PipeChat Digest #4153 - Saturday, December 13, 2003
 
Re: Anglo American organ positions
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
RE: Demise of Choirs
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Anglo American organ positions
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
RE: Practicing on princess pedalboard
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Tony O'Brien Plays Holiday Concert on Rochester Wurlitzer. (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
RE: Madeleine
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Madeleine
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: Madeleine
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
Boston Symphony Hall
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Boston Symphony Hall
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
Re: The Moller vs. The Princess
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
Ending the Saint Thomas speculation
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Boston Symphony Hall
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Boston Symphony Hall
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Boston Symphony Hall
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Ending the Saint Thomas speculation
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Re: Ending the Saint Thomas speculation
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: Demise of Choirs
  by <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com>
Re: The Moller vs. The Princess
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Anglo American organ positions From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 05:47:44 EST   Of course strings are pulled to get these people in this country. Speak to organ firms that have tried to get trained people in to assist in =   their business and they will tell you it is a series of closed doors. = Getting a European organ tech or builder in on that special work permit may take = years to execute if it happens at all. I am sure much has to do with the = hysteria of the terrorist situation now. Steve  
(back) Subject: RE: Demise of Choirs From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 21:04:47 +0800   This is pretty much the picture in my part of the world also. The Cathedrals and some churches have choirs, many fostered by the Royal School of Church Music, but they are mainly in the Anglican Churches. From 1954 to 1971 I was organist and choir director at a metropolitan church. There were two adult choirs. One sang at the morning service and the other at night. Both were excellent choirs. By 1971 choirs were beginning to become scarce in all the churches and we had left one aging choir which sang in the morning service. No night service any longer.   IN 1971 I moved to my present rural city (popn 30 000). I took over a children's choir of about 15 children which, under my direction soon grew to 48 kids singing three part harmony. A number of these were from my school choirs who had followed me into the church choir (call me the Pied PIper if you like!). There was also an adult choir which sang at the evening service. That was 1971. After 32 years I am still choir director but the choir consists of adults only,some aging but who do a very good job of supporting the hymn singing and who sing anthems and psalms uin the morning service. IN this city which has around 30 denominations there are only two choirs as such, ours and the other at the Anglican Church. Some churches have "Singing Groups" who subsist on a diet of choruses and "songs of praise". There are several congregations of pentecostal and "family churches". Some of these have youth choirs who deafen the congregation with over amplified "music" with a youthful female vocalist who screeches her way through a pop style song of praise.. Loud seems to equate with good.   Choral singing in the schools has lost the quality that used to be there, Music sung by most of these is "pop" and pitched very low so that the children grind the songs out in a pseudo bass. Pardon me while I shudder.   Keith, I tell you, times have changed and any move back to good choral singing has to come through our schools as well as the churches. At present in this state I don't know of more than half a dozen schools who have a quality choral music programme. The rest which sport choirs teach them to sing rubbish.   Perhaps I should say that few of our churches in this state would have paid musicians; some would be paid an allowance of sorts but, with the exception of one or two of the Cathedrals, I doubt whether there would be any full time musical directors at all. Bob Elms.     ---- Original Message ---- From: kwzimmerman@alltel.net To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: RE: Demise of Choirs Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 19:29:14 -0500   >Posters, > >My conclusions about the paucity of choirs comes solely from my >observations as a lay person. Nevertheless, I think I do have some valid points.      
(back) Subject: Re: Anglo American organ positions From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 05:25:43 -0800 (PST)   Probably more than the terrorist situation is the limited number of H1B visas that can be granted per year and the demand on same by the various tech industries. This demand, along with tech constracting firms being expert at "working the system" because of high run-rate experience, probably squeezes out the single individual requests for skilled artisans.   -Bill   --- Seedlac@aol.com wrote: > Of course strings are pulled to get these people in this > country. > Speak to organ firms that have tried to get trained people in > to assist in > their business and they will tell you it is a series of > closed doors. Getting a > European organ tech or builder in on that special work permit > may take years > to execute if it happens at all. I am sure much has to do > with the hysteria of > the terrorist situation now. > Steve > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D    
(back) Subject: RE: Practicing on princess pedalboard From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 07:39:52 -0600   Seb, I would imagine the princess pedalboard is more concerned with your weight than hers. Just a surmise. But there must be some blonde in the pedals' color scheme, and for heaven's sake don't forget her tiara on a date.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who needs to highlight the gray this weekend)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: Thursday, December 11, 2003 9:35 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Practicing on princess pedalboard   Dear Malcolm:   A princess pedalboard is a pedalboard that expects you to purchase her a   piece of jewelry every time you accidentally guess her weight to be twenty more pounds than it actually is.        
(back) Subject: Tony O'Brien Plays Holiday Concert on Rochester Wurlitzer. (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 15:56:37 -0500   The Rochester Theater Organ Society is proud to feature Tony O'Brien = playing a holiday concert on our Wurlitzer 4/23. Tony entertains us on Sunday afternoon, December 21 starting at 2:30 PM. This event is at the = extensively remodeled NEW Auditorium Theatre, 875 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Tickets will go on sale at the box office at 1:30 priced at only = $15 each. Please visit http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ for driving = directions and much more info.   Following the concert, we will celebrate the 75th birthday of Wurlitzer = opus 1951 with an on-stage party including cake and punch at no charge to the audience.   At this concert, a brand new CD version ($10 at the concert) of a 1963 stereo LP release "Tom Grierson Plays Palace Favorites," which was = recorded on our opus 1951 at its original home in Rochester's RKO Palace before the Palace fell victim to urban renewal 2 years later. Tom Grierson was the Palace's long-time chief organist who opened the Wurlitzer at the = theater's grand opening on Dec. 24, 1928.   Please join us for this grand afternoon of entertainment and birthday celebration.   Submitted by Ken Evans, RTOS Director    
(back) Subject: RE: Madeleine From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 16:58:56 -0500   As I mentioned yesterday, the vision and perseverence of a "staunch = priest with intelligence and taste" was highly instrumental in bringing = the choir school at the Madeleine about.   I wasn't sure of his full name at the time, but it's Msgr. M. Francis = Mannion, Rector of the Cathedral at least as of 2000. I also came upon = a beautiful and inspiring article that he wrote for the journal _First = Things_ on the subject of the city and its sanctification by the church. = This subject might sound quite irrelevant to what we do, but not to = him.   The article is at: = http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0002/articles/mannion.html   Here is an excerpt of his penetrating thought:   What is human work but a participation in divine creation? What is = leisure but an anticipation of the unlabored life of heaven? What does = the artist do but restore creation to its divine origin and end? Beauty in all its material and = practical expressions exists to draw humanity into the redeeming beauty of God. This is surely = what Dostoevsky had in mind when one of his characters in The Idiot declares that = "beauty will save the world."   This doxological and aesthetic vision provides the = protocol for the Church's ministry of and to the arts. Churches do not hold organ recitals, arts = festivals, and concerts simply because these are nice, inspiring pursuits. Commitment to the = beautiful is intrinsic to the Church's life for the reason that the Church's vision is the eternally = beautiful city. This commitment, it may be argued, is especially incumbent upon large and = well-endowed urban churches.=20   The Church today can play a role in bringing the arts back = from alienation from the transcendent-an alienation that has led the arts = themselves into severe disorientation and crisis. Church art programs can elevate and ennoble what = beauty exists in the human city and among its artists and poets.=20    
(back) Subject: RE: Madeleine From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 16:15:39 -0600   Similar thoughts have been expressed by the pastor of St. James Cathedral, Seattle. Its inspired music program speaks eloquently to these timeless values.   Peter   Paul quoted thus:   The Church today can play a role in bringing the arts back from alienation from the transcendent-an alienation that has led the arts themselves into severe disorientation and crisis. Church art programs can elevate and ennoble what beauty exists in the human city and among its artists and poets.=20    
(back) Subject: RE: Madeleine From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 14:38:15 -0800 (PST)   Thanks!, Paul, for sending on this excerpt.   I can only hope to add to the words of Fr. Mannion my personal belief that the expression of (sacred) music in a church, even at recital only, is in fact an act of worship in-and-of itself.   -Bill   --- "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote: > to the arts. Churches do not hold organ > recitals, arts festivals, and concerts simply because > these are nice, inspiring pursuits. Commitment > to the beautiful is intrinsic to the Church's life > for the reason that the Church's vision is the > eternally beautiful city. This commitment, it > may be argued, is especially incumbent upon > large and well-endowed urban churches. > > The Church today can play a role in bringing > the arts back from alienation from the > transcendent-an alienation that has led the > arts themselves into severe disorientation and > crisis. Church art programs can elevate and > ennoble what beauty exists in the human city > and among its artists and poets. >    
(back) Subject: Boston Symphony Hall From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 19:35:53 -0600   Just sitting here watching "Holiday at Pops", I was wondering how often the organ was being used nowadays?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 21:07:23 EST   Glenda:   According to my sources the organ is being overhauled. When I lived there =   1967-78 the AS was played a total of four times and only when maestro = Arthur Fiedler was conducting.   Three times with Berj and once with Virgil.   Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: Re: The Moller vs. The Princess From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 21:21:37 EST   Well, no I'm not sure, but the Moller was built in 1948 and it appears to = me to be AGO. How can I tell?   Tom    
(back) Subject: Ending the Saint Thomas speculation From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 22:08:50 EST   FIRST of all, here is the "long" list of applicants: Eliviretta Mugnoz-Daggy Djarmousche Heck Chitnis Chinitinindis Bob Smith Vandirabolintis Hrzydzymniewski John Scott Thuc Minh Tran McBerkowitz SECONDLY, there is no "good ole boy network." All important church music positions, worldwide, are decided upon by a =   council of twelve elderly Jewish eastern European women, usually as "small = talk" while making strudel dough. Applicants are auditioned, and invited to = Shabbat dinner, and the SURE way to get eliminated from consideration is to tell them, "I'm full. I cannot eat another bite." THIRDLY, Mr. Scott left Saint Paul's in London because with the elimination of Concorde aviation service, he simply found it impractical = to hold both positions. While I expect to be flamed for revealing what up until now was highly =   classified information, I hope this post will put an end to the = speculation.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City Provost, The College of Knowledge   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 21:27:10 -0600   Tell me if I am wrong but I think OSI was making a 32' sub-bourdon for Symphony Hall last summer? I stopped by there on the way to Buffalo,NY to have some pipework for my house organ worked on and saw this immense = pedal stop! I believe some of it was using the Haskell method because of space situations. Thanks, Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, December 12, 2003 7:35 PM Subject: Boston Symphony Hall     > Just sitting here watching "Holiday at Pops", I was wondering how often > the organ was being used nowadays? > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 21:34:43 -0600   >Just sitting here watching "Holiday at Pops", I was wondering how often >the organ was being used nowadays?   Glenda   The organ is being rebuilt y Foley-Baker - see: http://www.bso.org/itemB/detail.jhtml;jsessionid=3DQK4YCIPMO1ULTLA2DJDSFEQ?= id=3D12300010&area=3Dcon   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 22:37:06 EST   If you saw Haskelled pipes, it was not a 32' Bourdon, since such ranks are =   stoppered. You most likely saw a 32' Double Diapason.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Ending the Saint Thomas speculation From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 22:45:35 EST   Gang,   I am highly reluctant to do this, but since so many keep = inquiring... "I" was the other candidate. It came down to John Scott of St. Paul's London... or myself, Peter Isherwood of Nativity Roman Catholic Church in = Fair Haven, NJ. Although I was offered the position, I had to my fondness for playing "Gift of Finest Wheat" and "On Eagle's Wings", two such pieces that St. = Thomas does not have in their repertoire. So to put an end to the speculation, I = reside in Fair Haven, and I wish Mr. Scott all the best at his new endeavor!   Yours faithfully,   Mr. Peter Isherwood Minister of Music Nativity Church, Fair Haven, NJ  
(back) Subject: Re: Ending the Saint Thomas speculation From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 22:58:58 -0500     Sometimes finding out who turned down a position is more interesting that who took it...among all the speculation no one has brought up that possibly one or more of the others considered may have withdrawn...   It has always seemed rather unfair that we of the US cannot take a position in Canada without the government receiving proof that a Canadian cannot be found to take the job....or that we, if we say we are going to England to look for a job, are turned away at the border.   noel jones    
(back) Subject: Re: Demise of Choirs From: <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 00:04:42 -0500   >From: <Oboe32@aol.com> >Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 23:18:40 EST   <Organists compromise having a real instrument so that they can have digital 32's and Tubas and a Bombarde division in >a church that seats 150!? Honestly, we're all guilty of it.>   No! We are not ALL guilty of it. Many of us stand our ground in spite of the consequences. Scritchies and Haruffaroo-bahawow...   Bruce and the Baskerbeagles http://baskerbeagles.com a great way to shop http://www.smartmall.biz?717886 HELP FEED ANIMALS FOR FREE http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and = http://pets.care2.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The Moller vs. The Princess From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 00:15:53 EST   go to the AGO web site and look up the specs for pedal boards.   I understand all the major electronics match the specs.   a princess board would NOT meet the specs but did fill a lot of churches = with "real" sound replacing the whirling wheels of Laurens.   dale in Florida