PipeChat Digest #3918 - Saturday, August 30, 2003
 
Re: Wish for an organist
  by "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net>
Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: IRC tonight
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Romantic Beasts in NY
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Re: Lancashire. Was 'Haworth'
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: train whistles (very LITTLE organ content)
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: train whistles (very LITTLE organ content)
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns)
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Wish for an organist From: "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:30:26 -0400   ...... and, of course, the "old chestnut" organ jokes:   The pedal line in a score is "footnotes", which sometimes are played on the "Shoehorn" stop; the result is "Sole music" ..........   Hiding now .......... Ed, in Maine   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2003 2:26 PM Subject: Wish for an organist     > An organist-friend of mine sent me this... > > Hope ___________ gets "organized" > > That will be the "key" to his success. > > Of course he may need to "pipe up" now and then. > > But I hope he will not "bellow" to much. > > He needs to act "swell". > > But not think of himself as too "great". > > Just have "positif" thoughts about himself. > > Alicia Zeilenga > Sub-Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:09:52 -0400   "now Messaien, OTOH, is one I could do without ever hearing again, but that's likely to start a WHOLE 'nother discussion..."   Yep! I love Messiaen! The best Messiaen I ever heard was played by Olivier Latry. However, I have met Hans Ola Ericsson, who I am told is considered the world's Messiaen scholar. He did not play Messiaen when I saw him; he played Brahms.   Shelley      
(back) Subject: Re: IRC tonight From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:24:59 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/03 7:20:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << "there was a young man from Nantucket" >>   Speaking of which, did you know that any limerick can be sung to the tune "Dennis"?? ("Blest be the tie that binds" for those who don't recognize = hymn tune names)  
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:32:44 -0700   Messiaen, as I've said many times, requires the context for which it was composed: the Organ Mass, in a reverberant church ... yes, it is POSSIBLE to play Messiaen's music on other than a Cavaille-Coll "sound," and Messiaen himself DID it, BUT ...   His music is the logical extension of a long line of mystical French organists / composers / improvisers, and they're ALL tied to the Mass. Messiaen was a devout Roman Catholic; you can't divorce his music from the Church ... at least not successfully (in my mind).   To hear something like the Pentecost Mass, or even The Celestial Banquet in a concert-hall just isn't the same.   It's demanding music for the listener, granted, but WELL-worth it.   I had to study an awful lot of Tournemire, Vierne, Widor, and Langlais before I could penetrate Messiaen's aesthetic, and it took YEARS.   Cheers,   Bud   Shelley Culver wrote: > "now Messaien, OTOH, is one I could do without ever hearing again, but > that's likely to start a WHOLE 'nother discussion..." > > Yep! I love Messiaen! The best Messiaen I ever heard was played by > Olivier Latry. However, I have met Hans Ola Ericsson, who I am told is > considered the world's Messiaen scholar. He did not play Messiaen when I > saw him; he played Brahms. > > Shelley > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:46:28 -0500   At 07:57 PM 8/29/2003 -0500, I wrote: While I might be getting my conventions/universities mixed up, I will = NEVER forget Ken's performance of Ad nos that night. <snip>   Now I've found the correct Organ Handbook, and I am indeed confusing my Universities. It was at Duke, at OHS 2001.   Whoops...<g>   Tim (who is happily re-listening to Tom Murray's Mendelssohn at the moment, = BTW)    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:48:40 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/2003 8:29:09 PM Central Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: you can't divorce his music from the Church ... at least not successfully (in my mind). You mean to tell me that you would't enjoy hearing Dieu Parmi Nous or Outbursts of Joy on a 100 rank concert organ?       Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:50:21 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/2003 8:29:09 PM Central Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: His music is the logical extension of a long line of mystical French organists / composers / improvisers, and they're ALL tied to the Mass. His music is a logical EVOLUTION. Do some score study and analysis and = see what you come up with. Genius is the answer.   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn - Messiaen From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:57:55 -0700   Not really ... I'd rather hear them at Midnight Mass (grin)   Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 8/29/2003 8:29:09 PM Central Daylight Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > you can't divorce his music from > the Church ... at least not successfully (in my mind). > > You mean to tell me that you would't enjoy hearing Dieu Parmi Nous or > Outbursts of Joy on a 100 rank concert organ? > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > M.M. Organ Performance > Northwestern University > Director of Music and Organist > St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL > 847.332.2788 home > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com <http://gfc234@aol.com/>        
(back) Subject: Romantic Beasts in NY From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 18:58:31 -0700 (PDT)   >If you do want to go to St. Ann & Holy Trinity in Brooklyn, email me and I'll be happy to contact one of the wardens who is a friend. The parish has been through the wringer in the last few years due to clergy   problems, but at last word they were about to hire one, so getting in might not be easy. The instrument is definitely worth the extra effort, however, if you like "romantic beasts" of the E.M. Skinner variety.< >   St Ann and Holy Trinity is a truly wonderful instrument. Many years ago an old friend of mine used to practice there when the church was closed down and rented to the "Church Army In the USA". They used a Hammond and didn't even use the wonderful old Skinner. A number of years ago it was re-opened as an Episcopal church combining two congregations and interest was again taken in the organ. I played it a few years back and was amazed at what a wonderful organ it was even though rough. I lost track and only recently learned that my old friend, John Rodgers who lived just down the street on Montague had died and left the bulk of his estate to the church for use in organ restoration. What a wonderful thing!!!! He was a modest man of extremely modest means who lived a simple life, never spending more than he had to on anything. He had been the chief editor of H. W. Gray and later with Belwin Mills. He had been for many years organist at the St. Paul the Apostle Church by Lincoln Center. The restoration work is being done by John Randolph of Leonia, NJ who is the curator of our organ at St. Peter's, Westchester Square. He is one of the finest organ men in the U.S.and the St. Anns, Holy Trinity organ promises to be once again a landmark instrument on the New York scene, if his ideas for our organ are any indication. I'm looking forward to the Thomas Murray concert next month.   Ken Potter       =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Kenneth Potter, Organist/Director of Music St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square, Bronx, NY 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, Austin Op. 2097 at: = http://www.nycago.org/Organs/html/StPetersEpBronx.html Randolph Organ Company, curators =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Lancashire. Was 'Haworth' From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 23:31:16 -0400   > Sure you have!, You know, the hymn tune for "Lead on O King Eternal" > >   Written by some smart guy, I theenk.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh        
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles (very LITTLE organ content) From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 21:27:40 EDT   In a message dated 8/26/03 6:05:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes:   << Can someone explain why train and organ enthusiasm are often found together? ;) >>   It's not just "train and organ", it seems to be "almost anything and = organ". I'm surprised at the number of people I known, sometimes for years, and = some little remark will start a train discussion, ranging from ones they've = ridden on, which ones they've seen, excursions they been on, museums they've = visited, how large their own layout is (then is arguements about which scale is better, which brand is better, etc). I think people don't realize how = widespread the enthusiasm for trains is because it's not the type of thing people = talk about all the time, and train spotting is usually done solo (duet?). = Unless you happen to see someone at the hobby shop or museum or train show, you might =   never know they also share our passion.   Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: train whistles (very LITTLE organ content) From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 21:27:40 EDT   In a message dated 8/26/03 6:05:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes:   << Can someone explain why train and organ enthusiasm are often found together? ;) >>   It's not just "train and organ", it seems to be "almost anything and = organ". I'm surprised at the number of people I known, sometimes for years, and = some little remark will start a train discussion, ranging from ones they've = ridden on, which ones they've seen, excursions they been on, museums they've = visited, how large their own layout is (then is arguements about which scale is better, which brand is better, etc). I think people don't realize how = widespread the enthusiasm for trains is because it's not the type of thing people = talk about all the time, and train spotting is usually done solo (duet?). = Unless you happen to see someone at the hobby shop or museum or train show, you might =   never know they also share our passion.   Richard  
(back) Subject: Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns) From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 19:55:15 -0500   Interesting. I was crazy about Langlais organ works in my late teens and early 20s. I heard him in recital one evening when I was still 17 and went to his master class the next day and had him autograph my copy of Suite Medievale and maybe a couple other pieces of his. What a treat. He played the Finale from his first Organ Symphony in that recital and I bought a = copy the next day, started learning it immediately, and played it in recital = some time later. As I explored more 20th-century music, I tired of all his = added notes and other cheap thrills, and as far as I was concerned, his stock plummeted almost to nonexistence.   I would still play: 1) Incantation for Holy Saturday 2) Prelude on an Anthem 3) Song of Peace 4) Heroic Song   There may be one or two others that I can't recall offhand. But then I stopped buying his music around 1963. I played his Piece in Free Form that year with a string group, and that's just about (and should have been) the last thing of his I ever bought. (I say "should have been" because I remember with much regret buying an early prelude and fugue of his, around 1985, that simply couldn't stay in a key center longer than a measure or two; a great example of a decapitated chicken running around in a French swoon.) Last year I heard a rather unseasoned young organist bully his way through Langlais's setting of the tune "Coronation," and I could barely stand the piece and the manner in which it was played. I guess they fully deserved one another, now that I think back on it. What disgusting machinations--and in the name of what, I ask? Some silly stunt to see how ugly and disrespectful one can be with a tune? But the kid loved the piece and couldn't wait to force it on his congregation, knowing in advance that they would hate it. Ah, youth.   In "modern" progression, after added 6ths I suppose one could argue that = we were subjected to major 7ths, then 9ths, 11ths, 13ths, and ultimately any combination of these or all of the above. From there in 20th-century experimentation one might lean on the keys with one's forearm or bring in pieces of wood that can press down any number of notes simultaneously.   As to Langlais, give me his leaner, cleaner style when an open 5th at the outset or peroration of a phrase or movement was a thing of beauty and a statement that held much more power than a multiplicity of added notes = ever could. Much of this has to do with the wondrous aura of Gregorian chant = and medieval music that he looked to. I have to think that those two types/styles/eras in music history will easily outlast all the hyper-activity and foolishness of the 20th century.   Okay--last week I blasted Karg-Elert. Now Langlais. Please tell me what great pieces of his I have obviously overlooked.   Still more than willing to learn and explore, Bob Lind       ----- Original Message ----- From: Walter Greenwood <walterg@nauticom.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 5:13 PM Subject: RE: Atlantic City - party horns     > The experience of music is a subjective thing, eh? I've always felt = that 6th chords were EXTRA satisfying! Apparently Langlais did, too, seeing = how he ended up on them so often. > > -WG