PipeChat Digest #4139 - Thursday, December 4, 2003
 
Re: Sir Thomas Beecham
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Max Reger
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
digital ground zero pipe organ (fwd)
  by "Don Sizemore" <dls@metalab.unc.edu>
Re: Max Reger
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Max Reger
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: SJTD
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
bench height::tall/short players
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
Re: Can you identify this piece ?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: bench height::tall/short players
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Birmingham (Michigan) -First Church Music Workshop
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Sir Thomas Beecham From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 10:31:21 -0000   Dear John,   Not happy ...I should think so ! ...... but with whom ? How can one man 'destroy' a piano ..... and in one evening? 'Gott in Himmel', what was he playing it with ? How many Dan's had he got on his Karate blackbelt ? (and he really must = have giving it a good 'belt'). I can see why you didn't try and stop him ! Far too dangerous to come between such a man and the keyboard...   On the other hand, surely a piano from a maker with a good reputation = should have withstood such an assault; how else can instruments 'withstand' the constant practice that Liszt, Chopin, Berthoven-pieces, et al , require?   Or was he trying to play 'Chop-sticks'?   Harry 'musicman' Grove ________     >The apocryphal story .. [Edited]   "Interestingly enough his son, Adrian, came to my London home on one occasion and played my Chappell piano. He was so heavy handed that he = ruined the instrument. Obviously unintentionally, but I was not happy."   -----Original Message----- From: John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 03 December 2003 13:57 Subject: Re: Sir Thomas Beecham          
(back) Subject: Re: Max Reger From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 06:49:36 -0600   Most people are familiar with Max Reger's "Introduction and Passacaglia in D minor" (Op. 59), but not everyone is aware that Reger wrote several other Introductions and Passacaglias. A search of the internet revealed CD's of the D minor , E minor (Op. 63) and F minor (Op. 127) and his Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue on the Name of Bach. I have a friend who wants to find a recording of the F sharp minor "Introduction and Passacaglia". Does anyone know of one?   John Speller      
(back) Subject: digital ground zero pipe organ (fwd) From: "Don Sizemore" <dls@metalab.unc.edu> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 08:01:53 -0500 (EST)       PC-enabled tones rise from ruins of 9/11 By Ron Wilson, EE Times December 3, 2003 (4:30 p.m. EST) URL: http://www.eetimes.com/story/OEG20031203S0032     SAN MATEO, Calif. =E2=80=94 As the towers of the World Trade Center crumb= led on=20 that September day two years ago, the plume of debris they spewed claimed= =20 a victim that, although not human, was nonetheless irreplaceable to those= =20 who loved it: the mighty pipe organ in Trinity Episcopal Church at=20 Broadway and Wall Street. Dust and detritus from the collapse rendered th= e=20 church's 80-year-old Aeolian-Skinner organ unusable.   But that lesser tragedy opened the door to a unique story =E2=80=94 of mu= sical=20 skill, love of an instrument, insight into signal processing and=20 innovation in electronic systems design =E2=80=94 that this year has brou= ght=20 about a resurrection of sorts. Today a new mighty organ plays at Trinity=20 =E2=80=94 not a pipe organ, but perhaps the most innovative electronic=20 instrument ever to fill a sacred space.   For Douglas Marshall and David Ogletree, principals of the Marshall &=20 Ogletree LLC organ company in Needham Heights, Mass.), the loss at Trinit= y=20 Church would transform what had been a hobby, perhaps an obsession, into = a=20 product development. It would be a unique chance to prove that the=20 contrarian ideas they had formed over the course of a decade were correct= ,=20 and that conventional wisdom about sampled-data electronic instruments wa= s=20 at best incomplete.   Vanished gloryThe story began long before terrorists boarded airplanes=20 that late-summer morning in 2001. Marshall and Ogletree, who grew up 15=20 years apart in Westwood, Mass., and who both went on to careers as concer= t=20 organists, in the early 1990s formed a company to represent major organ=20 builders to the church market.   Along the way the two developed a love of the great Aeolian-Skinner pipe=20 organs that are arguably the finest organs ever built in North America.=20 With the Aeolian-Skinner Organ Co. gone, Marshall and Ogletree speculated= =20 about how the sounds =E2=80=94 and, more important, the playing experienc= e =E2=80=94=20 of such instruments could be preserved.   They hit upon a project to record samples of existing instruments around=20 the United States and experiment with them. =E2=80=9CWe had hoped that we= could=20 build some sort of addition to an electronic organ that would convey the=20 real sound of these instruments,=E2=80=9D Ogletree explained.   The theory of sampling musical instruments is relatively straightforward.= =20 Depending on its physics, an instrument has an attack, a steady-state and= =20 a release, each of which has a different tonal signature. This complexity= =20 can be reduced substantially by a few approximations =E2=80=94 for instan= ce,=20 using the steady-state tone and simply modifying it with attack and=20 release envelopes, perhaps throwing in some transients known to occur at=20 the opening and closing of the =E2=80=9Cvoice.=E2=80=9D   In this sort of approach, it's only necessary to get a good recording of = a=20 moment of the instrument's steady-state voice, and the rest is signal=20 processing.   But Marshall and Ogletree ran into a problem: That approach didn't end up= =20 sounding like the real thing. =E2=80=9CIn 1997 or so, we were doing exper= iments=20 with the digital sampling software that was just coming on the market,=E2= =80=9D=20 Ogletree said. =E2=80=9CThey were just starting to stream high-fidelity=20 recording onto hard disks, and we were playing with it. We began to=20 realize that the length of the recording made far more difference than we= =20 had believed.=E2=80=9D   It had been assumed, Ogletree explained, that the sonic content of an=20 organ voice matched what most people reported hearing. There is an=20 initial, transient period of a second or so, after which the human ear ca= n=20 identify a particular note and stop, and then the voice remains constant=20 until the release.   But the data Marshall and Ogletree were collecting contradicted that.=20 =E2=80=9CThe tone actually become steady a very long time after it seems = to have=20 settled,=E2=80=9D Ogletree said. =E2=80=9CRecorded samples of the attack = have to be as=20 long as 15 to 20 seconds to capture the actual voice, because there are=20 things going on during that entire period =E2=80=94 it's not at all a ste= ady=20 tone.=E2=80=9D   In fact, he said, the actual voice of a pipe organ stop is a tangled web=20 of transients, from the sound of the mechanical action to the pressurizin= g=20 and venting of air chambers to the voices of the pipe itself. Sorting out= =20 which transients contributed to a qualitative sense of realness=E2=80=94 = to a=20 master organist =E2=80=94 was a job that only an experienced player could= hope=20 to achieve. Late nights and many samples led to a collection of=20 proprietary techniques for combing the transients out of a recording and=20 ordering them for reproduction.   But there were more surprises in store. For one, there was the matter of=20 microphone placement. Organ pipes don't stand in the middle of a room and= =20 sing =E2=80=94 they stimulate a pipe cabinet that brings its own importan= t=20 contributions to the sound. This fact would demand exhaustive work on=20 microphone placement, multichannel recordings and even more nights over=20 the editing software teasing out just what mix of channels would represen= t=20 the truest voice of the pipe. Again, the ear of the organist and a=20 commitment to the task were essential.   Not least was the problem of authenticity. There is a characteristic soun= d=20 to the works of any great organ builder. But like any other kind of publi= c=20 art, a completed organ is subject to the attentions =E2=80=94 well meant = or=20 otherwise =E2=80=94 of many people, often with sad consequences. Cabinets= get=20 rebuilt or moved, pipes modified or damaged, pressure and flow=20 specifications changed. =E2=80=9CIt became a significant project just to=20 identify which pipes in which organs were in fact authentic,=E2=80=9D Ogl= etree=20 said.   Maybe an obsession The hobby began to take on the proportions of an=20 obsession. A big Skinner organ can have 80 or more stops, as the=20 individual voices are called. Each stop in turn can be applied to each ke= y=20 on the manual (the organ keyboard), resulting in a unique pipe or groupin= g=20 of pipes for each key/ stop combination. Using the painstaking long-sampl= e=20 recordings for each note for each stop generated nearly 20 Gbytes of=20 sampled data. =E2=80=9CThe cost of gathering all this data is almost=20 incalculable,=E2=80=9D Ogletree said. =E2=80=9CWithout a group of people = who were=20 dedicated to the point of being a little bit possessed, it could never=20 have been done.=E2=80=9D But gather they did.   The next problem in creating an instrument was to design an electronic=20 platform that could make use of the samples, and to develop=20 tone-generation and postprocessing applications that could turn the=20 samples back into voices, singing out in response to an organist's finger= s=20 and feet. Since =E2=80=9Cneither of us was a hardware person,=E2=80=9D Og= letree said,=20 the partners and their growing team of developers turned to off-the-shelf= =20 hardware rather than custom DSP design. Upon investigation, the group=20 concluded that a personal computer =E2=80=94 or perhaps a linked network = of PCs=20 =E2=80=94 with existing professional-grade sound cards could do the work.   So the team set out to develop tone-generation software running on a stoc= k=20 PC. Windows was quickly rejected as unreliable, and development was done=20 on the Linux operating system. Following the death of James Murray =E2=80= =94 the=20 key algorithm and software developer, himself an organist =E2=80=94 new s= oftware=20 designers joined the project, which by now was taking on a life of its ow= n=20 within the company. And then came the 9/11 attacks.   To build an organ The organ destroyed with the World Trade Center at=20 Trinity Church, situated just 600 feet from ground zero, was originally=20 built by Ernest Skinner in 1923 and substantially revised in 1958 and=20 again in 1968 by the Aeolian-Skinner company, making it a classic of its=20 breed. Marshall and Ogletree approached the organist and choirmaster of=20 Trinity, Owen Burdick, with a plan. What if they produced not a box to ad= d=20 to an organ, but an actual organ, built with the scope of the original=20 Aeolian-Skinner?   With Burdick's help, the project was approved, and after extensive site=20 surveys, an implementation plan emerged. The new organ would be an interi= m=20 installation, in place for about five years, until Trinity either rebuild= s=20 its original pipe organ =E2=80=94 now dismantled and sitting in storage =E2= =80=94 or=20 acquires a new one.   Like its predecessor, the electronic organ would sing out from two spots=20 in the church: the chancel and the gallery. To handle the massive amount=20 of polyphony necessary to blend the samples into a precise re-creation of= =20 a pipe organ, about 80 channels would be needed between the two locations= ,=20 each with its own digital output, amplifier and speaker. As in the=20 original installation, there would be two consoles, one at each site.   Marshall & Ogletree determined that 10 PCs would be necessary to drive al= l=20 the channels. The 74 speakers would be placed inside the existing organ=20 chambers, now hollowed out by removal of the destroyed Skinner pipes. The= =20 long cable that runs from the tone-generating PCs to the amplifier/speake= r=20 banks would necessitate balanced audio lines, which in turn would need=20 studio-quality sound card technology.   Definitive Technology (Owings Mills, Md.) was chosen for the speakers tha= t=20 would give voice to the organ manuals. Massive subwoofers would be used i= n=20 tandem with the Definitives =E2=80=94 the signal split by low-pass and hi= gh-pass=20 filters-for the deep notes played from the organ pedals. Each speaker=20 would be driven by its own Carver power amplifier =E2=80=94 a total of 15= ,000=20 watts.   =E2=80=9CIt was very important that the Definitive speakers were bipolar = =E2=80=94=20 they radiate both forward and to the rear,=E2=80=9D Ogletree said. =E2=80= =9CReal organ=20 pipes don't just radiate forward-they fill the cabinet in all directions,= =20 and turn the space around them into part of the instrument. To reproduce=20 that spatial depth at Trinity, the speakers would have to do the same.=E2= =80=9D   Consoles were ordered =E2=80=94 a relatively modest one for the gallery f= rom=20 Klann Organ Supply in Waynesboro, Va., and a much more ornate one for the= =20 chancel from Fratelli Ruffatti in Padua, Italy. It is scheduled for=20 installation by Christmas. Each console would house a custom control=20 system developed jointly with Classic Organ Works (Markham, Ontario).   Remarkably, after an official project start in December 2002, the organ=20 was ready to play at a commemorative service on Sept. 11 of this year. Th= e=20 new instrument even had a name: Epiphany.   With the masses of hardware and cabling installed, the tone-generation,=20 postprocessing and control software debugged and the instrument tuned to=20 the space, Ogletree is pleased with the results. =E2=80=9COf course I hav= e a=20 biased opinion,=E2=80=9D he said. =E2=80=9CBut I would say that it's one = of the two or=20 three best instruments on which I've played. The experience is what a=20 great organ should be: It is humbling, in a way staggering, to sit at the= =20 console and hear.=E2=80=9D   And what is next for the company? Interest is stirring among churches and= =20 concert halls, Ogletree said, as word of the Epiphany spreads through the= =20 small but close-knit community of concert organists. The company believes= =20 there will almost certainly be more Epiphany installations. And the=20 development will go on. The present samples were collected with what was=20 then state-of-the-art equipment.   But today, said Ogletree, =E2=80=9Cthe digital technology has advanced to= the=20 point that it is not a limiting factor. The limits are microphone and=20 speaker technology, and those are really lagging behind.=E2=80=9D New mic= rophone=20 technology might very well trigger a new round of sample collection, he=20 said.    
(back) Subject: Re: Max Reger From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 08:27:33 -0600   I can't find a Reger Intro and Passacaglia in f# in either Henderson's Directory or Beckmann's Repertorium--though I might have overlooked it. Anyone else have any luck? There is an Introduction and Passacaglia in F# = by Franz Schmidt, which is the closest I can get to the key. Reger's Op. 73 = is in f#, but that's a different kettle of fish. Bob Lind ----- Original Message -----   > Most people are familiar with Max Reger's "Introduction and Passacaglia > in D minor" (Op. 59), but not everyone is aware that Reger wrote several > other Introductions and Passacaglias. A search of the internet revealed > CD's of the D minor , E minor (Op. 63) and F minor (Op. 127) and his > Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue on the Name of Bach. I have a > friend who wants to find a recording of the F sharp minor "Introduction > and Passacaglia". Does anyone know of one? > > John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Max Reger From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 06:43:29 -0800   I likewise came up empty, both in my own catalog and from the notes to Rosalinde Haas's claimed complete CD set. BTW, op. 63 is the f minor and = op. 127 the e minor.   MAF   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>   > I can't find a Reger Intro and Passacaglia in f# in either Henderson's > Directory or Beckmann's Repertorium--though I might have overlooked it. > Anyone else have any luck? There is an Introduction and Passacaglia in = F# by > Franz Schmidt, which is the closest I can get to the key. Reger's Op. 73 is > in f#, but that's a different kettle of fish. > Bob Lind > ----- Original Message ----- > > > Most people are familiar with Max Reger's "Introduction and = Passacaglia > > in D minor" (Op. 59), but not everyone is aware that Reger wrote = several > > other Introductions and Passacaglias. A search of the internet = revealed > > CD's of the D minor , E minor (Op. 63) and F minor (Op. 127) and his > > Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue on the Name of Bach. I have a > > friend who wants to find a recording of the F sharp minor = "Introduction > > and Passacaglia". Does anyone know of one? > > > > John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: SJTD From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 11:40:53 -0500   Surely. I have a round concrete cistern near my home, in which even my singing sounds good! I'm thinking of having a Lowery installed. ;-)   Nevertheless, I heard a dueling organ concert last night in Wheeling in which an Allen soundly thrashed the behind of a thrice-rebuilt 1952 58-rank Cassavant in good repair. Fine perfomers and same acoustics for both instruments.   Cheers and good will to all. -WG     > "Stanley Lowkis" <Lowkis@theatreorgans.com> > > OR.. > > Some of us could send it to the Cathedral, praising the > acoustics: "Even a vacuum cleaner would sound good in there"! > > Stan :)    
(back) Subject: bench height::tall/short players From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 11:07:37 -0600   I'm 5'3" and for many years have set the bench as low as it can go. I = have trouble playing in situations where there is only one height adjustment, i.e. too high. The instrument I play has a 1950's Moller console. Is it = my imagination or are the dimensions of Moller boards different from AGO standard? Seems the Moller pedals are somehow bigger.   Exciting project on the way at St.Paul's, DeKalb, IL. The 37-rank Howell = is to be rebuilt beginning after New Year's. We're supposed to be done by mid-March. A great instrument getting better and all are invited to come have a look-see.   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ Don=92t worry if your Inbox will max out while you are enjoying the = holidays. Get MSN Extra Storage! http://join.msn.com/?PAGE=3Dfeatures/es    
(back) Subject: Re: Can you identify this piece ? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 09:31:58 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Now this IS interesting, though I have to say that it is a bit like "Sorry, I haven't a clue!"   The style is very English, and of a particular period. I would suggest between about 1930 and 1940. It may, at a stretch, be American.   That's a great start, as you can see.   What other clues are there?   Well, I have well honed sensibilities, and the things I hear are Gershwin mixed with a remarkable gift for advanced harmony.   Also, this is not an easy work; therefore suggesting a "big" name in either the theatre organ world or the classical organ world.   Some of the flourishes I have heard before.....   I thought of Percy Whitlock, but decided that if it were he, we would probably know the piece. Then I thought of Percy Fletcher; a prolific composer of light music, but only rarely venturing into organ music. Then I thought of Reginald Porter-Brown, who had a brilliant technique.....who knows, it may just be.   Too late in style for Alfred Hollins, but on the right track.   But where had I heard music like this before?   Too "deep" for Sid Torch, but not impossible.   Maybe Norman Cocker, but if it is, I certainly don't know it.   So I thought some more....who had style, virtuosity, extraordinary harmonic ability and composing skills?   There is really only ONE performer/composer who fits the bill, and it just HAS to be Quentin Maclean......that's my guess.   There is more than a passing resemblance to his style and technique, but if so, what is the piece?   Well....although it doesn't sound like it fits into something bigger, and also because I have never heard it performed or seen the manuscript, I hesitate.   However, I "just wonder" if it isn't a movement from his unpublished organ concerto?   It was highly regarded by George Thalben-Ball, and I "just wonder" if he isn't performing it?   I "think" I may know someone who may know however. Why not contact the Cinema Organ Society, and ask if Bill Davies is contactable? He is a virtuoso pianist/organist and a composer of some merit....especially of film scores. It is not beyond the realms of possibility that HE wrote it, but somehow, I doubt that it is his style.   =A35 each way anyone?   Anyway, just a few rambling thoughts on the matter...but I would go for Quentin Maclean who was, after all, the theatre organist who studied composition with Max Reger. (Do I hear just a hint of Reger in that music?)   You didn't tell us where it was recorded.       Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Bruce Miles <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> wrote: > Hello All, > > This my 5 th (about) annual request. > > Can anyone please identify this piece ?? I've trying > for years to find it -     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now http://companion.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: bench height::tall/short players From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 15:41:52 -0600   HI Jim, Just curious. Who is doing the re-build? Thanks, Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2003 11:07 AM Subject: bench height::tall/short players     > I'm 5'3" and for many years have set the bench as low as it can go. I have > trouble playing in situations where there is only one height adjustment, > i.e. too high. The instrument I play has a 1950's Moller console. Is = it my > imagination or are the dimensions of Moller boards different from AGO > standard? Seems the Moller pedals are somehow bigger. > > Exciting project on the way at St.Paul's, DeKalb, IL. The 37-rank = Howell is > to be rebuilt beginning after New Year's. We're supposed to be done by > mid-March. A great instrument getting better and all are invited to = come > have a look-see. > > jim > > O):^) > > _________________________________________________________________ > Don't worry if your Inbox will max out while you are enjoying the holidays. > Get MSN Extra Storage! http://join.msn.com/?PAGE=3Dfeatures/es > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Birmingham (Michigan) -First Church Music Workshop From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 19:28:32 -0600   =46olks   I received the following from Tom Trenney and am=20 passing it along to all of you with his=20 permission. There might be some of you that are=20 interested in attending.   David   ****************************************************************************= ************ Many Voices...One Song   Church Music Workshop Scheduled for Saturday,=20 =46ebruary 7 at Birmingham's First Presbyterian=20 Church!   Please plan to join us for an unusual opportunity=20 to learn more about all aspects of music=20 ministry-- organ playing, conducting, bell=20 ringing, repertoire, singing, service planning,=20 children's choir. Learn from worldclass teachers=20 from around the country gathered here in your own=20 backyard! The clinicians for this year's=20 workshop include:   Peter Richard Conte, Grand Court Organist of the=20 Wanamaker Organ at Lord and Taylor, Philadelphia;=20 Director of the critically-acclaimed St.=20 Clement's Choir which has recorded on the=20 Dorian label   David Davidson, Director of Dallas Symphony=20 Chorus; Director of Music at Highland Park United=20 Methodist Church in Dallas; highly sought-after=20 handbell clinician Granville Oldham, Director of=20 the University of Southern California's=20 University Chorus; formerly on the Choral=20 Conducting Faculty at University of Alabama; has=20 conducted the Los Angeles Children's Choir Robert=20 McIver, Head of the Voice Department at the=20 Eastman School of Music; Composer for Choristers=20 Guild and Hinshaw Music Karen McIver,=20 International representative and clinician for=20 Musikgarten International; Director of the=20 Bethany Academy of Music in Rochester, New York=20 Thomas Troeger, Vice President and Dean of=20 Academic Affairs and Professor of Preaching and=20 Communication at Iliff School of Theology,=20 Denver; Teacher, Hymnwriter, Author, Musician,=20 Preacher   Here is the exciting schedule of events for the=20 workshop featuring something tailored for=20 everyone's needs!     Saturday, February 7, 2004       9:00 a.m. Breakfast on the Fly (Knox Auditorium)   9:30 a.m. Workshop A: Please select one of the following options:   =B7 A Crash Course on Hymn Playing with Peter Conte (Sanctuary)   =B7 Brahms' Requiem: FPC's Chancel Choir coaches with David Davidson   (Choir Room)   =B7 Artistic Armwaving: a conducting lesson with Granville Oldham   (Children's Choir Room)   =B7 Imagination in Worship with Thomas Troeger (Calvin Hall)   =B7 Back to the Basics of Bells with Donna Calhoun (Youth Room)   10:30 a.m. Workshop B: Please select one of the following options:   =B7 Making Stuff Up: organ improvisation with Peter Conte (Sanctuary)   =B7 Next Stop=8AThe Met: a vocal masterclass with Robert McIver (Chap= el)   =B7 Musical Play: FPC's Chapel Choir works with Karen McIver   (Joyful Noise)   =B7 I Heard the Bells' Mistakes Sunday:=20 rehearsal techniques for improving ringing and=20 musicianship with David Davidson (Youth Room)   =B7 Got Music?: FPC's Carol Choir works with Granville Oldham   (Children's Choir Room)   =B7 Sonic Culture of Worship with Thomas Troeger (Calvin Hall)   =B7 Hit Parade: a choral reading session with Tom Trenney (Choir Room= )   11:30 a.m. Master Rehearsals: Please select one of the following options:   =B7 Detroit's Classical Bells rehearse with David Davidson (Youth Roo= m)   =B7 The Birmingham-First Chamber Choir rehearses with Peter Conte   (Sanctuary)   =B7 FPC's Children's Choirs rehearse with Granville Oldham   (Children's Choir Room)   12:45 p.m. Lunch (Knox Auditorium)   1:30 p.m. Workshop C: Please select one of the following options:   =B7 Two Hands, Two Feet, Too Many Notes! :=20 adapting anthem accompaniments to the organ with=20 Peter Conte (Sanctuary)   =B7 Call Me Maestro: conducting tips from David Davidson (Choir Room)   =B7 Got Music?: FPC's Chapel Choir works with Granville Oldham   (Children's Choir Room)   =B7 Musical Play: FPC's Carol Choir works with Karen McIver   (Joyful Noise)   =B7 Next Stop=8AThe Met: A vocal masterclass with Robert McIver (Chap= el)   =B7 Imagination in Worship with Thomas Troeger (Calvin Hall)   =B7 Ringing Outside the Lines: exploring=20 some of the creative uses for bells in the=20 worship service with Donna Calhoun (Youth Room)   2:30 p.m. Workshop D: Please select one of the following options.   =B7 Singing with Spirit: a guide to help encourage expressive singing= from   the podium with Granville Oldham (Children's Choir Room)   =B7 Piping for Peter: organ masterclass with Peter Conte (Sanctuary)   =B7 Back to Bach: the Birmingham-First=20 Chamber Choir rehearses St. John Passion with=20 David Davidson (Choir Room)   =B7 Top Ten Tips To Tip-Top Vocal Health with Robert McIver (Chapel)   =B7 I've Got Rhythm: musical movement with Karen McIver (Joyful Noise= )   =B7 Sonic Culture of Worship with Thomas Troeger (Calvin Hall)   3:30 p.m. Afternoon Options:   =B7 Combined Choirs with Granville Oldham (Sanctuary)   =B7 FPC Ringers with David Davidson (Youth Room)   =B7 The Wanamaker Organ with Peter Richard Conte (Fireside Room)   =B7 CrossWalks: The Workshop Rotation Model=20 of Christian Education with Cindy Merten (Calvin=20 Hall)         Registration fee for the day's events is only $20=20 ($10 for AGO members). This small fee includes=20 breakfast and lunch as shown in the schedule=20 above. Please contact Tom Trenney at=20 <mailto:ttrenney@comcast.net>ttrenney@comcast.net=20 or 248.644.2040, x. 136 with any questions.=20 Registration checks can be sent to:   Tom Trenney =46irst Presbyterian Church 1669 West Maple Road Birmingham, MI 48009   Openings are filling up fast, so please register=20 as soon as possible! Bring your friends and=20 colleagues! Registration Deadline is January 30! -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org