   the O/C at Brick Pres., has a Guilbault-Th=E9rien in his apartment, if I=20=   remember correctly.   If you do want to go to St. Ann & Holy Trinity in Brooklyn, email me=20 and I'll be happy to contact one of the wardens who is a friend. The=20 parish has been through the wringer in the last few years due to clergy=20=   problems, but at last word they were about to hire one, so getting in=20 might not be easy. The instrument is definitely worth the extra=20 effort, however, if you like "romantic beasts" of the E.M. Skinner=20 variety.   David Baker=    
(back) Subject: Seb From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:31:25 -0400   Sounds like Sebastian took an extra cranky pill today. DGB   > I realize that very few people bother to open their Guild magazine > and > read it    
(back) Subject: Calvary Baptist Allen Organ New York From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:40:52 -0500   The Calvary Baptist Allen organ was indeed put on an Allen LP demo. I have a copy of it somewhere. I don't remember if the organist is specified or not; I remember one cut was "When Morning Gilds the Skies," with the announcer saying something to the effect that the sound was not Baroque, but Romantic so that this certain glorious sound accompanied hymns.   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: orchestras and historic practice From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:47:22 -0500 (CDT)   Steve, Blaming historically informed performance for orchestras not playing the Bradenburg concertos is really stretching things a bit. If anything, it probably has more to due with the musicians being unwilling to learn a different approach or contracts that dictate how many musicians must be used, etc. Across Europe and even here in the States, there are plenty of orchestras doing Bach through Beethoven with a more historic approach, and on modern instruments. Even the Chicago Symphony jumped on the band wagon :) Plus there are plenty of period-instrument ensembles doing a good business. Sorry if that's not the case where you live.   In regards to your own music being performed, that's up to you, but I don't think Messiaen would approve of his directions being totally ignored because I decide my way is better.    
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist, NYC From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:30:37 -0600   Sebastian,   So was this around 1966+/-? I may have been wrong about it being a Moller; or it may have been a later addition Moller console.   Is the new Wicks digital + pipes?   I had a whole library of 'Congregational Singing', and also 'Choir' used to produce the syndicated church broadcasts. That 32' Bombarde -- even on tape was a sound and feeling to behold!   Upon dismantling, which I was part of, I believe Keith Bigger took one of the divisions, and perhaps the console (but not 100 % positive).   Are you in touch with Paul Liljestrand or Fred Davies?   David E Colorado Springs   On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 2:04PM -0700, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > One of the great tragedies of American organbuilding history was > the > destruction of the four-manual Welte at Calvary Baptist. It was one of > their last > instruments, hugely complete and brilliantly designed by any > intelligent > tonal standard, with some of the great minds of organ design and > performance of > the day giving input into the design. > The service company that tended to it wanted to place it on new > soundboards, rip out all of the reed choruses (including the 32' > Bombarde) and strip it > of all of its fundamental and warmth, turning it into something > neo-ignorant > in accordance with the scant "scholarship" of the time. > They ended up destroying the entire thing in favor of an early > digital, > which in turn has been removed in favor of another digital with some > added > pipes. > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City > > . > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   David E   davide@theatreorgans.com 719-867-2729  
(back) Subject: Mendelssohn From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:36:56 -0500   Congratulations to those of you who think that Mendelssohn is one of the greats. I couldn't agree more. Hard to play, yes, for those of us who = are not recitalists, but none the less, very inspiring music. Incidentally, thanks to all of you who have replied to my note about the pedal trilling and winding question that I purposed. After I went into = the chamber, the pedal reservoir is winded, one end from the other where the great chest is. The static wind comes up from the blower and comes to a large T, one end going to the main reservoir and the other to the offset. Maybe this is the reason? Still don't have the new swell chest in yet and plan to wind it from the same main reservoir. ( Any thoughts on that idea too)? Thanks for all your help. Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic beasts in NYC From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 17:42:21 -0400   So was it a Moller or a Welte, or perhaps a Welte/Moller?   -WG     > "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote: > > Organ at Calvary Baptist Church, 123 W 57 Street, NYC: > > I was Radio Engineer there at the time. About 1966-68, we had to = replace > the 4 Manual Moller. ... > > David E > > David Evangelides > Colorado Springs, Colorado   And   > <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote: > > One of the great tragedies of American organbuilding history was the > destruction of the four-manual Welte at Calvary Baptist. ... > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City    
(back) Subject: romantic beasts in Illinois From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 17:00:32 -0500   Hi list, One such organ comes to mind is the Hinners' magnum opus- 4 = manual organ that was housed in Presser Hall at IWU. It was built in the 20's = and (as I believe) was the largest organ that they produced? It is now at the Presb. church in Delevan, Il. Huge tab console too. As was the fashion of the times it seems, not much upperwork, some 2' flutes and a couple of mixtures. Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:10:21 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   My cousin David plays an awesome Prelude and Fugue in C minor by Mendelssohn....a difficult work even with a user friendly organ.   The problem seems to be that Mendelssohn was actually coerced into composing for the organ by a publisher desperate for "Voluntaries", which is how the Sonatas started life before they were assembled together, if I recall correctly.   I think the genius of Mendelssohn is readily acknowledged by those who perform in the celebrated Octet, the music for "A midsummer night's dream" and the stupendous and near perfect Violin Concerto   I am not a great fan of his organ music, other than the Preludes and Fugues, and I wonder perhaps, if Mendelssohn was a great fan of the organ, or whether it was simply an instrument he happened to play??   It is in the Preludes and Fugues that we hear, at its best, the influence of Bach.   Interestingly, Reger was a far finer organ composer, but as an orchestral composer, Mendelssohn left Reger for dead. Isn't it fascinating that they were both essentially pianists!!   What does that tell us?   Lastly, a question. Am I the only organist in the world who hates the organ music of Franz Liszt?   I have the funny feeling that I would have hated Liszt as a person.   Give me Chopin any day!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Mattcinnj <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> wrote: > > If any list members know of anyone since (Mendelssohn) 1847 that > could compose, perform and duplicate these "feats", > by this brother and sister, please let me know, > because I too wonder sometimes like TubaM why their > greatness is no longer recognized.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach and intentions From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:15:01 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/2003 8:05:38 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = Gfc234@aol.com writes:   > I'm obviously jaded...This conversation must end. > > >   Do you look good in green?   It can end but it will go on till the last organ is standing i fear.   happy Labor Day.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: A fine Birdola From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 15:15:56 -0700 (PDT)   Ha!   A real bird is nothing.....   There is an old cinema organ in the UK with a real old pit pony on a treadmill for the horses hoofs.   A hot potato and a rubber glove is all you need....   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       When the knob is drawn, an anamatronic > hand strangles a live > > chicken, causing it to sputter and squawk.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn and Romanticism and Tuba From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:23:29 EDT   Oh holy one named Gluck,   Thank you thank you thank you.   May I only add: what organ are you performing on and what is the room = like?   Wayne Fisher once told me in a dry room play the hell out of Vierne. I had =   just performed in Watson Recital Hall on the Balcom and Vaughn. When in cathedrals play it as it was intended.   Isn't life grand....it is all correct and all wrong at the same time.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:26:06 EDT   Yo Steve,   Thank you too!   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Haworth From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:31:47 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/03 12:51:25 PM Eastern Daylight Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:   << I'm therefore sorry, but I've never heard of Lancashire. >>     Sure you have!, You know, the hymn tune for "Lead on O King Eternal"     (after all, this is a pipe organ list populated [mostly] by church = organists)  
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach and intentions From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:55:20 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/2003 5:15:52 PM Central Daylight Time, Keys4bach@aol.com writes: It can end but it will go on till the last organ is standing i fear. I will certainly shake on that! Have a splended holiday!   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 19:14:27 EDT   so did liszt get mad at felix? don't leave us hanging...  
(back) Subject: IRC tonight From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:23:53 -0700   Let's see ... this is ... um ... (takes shoes off, counts toes) ... no, that doesn't work ...   "thirty days hath September" ... nope ...   "Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, Acts, Epistle to the RO-MANS" ... nope .. that's not it either ...   "now I lay me down to sleep" ... nope ...   "there was a young man from Nantucket" ... POSSIBLY (grin) ...   OH!   IT'S FRIDAY!   THAT MEANS IT'S PIPECHATTERY!   9 p.m. U.S. Eastern Daylight Time   Direction on the Pipechat homepage (surely you know how to get THERE) (grin).   Your handy-dandy Towne Crier,   Buuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuud        
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach and intentions From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:29:25 -0700   Um, I DON'T see "historical accuracy" advocates agitating for the revival of the Tremblant Fort (aka "Le Leslie On Spin Cycle") for music of the French baroque era ...   What a shame!   Add the Tremblant Fort to the coupled Grandes Jeux, and VOILA!   You have a Wurlitzer Cinema organ in full cry ...   "Let's All Skate" or "Boogie-Woogie Bugle Boy" recorded on a unaltered Clicquot could make SOMEBODY a LOT of money!   What's that you say?   Meds?   What meds?   Cheers,   Bud   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 8/29/2003 8:05:38 AM Eastern Daylight Time, > Gfc234@aol.com writes: > >> I'm obviously jaded...This conversation must end. >> >> > > > > Do you look good in green? > > It can end but it will go on till the last organ is standing i fear. > > happy Labor Day. > > dale in Florida        
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn/Liszt From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 19:44:23 -0400   "Am I the only organist in the world who hates the organ music of Franz Liszt?"   Nope. I don't like Liszt. I do like Mendelssohn though...   Shell        
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic beasts in NYC From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:09:48 -0400   On 8/29/03 2:47 PM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > Credit should be given to Paul Liljestrand, organist at Calvary Baptist = at the > time.   David: And credit should go to you for contributing this information. Thank you very MUCH! (That's what makes this list so extremely valuable.)   Now, about how a Baptist congregation ends up with a nice Lutheran boy on the bench--well, we'll talk about that another time. Swords at the ready!   Thanks.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn/Liszt From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:30:13 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/2003 6:46:46 PM Central Daylight Time, culverse@westminster.edu writes: "Am I the only organist in the world who hates the organ music of Franz Liszt?" No you're not! I don't particularly care for any of his music. Not even the = Transcendental Etudes for piano. At first they are quite catchy, but 2 minutes later I = find my ears getting tired, every time around. His developmental techniques = annoy me!   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Mendelssohn/Liszt From: "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:46:04 -0400   No. Can't say I hate it, but I don't really care for it. Mari -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Gfc234@aol.com Sent: Friday, August 29, 2003 8:30 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Mendelssohn/Liszt     In a message dated 8/29/2003 6:46:46 PM Central Daylight Time, culverse@westminster.edu writes: "Am I the only organist in the world who hates the organ music of Franz Liszt?" No you're not! I don't particularly care for any of his music. Not even the Transcendental Etudes for piano. At first they are quite catchy, but 2 minutes later I find my ears getting tired, every time around. His developmental techniques annoy me!   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:49:08 -0400   Hi Colin and List,   I am sure you can not possibly be alone in hating the Organ music of = Liszt, but I cannot join you in that. "Ad nos" is, for me, thrilling from the = first note to the last. I don't think I will ever forget Thomas Trotter's performance of it in the Princeton University Chapel a few years ago, or Felix Hell's performance at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Newark. (The latter can be had on recording, via www.ohscatalog.org.) The B-A-C-H is only a = bit behind that in excitement for me. Wasn't it W. S. Gilbert who wrote: "I = have a little Liszt?"   I think I share your feeling about expecting to hate Liszt, the man. I too am mad about Chopin, but between him and Liszt, it is a bit of apples and oranges. One gains little by comparing them, and much by just enjoying = them both.   Cheers from over here,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2003 6:10 PM Subject: Re: Mendelssohn     > Hello, > <Significant Snip> > > Lastly, a question. Am I the only organist in the > world who hates the organ music of Franz Liszt? > > I have the funny feeling that I would have hated Liszt > as a person. > > Give me Chopin any day!! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- Mattcinnj <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> wrote: > > > > If any list members know of anyone since > (Mendelssohn) 1847 that > > could compose, perform and duplicate these "feats", > > by this brother and sister, please let me know, > > because I too wonder sometimes like TubaM why their > > greatness is no longer recognized. > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 19:57:33 -0500   At 08:49 PM 8/29/2003 -0400, Malcolm wrote: >Hi Colin and List, > >I am sure you can not possibly be alone in hating the Organ music of = Liszt, >but I cannot join you in that. "Ad nos" is, for me, thrilling from the = first >note to the last. I don't think I will ever forget Thomas Trotter's >performance of it in the Princeton University Chapel a few years ago     <snip>   I'm with Malcolm on this. But was the performance you're thinking of perhaps played be Ken Cowan instead? (at OHS a few years ago -- huge original AEolian organ which narrowly escaped being thrown away as "unfashionable" some years earlier)   While I might be getting my conventions/universities mixed up, I will = NEVER forget Ken's performance of Ad nos that night.   Tim (now Messaien, OTOH, is one I could do without ever hearing again, but that's likely to start a WHOLE 'nother discussion...<g>)