PipeChat Digest #3920 - Saturday, August 30, 2003
 
RE: Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns)
  by "Bill Sebring" <baircub@austin.rr.com>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "Mura Kievman" <mura@speakeasy.net>
Langlais
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Vertically, follicley and aged challenged
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: Mendelssohn
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Messiaen
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: Calvary Baptist Allen Demo Disc
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Langlais
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Calvary Baptist Allen Demo Disc
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Naji Hakim
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: mess and liz and mendel
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
RE: Romantic beasts in NYC Paul Liljestrand
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
liszt ad nos
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns)
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Leather deterioration in NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: liszt ad nos
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Messiaen on Messiaen
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: liszt ad nos
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Leather deterioration in NYC
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: Leather deterioration in NYC
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns) From: "Bill Sebring" <baircub@austin.rr.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 11:29:26 -0500   Colin, my other half can tell you, I can become a chin quivering, tear gushing wreck at the drop of a hat...the right music can do that to me.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2003 11:23 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns)     Hello, I once heard a stupendous performance of Ligeti's "Volumina"....it was...erm...."Voluminous".   Trouble is, all these normally respectable and very competent organists kept snorting, whilst some started drowning in their own tears.   It's goo to know that at least ONE piece of modern music has the power to move people.....even if it was outside the church and the nearest bus stop.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote: > If you're interested in seeing what folks think > about 20th century organ > music in which calls for such techniques as "leaning > on the keys with one's > forearm", ask what people think about Ligeti's > "Volumina". Hear that piece more than > once, and you might begin to form a better opinion > of Langlais!     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 11:30:52 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Brent, > Well it's absolutely wonderful--a dream come true. Question: what = is > the signature piece I hear when it first comes on, with the trumpet = stop? > Randy Runyon     The background music on the preroll piece heard when connecting to = ORGANLive is a snippet of an improvisation by Jonathan A. Tuuk on the organ of St. Adalbert's Cathedral in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The entire recording can = be heard within the broacast. Brent Johnson ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand http://www.organlive.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic beasts in NYC From: "Mura Kievman" <mura@speakeasy.net> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 12:46:37 -0400   At 10:18 AM 8/30/2003 -0400, you wrote: >On 8/29/03 4:29 PM, "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> wrote: > > > The [St. Anne's and the Holy Trinity] parish has been through the > wringer in > > the last few years due to clergy problems, but at last word they were > about to > > hire one, so getting in might not be easy. > >The "last few years"? Have you heard the stories from the 1940s, 1950s, >1960s, and 1970s?     According to this morning's NY Times, it is no longer a church ... part of =   it is being turned into classrooms. This was news to me and I only live a =   few blocks away.      
(back) Subject: Langlais From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 10:05:22 -0700   I must have missed the beginning of this thread ... things are a little crazy around here, with the move to San Diego in progress and all ... I should be safely ensconced on University Ave. by Sunday night, if all goes well.   Anyway ... Langlais ... again ... CONTEXT. Unlike Messiaen, most of Langlais' music is immersed in the spirit of the Solesmes Reform of Gregorian Chant, like Tournemire before him. Knowledge of the Chant has persisted longer in France, in part due to its use in the solfege classes at the Conservatoire.   French Catholics in general, though, would hear the Langlais pieces with different ears, since the chant hymns are still sung in France ... much like an American protestant congregation hearing a hymn-prelude on "Just As I Am", for example.   IF the pieces are performed outside the Mass, it would probably be helpful to have a verse of the Chant sung beforehand, as is sometimes done with the Couperin Masses (and others). With modern computer music engraving, it's simple enough to provide the melodies in modern notation so the whole AUDIENCE can sing them. An explanation of the part of the Mass they're intended for, and also the spirit of the feast-day (if there is one) would be helpful.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Vertically, follicley and aged challenged From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 13:12:08 -0400   As I said, Colin, to each his own. ;-)   -WG   > "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > > Hello, > > I thought you were referring to me until I spotted the > last word! > > :) > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > --- Walter Greenwood <walterg@nauticom.net> wrote: > > To each his own > >(You gotta have some > > respect for a short, bald, old guy with a meager > > salary who had so much success with > > young women!)    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 12:13:25 -0500   Hello, Colin,   When I have discussed Liszt with my colleagues, I have gotten mixed responses. Personally, I get tired of his music rather quickly, but I never get tired of Chopin's Etudes.     Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"   > > Lastly, a question. Am I the only organist in the > world who hates the organ music of Franz Liszt? > > I have the funny feeling that I would have hated Liszt > as a person. > > Give me Chopin any day!!      
(back) Subject: Messiaen From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 13:17:34 -0400   Does that mean the rest of us are restricted to interpreting it = improperly?   -WG   > Hans Ola Ericsson? I can't say I heard of him. However, Jon Gillock, a > Phillip Truckenbrod Artist, is the only living human being that is = approved by > Messiean's living family to be able to interpret his music in the proper = manner. > I remember once participating in a master class with him on = Mendelssohn..... > Anyway, he does teach at Juilliard, though he lives in France. Years = ago, > when he lived in the US, my teacher, Stephen Williams, studied with him. > > Sincerely, > Christopher J. Howerter, SPC    
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist Allen Demo Disc From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 10:31:49 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Re: Calvary Baptist Allen Demo Disc     > George Markey was the organist.   No, it was Robert Elmore. (There is an Allen LP of George Markey playing a dedication recital, but it was at Trinity Lutheran in Davenport, IA)   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: Langlais From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 13:59:01 EDT   In Re: to M. Langlais and others:   I think what Bud says has merit, take the music out of context and it may seem strange. Mysticism has it's mystics but their expression is none the less valid. I also agree that a steady diet of any one type of music can wear thin. 20th and 21st Century genre's of music go a long way. These should be salt and pepper in a recital not the main course. I like to hear a rousing improvisation especially French, but not all day. it's too heavy. This is program music for certain parts of the Mass, some soft and contemplative, some jarring and loud. It's picture painting in music. Would I like to listen to it all day, the answer is NO! Some samples? Yes! Steady diet? NO! It all boils down to good taste in concert planning.   Dissonance for dissonance sake? I think it's bad music. If it's cohearant theme wise, makes some sense, I'll give it a listen. If it's well crafted, and not just noise, I might even give it another listen. I have taste too. Some of the stuff out there is just plain junk, and some is average to good. I hate cacophony and noise. Hindemith's Sonatas grow on you, well crafted, and make sense harmonically, and melodically, while some of it sounds like it was composed by the tail of a jackass, inked and slapping against composition paper. How's that for a picture? I wasn't refering to Herr Hindemith, but to other wanabees.   Nuff said,   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist Allen Demo Disc From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 14:42:47 EDT   How very right you are ... the Calvary one WAS Robert Elmore; he even = plays one of his own pieces, as I remember. Mea culpa...  
(back) Subject: Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 15:15:45 EDT   In a message dated 8/30/2003 12:18:31 PM Central Daylight Time,=20 walterg@nauticom.net writes:   > >However, Jon Gillock, a Phillip Truckenbrod Artist, is the only living=20 > human being that is approved by Messiean's living family to be able to int= erpret=20 > his music in the proper manner. I remember once participating in a master=20 > class with him on Mendelssohn..... > > Anyway, he does teach at Juilliard, though he lives in France. Years ag= o, > >when he lived in the US, my teacher, Stephen Williams, studied with him. > > > >Sincerely, > >Christopher J. Howerter, SPC >=20 Some would beg to differ re: Jon Gillock's reputed status as "the only livin= g=20 human being that is approved by Messiaen's living family to be able to=20 interpret his music in the proper manner." No offense to Dr. Jon Gillock. H= e is a=20 wonderful musician IMO; I was privileged to witness him perform in New York=20 City during the 1989 AGO Regional Convention.=20   Nevertheless, it was Olivier Messiaen, himself, who designated Naji Hakim as= =20 his successor at l'=E9glise de la Trinit=E9, Paris, just prior to his death= .. =20   Naji Hakim, for those who may not know, was born in Beirut in 1955. After=20 completing his Law degree (satisfying his father), Nakim studied organ with=20= Jean=20 Langlais, and at the Conservatoire National Sup=E9rieur de Musique de Paris,= in=20 the classes of Roger Boutry, Jean-Claude Henry, Marcel Bitsch, Rolande=20 Falcinelli, Jacques Cast=E9r=E8de and Serge Nigg, where he obtained first pr= izes in=20 harmony, counterpoint, fugue, organ, improvisation, analysis and orchestrati= on.=20   He also received first prizes at the International Organ Competitions at=20 Haarlem, Beauvais, Lyon, Nuremberg, St. Albans, Strasbourg and Rennes, the=20 composition prize of the "Amis de l'Orgue" for his Symphonie en Trois Mouvem= ents=20 (Paris, 1984), and the first prize in the International Competition for Orga= n=20 Composition, in memory of Anton Heiller for The Embrace of Fire (Collegedale= ,=20 Tennessee, 1986).=20   In 1991, he received the Prix de Composition Musicale Andr=E9 Caplet from th= e=20 Acad=E9mie des Beaux-Arts. His many published compositions include instrumen= tal,=20 symphonic and vocal works. From 1985 until 1993, Nakim was principal organis= t=20 of the Basilique du Sacr=E9-Coeur, Paris.   Cordially, Dale G. Rider    
(back) Subject: Naji Hakim From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 15:29:08 -0400   I'm so glad Naji Hakim got pulled into this conversation!   A couple weeks ago I had the extreme pleasure of hearing his Seattle Organ = Concerto as performed by the Chautauqua Symphony and Jared Jacobsen = (organist). It is one amazing piece of music. But if you don't like = Messiaen...you probably won't like it. My mom went to this particular = concert, and she went in expecting something along the lines of Bach. (Of = course, in her mind, who else wrote organ music?) She was, needless to = say, sorely disappointed. I knew it was modern and was prepared for = something Messiaen-like. It's very different from any Messiaen I've ever = listened to! But it was fabulous nonetheless.=20   But I like modern music...   Shelley       >>> ProOrgo53@aol.com 08/30/03 3:15 PM >>> In a message dated 8/30/2003 12:18:31 PM Central Daylight Time,=20 walterg@nauticom.net writes:   > >However, Jon Gillock, a Phillip Truckenbrod Artist, is the only = living=20 > human being that is approved by Messiean's living family to be able to = interpret=20 > his music in the proper manner. I remember once participating in a = master=20 > class with him on Mendelssohn..... > > Anyway, he does teach at Juilliard, though he lives in France. Years = ago, > >when he lived in the US, my teacher, Stephen Williams, studied with = him. > > > >Sincerely, > >Christopher J. Howerter, SPC >=20 Some would beg to differ re: Jon Gillock's reputed status as "the only = living=20 human being that is approved by Messiaen's living family to be able to=20 interpret his music in the proper manner." No offense to Dr. Jon Gillock. = He is a=20 wonderful musician IMO; I was privileged to witness him perform in New = York=20 City during the 1989 AGO Regional Convention.=20   Nevertheless, it was Olivier Messiaen, himself, who designated Naji Hakim = as=20 his successor at l'=E9glise de la Trinit=E9, Paris, just prior to his = death. =20   Naji Hakim, for those who may not know, was born in Beirut in 1955. = After=20 completing his Law degree (satisfying his father), Nakim studied organ = with Jean=20 Langlais, and at the Conservatoire National Sup=E9rieur de Musique de = Paris, in=20 the classes of Roger Boutry, Jean-Claude Henry, Marcel Bitsch, Rolande=20 Falcinelli, Jacques Cast=E9r=E8de and Serge Nigg, where he obtained first = prizes in=20 harmony, counterpoint, fugue, organ, improvisation, analysis and orchestrat= ion.=20   He also received first prizes at the International Organ Competitions = at=20 Haarlem, Beauvais, Lyon, Nuremberg, St. Albans, Strasbourg and Rennes, = the=20 composition prize of the "Amis de l'Orgue" for his Symphonie en Trois = Mouvements=20 (Paris, 1984), and the first prize in the International Competition for = Organ=20 Composition, in memory of Anton Heiller for The Embrace of Fire (Collegedal= e,=20 Tennessee, 1986).=20   In 1991, he received the Prix de Composition Musicale Andr=E9 Caplet from = the=20 Acad=E9mie des Beaux-Arts. His many published compositions include = instrumental,=20 symphonic and vocal works. From 1985 until 1993, Nakim was principal = organist=20 of the Basilique du Sacr=E9-Coeur, Paris.   Cordially, Dale G. Rider    
(back) Subject: Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 14:34:34 -0500       Dale Rider wrote:   > > Some would beg to differ re: Jon Gillock's reputed status as "the only > living human being that is approved by Messiaen's living family to be > able to interpret his music in the proper manner." No offense to Dr. > Jon Gillock. He is a wonderful musician IMO; I was privileged to > witness him perform in New York City during the 1989 AGO Regional > Convention. > > Nevertheless, it was Olivier Messiaen, himself, who designated Naji > Hakim as his successor at l'=E9glise de la Trinit=E9, Paris, just prior =   > to his death.     Didn't Jennifer Bate get some sort of imprimatur from Messiaen too?   I think the truth of the matter may have been that Messiaen designated several people as the only person able to interpret his music properly. = <g>   John Speller          
(back) Subject: Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 15:40:24 EDT   In a message dated 8/30/2003 2:34:42 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes:   > > Didn't Jennifer Bate get some sort of imprimatur from Messiaen too? > > I think the truth of the matter may have been that Messiaen designated > several people as the only person able to interpret his music properly. = <g> > > John Speller > > Come on, folks! Let's not PAINT the Maestro as senile, bungling or = idiotic! After all, he did not have to be carried away from La Trinite ranting, screaming or yelling. When he left he left with dignity and respect. If = he, indeed, patted the head of even a dozen (that magical, biblical number) who had = the opportunity to play for him, it is Hakim who got the job and, to me, that = says plenty.   Dale Rider (again)    
(back) Subject: Re: mess and liz and mendel From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 15:44:33 EDT   In a message dated 8/30/2003 11:00:20 AM Central Daylight Time,=20 gksjd85@direcway.com writes:   > I=E2=80=99m hoping that repertoire swells.   How positiv and great; may it swell, indeed. It shall have to, for me as=20 well; Hakim's music seems to require quatro-focals!!!!   d    
(back) Subject: RE: Romantic beasts in NYC Paul Liljestrand From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 14:03:58 -0600   Thanks Andrew for the update on Paul Liljestrand. We worked and worshipped together for many, many years. I learned most of my technique by watching and listening to him.   You've also confirmed that air quality in NYC at that time was a factor in the deterioration of the pipe organ. Wouldn't the air have affected other mechanical devices and machinery in NY as well?   You are also correct in assuming that Calvary was in good financial condition. Through an Organ Fund, we raised the approx $125,000 for the Allen in about 1 year.   David E     On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 5:23AM -0700, Andrew Mead wrote: > Up here in Toronto I met Paul Liljestrand while he was at my church for > a > weekend where our completely rebuilt organ was opened-up with him as > guest > organist. This was in 1991 and there was reference made about the organ > back > in his church and the pipe organ that was there originally. I was told, > not > necessarily by him, that the company servicing the pipe organ had > indicated > that poor NYC air quality had compromised the pneumatics of the organ > so > much the organ needed complete rebuilding or better yet, new > mechanisms. In > the end they decided to ditch the organ in favour of an electronic. > There > was also a woman who came from Calvary as part of the team for this > weekend. > I had the feeling this church did not have financial problems at any > time > that would have prevented them from maintaining their pipe organ. > AjM     David E   International Bible Society davide@theatreorgans.com  
(back) Subject: liszt ad nos From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 16:40:49 EDT   i haven't heard the recordings mentioned, but my favorite is that of demessieux. talk about a searing performance! sounds like she was = wrenching the organ off the wall!!!  
(back) Subject: Re: Langlais and added 6ths (was Atl. City party horns) From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 16:45:01 EDT   In a message dated 8/30/03 8:12:18 AM Pacific Daylight Time, DERREINETOR@aol.com writes:   << If you're interested in seeing what folks think about 20th century = organ music in which calls for such techniques as "leaning on the keys with = one's forearm", ask what people think about Ligeti's "Volumina". Hear that = piece more than once, and you might begin to form a better opinion of Langlais! = >>   i love volumina. if CDs could wear out, i would have gone through at = least 3 copies of the volumina recording i have.  
(back) Subject: Leather deterioration in NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 16:57:32 EDT   There are pipe organs from the same era (1920s) in NYC that operated = on their original leather for 70 or more years before being releathered. GOOD leather lasts 50-70 years, even in this city. Leather costs less than junking an organ and buying a replacement that lasts half as long. I just saw an early electropneumatic organ from the 1890s on its = original leather, here in the city. Organs are destroyed and replaced because = that's what people want, not because it was necessary.  
(back) Subject: Re: Messiaen, Jon Gillock & Naji Hakim From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 13:58:27 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> > Didn't Jennifer Bate get some sort of imprimatur from Messiaen too? > > I think the truth of the matter may have been that Messiaen designated > several people as the only person able to interpret his music properly. <g> >   Well, yes. The notes to the old Schwann complete (as of 1971) Messiaen = say:   "In Almut Roessler Messiaen sees the ideal interpreter of his music, and = it was on his recommendation that she was chosen to play the organ when the Erasmus Prize was conferred on him in Amsterdam in June 1971."   Better I suppose to be generous than stinting in praise of your = interpreters (even if it confuses the rest of us).   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: liszt ad nos From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 14:10:34 -0700       > i haven't heard the recordings mentioned, but my favorite is that of > demessieux. talk about a searing performance! sounds like she was wrenching the > organ off the wall!!!   I'll hold out for the live performance by Marie-Madeleine Durufle at St. Thomas, New York, October 16, 1966. It was available for a while on a Humbletunes CD, and there is talk that it may be reissued in the near future, this time on a CD made from the actual session master tape rather than a copy.   I heard the recital and it lived in my memory for 30 years as the greatest organ performance I had heard up to that point in my life. When the CD miraculously appeared, I was amazed to hear that it was perhaps even = better than I remembered it. Mme.'s accuracy is almost unbelievable, and it is by no means a "careful" or restrained performance. It is, however, a very elegant one, and she doesn't subject the piece to the exaggerations one frequently hears (and which, to my ears, make the whole thing seem quite incoherent and, well, Lisztian).   I remember the Demessieux fondly (and also the very slow Cochereau from = the 1950s), but it's Mme. Durufle that I return to. Matter of fact, I'm going = to go listen to it now.   Michael Fox      
(back) Subject: Re: Messiaen on Messiaen From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 17:22:29 EDT   It is actually possible that the composer thought that they were ALL = fine interpreters of his music. He didn't like the way HE interpreted his own music (play as I write, = not as I play). Had he praised them all at the same time, then we might wonder. But if = he lauded their interpretations at different points in his career, as THEIR careers emerged, then his sentiments may be taken as real. The very nature of the word "interpretation" clearly indicates that = there can be no "best" or "foremost" interpreter. There are few absolutes in the =   realm of art, or do we all wish to be judged by one set of standards? And = who shall SET those standards? Certainly, the composer in question had fluid standards regarding his own works.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: liszt ad nos From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 17:24:18 EDT   Try Simon Preston at Hull City Hall  
(back) Subject: Re: Leather deterioration in NYC From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 17:41:31 -0400   While I rarely agree with TubaMagna, I rarely feel moved to spout.   Stand back!   "There are pipe organs from the same era (1920s) in NYC that operated on their original leather for 70 or more years before being releathered."   TRUE!     "GOOD leather lasts 50-70 years, even in this city."   USUALLY FALSE!       If one knew his history he would know that the process used in tanning the =   leather used in organs in the 1920's changed for a variety of reasons.   As a result these 1920's organs are sited for long-life...because they = have the old-style tanning.   Where did I ever get this information? From the design director of a = major pipe organ builder who has since joined yet another major pipe organ firm at = the demise of the first.   He was explaining why so many of the 1920's organs by the comopany were = still running on original leather when instruments from the 1940's were in = desperate, desperate need of releathering.   Because GOOD leather of today still can't match the real GOOD leather of = the 1920's and prior.   You know, I read the AGO magazine, and we all know there is a lot of = solid, good information in there...and a lot of foolishness. But when you really want = to know, ask an old-timer who has sen it all...I haven't, but I am not afraid = to ask.     -- noel jones, aago    
(back) Subject: Re: Leather deterioration in NYC From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 18:27:45 -0400   On 8/30/03 4:57 PM, "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote:   > There are pipe organs from the same era (1920s) in NYC that operated on = their > original leather for 70 or more years before being releathered. GOOD = leather > lasts 50-70 years, even in this city. Leather costs less than junking an = organ > and buying a replacement that lasts half as long. I just saw an early > electropneumatic organ from the 1890s on its original leather, here in = the > city. Organs are destroyed and replaced because that's what people want, = not > because it was necessary.   Bravo! And Deo gratias.   Alan