PipeChat Digest #4162 - Friday, December 19, 2003
 
Re: Princess pedalboard practice (was Advice on Allen)
  by "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com>
Re: Anglican Chant
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Holidays in Caracas 03
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: AGO Bench Height
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Saint Niccola, was RE: Holidays in Caracas 02
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Is Anglican chant becoming a dead art?
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Schuke vs Shulke vs Schuelke
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: AGO Bench Height
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Edward Hodges at Trinity New York
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Saint Niccola, was RE: Holidays in Caracas 02
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Princess pedalboard practice (was Advice on Allen)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Schuke vs Shulke vs Schuelke und Bier
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: AGO Bench Height
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
Re: Saint Niccola, was RE: Holidays in Caracas 02
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Is Anglican chant becoming a dead art?
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Otto Winter
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Edward Hodges at Trinity New York
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: AGO Bench Height
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Reminder-Tony O'Brien in Rochester Sunday afternoon (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Princess pedalboard practice (was Advice on Allen) From: "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 06:26:06 -0800 (PST)       Can anybody out there tell me from experience how it goes switching from a = "princess" pedalboard for practicing purposes to an AGO-standard for = performing...am I shooting myself in the feet by practicing on a smaller = pedalboard?   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------= ---------------------------- "If memory serves, the Rondo had a 25-note pedalboard whereas the T-12 series had the 32-note "princess" pedalboard (i.e., the pedals are narrower and shorter than AGO). There may have been other differences between the two. T-12A and T-12B were effectively the same organ with speakers being the only significant distinction -- "A" had console speakers and "B" had external "gyro" cabinet only"               --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing  
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican Chant From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 03:34:33 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I'm rather good at Anglican Chant (preening whiskers and licking fur here!)   SPEECH RHYTHM is the key to good psalm singing   Every sentence has a natural rhythm, which you ignore at your peril.   NO GATHERING NOTES....EVER.   Good pointing (and there IS bad pointing!) should emphasise the natural stresses of speech rhythm; the bar lines (pointing) are there for that reason.   Just tell your choir to "LEAN OVER THE BAR"   Most of the problems in psalm singing occur, when people lose sight of the words and try to make them regular.....as in a hymn for example. Speech rhythm is NEVER regular, but we all know how to speak naturally and make ourselves understood perfectly.   So Bud is quite right. Start with SAYING the words naturally, and then perhaps monotone before adding the music of the chant.       IT REALLY IS EASY. The trouble is, people try to make it difficult.   Regards   Colin Mitchell UK     --- quilisma@cox.net wrote:   If I'm teaching the psalter > THAT way, I > generally begin with reciting the words without > note, but with the > slight stresses; then I have the choir chant the > words in unison on a > monotone; THEN I have then sing the Anglican chant > until they have it > memorized, WITHOUT words, and finally we put the > whole thing together.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Holidays in Caracas 03 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 08:48:00 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Part 03: Santa plays the Accordion, and an Organ Tech gets an Emergency = Job   Finally Mr S. came in, handed us over the scores of "Merry, Merry Santa Claus" and Mrs E. helped him to put on the bishop costume and the huge beard. "OK, folks", he finally adressed us, "You must know exactly what to do when we are finished on stage and hundreds of kids start swarming all over the place demanding their gifts". "Yes, Sir: to shake in our boots, Sir", one of my fellow Santas kidded. "No Sir, you go with Andres to the keg aside the Coca-Cola stand ", Mr S replied. "And, since Mrs E. cannot sing, Andres will be the group leader = and I will accompany him with the accordion". So said, so done: Mr S. hanged = the accordion over his shoulder with verve, and promptly ripped off his beard with the instrument. Our roaring laughter was cut in half by Mrs E.'s comment: "If this happens on stage in front of the kids we are done! What = do you need the accordion for?- Andres has voice and vim enough for all of = us!" But Mr S. insisted on the accordion, and a reluctant Mrs E. put on the = beard again and secured it with glue. After a short rehearsal of "Merry, Merry Santa Claus" we went downstairs, leaded by Saint Niccola di Bari with an accordion instead of a croisier.   "Merry, Merry Santa Claus" has seven stanzas. The first two are about snow and icicles at winter night... Central Europe Time maybe, but we were standing in the afternoon sun giving away our lives for an ice cold Coke. Following Mrs E.'s instruction my hood was so deep over my face that I barely had an outlook at the score and the microphone- but to none of my fellows. After the fourth stanza Saint Niccola pleaded aloud: "For = heaven's sake, Andres, stop for a moment and help me! This darned beard is hopeless entangled in my accordion!" - and in front of a hundred+ kids I had to = pull Santa's beard out of Santa's accordion's keyboard meanwhile Mrs E. groaned aloud and one of the helpers kidded: "fine to have the Tech at hand in = such a situation, huh?" The procedure seemed me to last a century; in fact it took less than a minute. Soaked in sweat and caring a darn if my unhistorically bifocals were visible or not anymore I finished "Merry, = Merry Santa Claus". The accordion sounded somewhat shaky too...   After that I started with my fellow Santa helper towards the Coke stand = with the keg aside. Alas, we all had forgot that there were *two* Coke stands = at the fair, and of course I first arrived with the kids at the wrong one... there was no keg there. Feeling like Moses (Mrs E. rather suggested the Mouse Hunter of Hamelin afterwards) I guided the kids to the right stand with the keg, which already was surrounded by another bunch of kids. = Swiftly we started to give out the gifts. "Pray that there are enough gifts in there", my fellow Santa muttered. = "Last year there weren't and I almost was lynched". Well, fortunatedly there = were enough gifts this time; and after the last gift was given away to a kid = who wailed aloud (there always are some kids who fear Santa), I said to my fellow: "C'mon, let's go. My wife must be desperate, and I'm starving for = a beer". The kid stopped crying at once and wondered aloud: "Hey mom, did = you hear this?- SANTA HAS A WIFE!! AND SHE'S HERE AT THE FAIR!!"   Will be ctd... =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.        
(back) Subject: RE: AGO Bench Height From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:32:41 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   As for AGO measures, I feel perfectly happy with them and wouldn't miss them- beeing an "All American Six Foot Boy" :) But a colleague of mine who has short legs faces trouble and was happy when the new [digital] for the Youth Orchestras Foundation came with an adjustable bench!   Heigth adjustable organ benches should be standard for concert organs and churches with active musical life where the organ is shared by several organists. It's a matter of cost, as always: These benches aren't just a bargain. Bricks and wood shims are less expensive <SG>   Just my 56 bolivars [two cents] Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Saint Niccola, was RE: Holidays in Caracas 02 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:40:43 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Nicola di Bari was born in Lycia, Asia Minor; became Bishop of Myra in = Asia Minor and died there in 344 average. In the 11th cty, italian merchants took away his remains to Bari in Italy to salvage them from profanation by the Sarracens. Since then he is reverred in Bari and became -among other things- patron of seamen in extreme danger.   His reputation as "Santa Claus" is due to the fact that he was a very charitable man and liked to gift poor people in anonymous manner. It's = said that once he gifted three golden balls to three young ladies who were too poor to get properly married. He threw the golden balls through the (open, = I hope <G>!) window of their house. How the folks therein found out that the anonymous gifter was their bishop isn't revealed by the legend :) The evolution of this saint from his original status to actual Santa Claus is a very long but interesting history.   As usual many thanks for all these kind acknowledgements, specially by Malcolm. A last minute corrigenda became necessary. The title of the song (original in german) was free translated. "Merry Merry Santa Claus" sounds = a lot better.   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: Re: Is Anglican chant becoming a dead art? From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:02:56 +0800   Two churches in this small rural city do use Anglican Chant but not as a weekly affair. One is an Anglican Church and the other is Uniting (ex- Methodist). I don't think using Anglican Chant is all that rare in Australia. My choir also sings Gelineau at times. Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Is Anglican chant becoming a dead art? Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 13:03:12 -0600   >Hi! > Is there a reason why you can't chant the Psalm of the Day in its >correct place in the Liturgy? I've always thought it was supposed to >be >between the Old Testament and Gospel readings. This is how it has >been in >every Anglican church I've ever been to. St. Luke's in Evanston,IL >uses >Anglican Chant for the Psalm almost every week at two of their three >services of Holy Eucharist. > >Does anyone have any suggestions for teaching a Non-Anglican choir >to >sing Anglican Chant? I love to use various settings of the Psalms in >the >tradition in which I work, but my choir has yet to be able to do >Anglican >Chant. > >I suppose this should probably be responded to privately. > > >Blessings, >Beau Surratt >Minister of Worship and Music >United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Schuke vs Shulke vs Schuelke From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:25:24 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Als always, "Papa Google" gives a lot of hits. To avoid an endless wading = to busy people, the two german schuke firms are:   Alexander Schuke, Potsdam: www.schuke.de/   Karl Schuke, Berlin: www.schuke-berlin.de/   (You may have to add the http first)   Both websites available in english. They have nothing to do with the american firms Schulke or Schuelke. Anyway this accidental misspelling = gave me a lot of information about organ history! A little away of topic but = not so far away, many german firms and foundations which were located in the eastern side of Germany divided and opened filial houses in "the West" = when it became clear that Eastern Germany would remain under communist regime = for a long time.   As for the brewery sponsoring organs <BIG sigh> I wish that our Polar brewery here (the largest is south America as far as I am informed) would show some interest in that....... :)   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Re: AGO Bench Height From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:56:15 -0500   On 12/18/03 8:32 AM, "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> wrote:   > Heigth adjustable organ benches should be standard for concert organs and > churches with active musical life where the organ is shared by several > organists. It's a matter of cost, as always: These benches aren't just a > bargain.=20   Certainly true; even self-evident. The lowest-paid secretary in a small office has a (cheap) ergonomically designed swivel chair that is adjustable in at least three ways, including tension on the backrest. (Even the arm-rests, if they're there, are adjustable.) An ordinary parish secretary has that. How much more should the organist have such. Likewise, when you go to a piano recital, the pianist usually has a (upholstered in black leather!) adjustable bench.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Edward Hodges at Trinity New York From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:00:14 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 9:08 PM Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC (sorta) -- Anglican Chant, Eucharistic Psalmody, = etc. (LONG)   <SNIP>     > I'm certainly willing to be corrected, but as far as I know, Trinity > Wall Street was the first thing RESEMBLING a British choral foundation > in this country, and the present church was consecrated on Ascension > Day, 1846 ... I don't have the complete history of Trinity at hand, but > Edward Hodges was Organist from 1846 until 1859, and he is generally > credited with establishing choral services on the "cathedral model" in > the Anglican Church in this country.   <SNIP>   > It wasn't until the tempestuous collaboration of Erben and Hodges at > Trinity in 1846 that we have an organ of some size in an American > Anglican Church, if I'm not mistaken. Given that, isn't it likely that > most earlier choral establishments were more along the lines of the old > west gallery choirs? > > Cheers, > > Bud > See "English Cathedral Music in New York: Edward Hodges," by John = Ogasapian. You can find this at   http://store.yahoo.com/ohscatalog/ogencatmusin.html   It is a fascinating book. I worked for some years at Old St. Paul's, Baltimore, an interesting (visually, but sadly not acoustically) only Romanesque building by Richard Upjohn. Edward Hodges had two sons (that I know about). One was George Fredirick Handel Hodges, the other John Sebastian Bach Hodges! The latter began a vested choir of men and boys at Old St. Paul's in 1873. I am not sure when St. Paul's School began, but it is now a very large establishment for boys and girls, and that choir of = Men and Boys, still going strong, as far as I know, is drawn from the school, the boys, at least. There is a fine, endowed choir room on the top floor = of one of the school buildings, which includes good music library facilities. The boys, and the men at least one evening, rehearse at the school. It was always said there that this was the second oldest still existing choir of men and boys, the first being the choir of All Saints' Church, Worcester, MA, where the good Peter Stoltzfus has just taken over the position.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler, up to his nose in Finale at the moment.      
(back) Subject: Re: Saint Niccola, was RE: Holidays in Caracas 02 From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:03:50 -0500   On 12/18/03 8:40 AM, "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> wrote:   > Nicola di Bari was born in Lycia, Asia Minor; became Bishop of Myra in As= ia > Minor and died there in 344 average.   Thank you, Andr=E9s. But that still leaves me with the question, Why would h= e have (or be known by) an Italian name, with "di Bari" attached to his name--in view of his (apparently) never having had pizza there? (Even posthumously by seven centuries!) Since his episcopal throne was in Myra, shouldn't he be called "Nicola (?) of Myra"?   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Princess pedalboard practice (was Advice on Allen) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:06:33 -0600   Hello, I think it depends on how much you will get to practice on the AGO pedalboard. When I got my church jobs last summer the non-AGO pedalboards drove me crazy. It was almost worthless to try to play anything that I didn't have memorized so that I could look at my feet. Then we got a new organ at school which had a flat pedalboard. After I physically realized that pedalboard doesn't mean AGO, my church work became much easier. I think if you can make both "standard" to your body or do away with the idea of "standard" at all, you should be fine. Just make sure you have a chance to practice on the AGO before you have to play. Just my 2 cents. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: tom carter <tcarter215@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 06:26:06 -0800 (PST) Subject: Re: Princess pedalboard practice (was Advice on Allen)   > > > > Can anybody out there tell me from experience how it goes switching > from a "princess" pedalboard for practicing purposes to an AGO-standard > for performing...am I shooting myself in the feet by practicing on a > smaller pedalboard? > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------- > -------------------------------- > "If memory serves, the Rondo had a 25-note pedalboard whereas the T-12 > series had the 32-note "princess" pedalboard (i.e., the pedals are > narrower and shorter than AGO). There may have been other differences > between the two. T-12A and T-12B were effectively the same organ with > speakers being the only significant distinction -- "A" had console > speakers and "B" had external "gyro" cabinet only" > > > > > > > > --------------------------------- > Do you Yahoo!? > New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing      
(back) Subject: Re: Schuke vs Shulke vs Schuelke und Bier From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:06:33 -0500   On 12/18/03 9:25 AM, "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> wrote:   > As for the brewery sponsoring organs <BIG sigh> I wish that our Polar > brewery here (the largest is south America as far as I am informed) would > show some interest in that....... :)   I will hope for your success in that endeavor! At least the precedent is now quite sufficiently established.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: AGO Bench Height From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:13:17 -0600   Shouldn't they have a standard leg length, from knee to toe? If your leg does not fit that standard, I think the surgery to correct this should be provided by a staff AGO leg surgeon, who's sole job is to standardize = every leg length in the country.   Sorry, couldn't resist.   Mike Franch Madison, WI   _________________________________________________________________ Tired of slow downloads? Compare online deals from your local high-speed providers now. https://broadband.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Saint Niccola, was RE: Holidays in Caracas 02 From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 12:17:00 -0500   In a message dated 12/18/2003 10:03:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, = acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > But that still leaves me with the question, Why would he > have (or be known by) an Italian name, with "di Bari" > attached to his > name   isn't it obvious?? He played bari sax in a couple of pick-up big = bands.....  
(back) Subject: Re: Is Anglican chant becoming a dead art? From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 12:07:55 -0600   At St. Andrew's (Woodhaven) in Winnipeg, Canada, our Choral Communion services always include the Psalm set for the day. We say these psalms with congregation at 8:00; sing them with congregation at 9:00 and sing them with choir and congregation at 10:30. But we also have Matins at least twice a month at both the 9:00 and 10:30 services and sing both psalms and canticles. I believe, however, that we are one of only a few local Anglican churches to use Anglican chant on a routine basis. Pity.   Russ         On Wednesday, December 17, 2003, at 12:45 PM, bruce.shaw@shaw.ca wrote:   > If I understand correctly, a number of years ago there was a push by > some Anglican churches to have every service be Mass rather than > alternating Mass and Matins/Morning Prayer or whatever the previous > arrangement was. Many churches no longer have the draw to justify > Evensong. As a result, there is no service which has the Psalms as > part of the liturgy. Hence there is little opportunity to do Anglican > chant.    
(back) Subject: Otto Winter From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 19:03:59 -0500   Over the years I seem to have collected four CDs of Otto Winter playing "Silbermann Orgel".   All these CDs are "El Cheapo" CDs from Pilz from around the early 1990's, and there are no notes at all with the CDs.   Can anyone tell me if Otto Winter is still performing, is he reckoned as being a good organist? I would like to be able to play as well as he = does!   The other thing that I would like to know is although the label says that he is playing a Silbermann organ, - does anyone know which Silbermann = organ it is?   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Edward Hodges at Trinity New York From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 20:02:10 -0600     > ----- Original Message ----- > From: <quilisma@cox.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 9:08 PM > Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC (sorta) -- Anglican Chant, Eucharistic Psalmody, etc. > (LONG) > > I'm certainly willing to be corrected, but as far as I know, Trinity > > Wall Street was the first thing RESEMBLING a British choral foundation > > in this country, and the present church was consecrated on Ascension > > Day, 1846 ... I don't have the complete history of Trinity at hand, = but > > Edward Hodges was Organist from 1846 until 1859, and he is generally > > credited with establishing choral services on the "cathedral model" in > > the Anglican Church in this country.   Trinity, Wall Street certainly had a pipe organ from the middle of the eighteenth century, and did some quite elaborate music. William Tuckey (1708-1781) was the Parish Clerk and de facto Director of Music during the Revolutionary War period, and was responsible, among other things, for the first performance of Handel's Messiah in the United States.   Trinity Church also seems to have sung Anglican chant quite early on. = This is true of other Episcopal churches too, such as St. Peter's Church and Christ Church in Philadelphia, both of which are believed to have used Anglican chant in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. = Ruth M. Wilson's recent book, "Anglican Chant and Chanting in England, = Scotland, and America 1660 to 1820" (OUP) even goes so far to suggest that outside = of English cathedrals and major choral foundations, ordinary parishes in the Episcopal Church of Scotland and the Protestant Episcopal Church of the = USA were actually ahead of ordinary parishes in the Church of England in adopting Anglican chant. The first Episcopal Hymnal -- the Musical Supplement to the Prayer Book of 1789, contains four Anglican chants, including a well-known one by Garrett Colley Wellesley, First Lord Mornington and father of the Duke of Wellington, which is still found in most psalters today. The Scots Episcopalian organist Robert Bremner was probably the main force behind the introduction of Anglican chant in Scotland, and his younger brother, James Bremner (d. 1780) was organist of Christ Church, Philadelphia, and probably the main proponent of Anglican chant in eighteenth-century America. Benjamin Carr (1768-1831), organist = of St. Augustine's Roman Catholic Church and of St. Peter's Episcopal Church = in Philadelphia, was also a proponent of Anglican chant. He published a treatise called "The Chorister" which you can find on the Library of Congress website. (Go to http://memory.loc.gov/ click on "Collection Finder" then "Performing Arts" then type in "Benjamin Carr" and click on "Search." Several items by Carr including "The Chorister" will come up.) This contains quite a bit of service music including Anglican chant.   > > It wasn't until the tempestuous collaboration of Erben and Hodges at > > Trinity in 1846 that we have an organ of some size in an American > > Anglican Church, if I'm not mistaken.   Dr. Hodges certainly moved Trinity Church further in the direction of the English cathedral tradition, although his successor, Cutler (whose first name temporarily escapes me) deserves if anything more credit, since he = was the man responsible for introducing a surpliced men-and-boys choir, etc.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: AGO Bench Height From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 20:12:38 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 9:13 AM Subject: RE: AGO Bench Height     > Shouldn't they have a standard leg length, from knee to toe? If your leg > does not fit that standard, I think the surgery to correct this should = be > provided by a staff AGO leg surgeon, who's sole job is to standardize every > leg length in the country.   His name is Dr. Procrustes, if I recall correctly.   John    
(back) Subject: Reminder-Tony O'Brien in Rochester Sunday afternoon (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:34:13 -0500   RTOS is proud to feature Tony O'Brien playing a holiday concert on our Wurlitzer 4/23 on Sunday afternoon, December 21 starting at 2:30 PM. This event is at the extensively remodeled NEW Auditorium Theatre, 875 East = Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Tickets will go on sale at the box office at 1:30 priced at only $15 each. Please visit http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ for driving directions and much more info.   Following the concert, we will celebrate the 75th birthday of our = Wurlitzer opus 1951 with an on-stage party including cake and punch at no charge to the audience. Please join us for this grand afternoon of entertainment and birthday celebration.   Submitted by Ken Evans, RTOS Director