PipeChat Digest #4171 - Wednesday, December 24, 2003
 
Re: the Jesuits
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
mystery piece
  by "Anya/Andreas" <atal@sympatico.ca>
Re: Dubois Seven Last Words
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
OFF-TOPIC: Re: the Jesuits
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: my funniest "Messiah" story (X-posted)
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Service of Nine Lessons and Carols, St Stephen's Canterbury
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@sbarker.net>
Re: Dubois Seven Last Words
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: Re: the Jesuits
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Sorry
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Dubois Seven Last Words
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: mystery piece
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
"Reus est mortis"
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
Fwd: WANAMAKER ORGAN AND PETER JENNINGS, WORLD NEWS TONIGHT
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
BEST WISHES TO ALL OF YOU
  by "Hans-Friedrich Hell" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: the Jesuits
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Wesley Choral Song and Fugue (X-POST)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: the Jesuits From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 17:05:47 -0500   On 12/23/03 3:06 PM, "quilisma@cox.net" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Not protty at all ... the protestants GOT it from the Catholics (grin). >=20 I THOROUGHLY believe you, Bud. But I AM surprised. (OK, "astonished, bewildered, and shocked.") Prots were neither exactly nor noticeably big on importing things "from the Catholics" in those days. (To put it mildly.= ) In 1943, our family relocated, joined a new congregation, and I (age 11) wa= s SHOCKED to see a statue (identifiable as being of Jesus) in the chancel. I was afeared that we'd stumbled into some kind of horrible clutches of the pagan papists, and my parents hadn't even NOTICED!   (The statue was a miniature copy of the "Christus" of Thorvaldsen in the (Lutheran) Cathedral of Our [gasp] Lady in Copenhagen. It was an ethnicall= y very Norwegian parish, with lutefisk suppers and all.)   Can you mention one more thing, small or large, that prots (or Lutherans, o= r even Anglicans) for that matter) "GOT . . . from the Catholics" between, say, American Independence (or Jamestown in 1607) and Vatican II or so?   In short, I'm "believing" you--but somewhat against my instincts. My recollection is that no prots had (or wanted) the vaguest IDEA of what the "bead-mumblers" DID in their pagan temples! A Methodist (for example) adopting a Jesuit practice is just too much to CONTEMPLATE!   (And yet, yes, we had "Tre Ore" [even CALLED it that!] every Good Friday. So maybe you=B9re right after all! Anything more?)   Alan   (ONE thing the prots got from Rome: Puritanism. Rome bought it from Tom Aquinas [who got it, allegedly, from the Greeks=8Bread =B3renaissance=B2] in c. 1200, and the prots bought it and carried it north, hook, line, and sinker, and soon brought it to America. (It swamped every aspect of Western European culture in the 19th C.) Think Victoria 200 years later. And I needn't list the hang-ups of American "religious [=8Cright=B9]" life that flow therefrom. But if I DID have to I'd start with Jerry Falwell, Freddie Phelps, RC seminary dorms, and you can take it from there.)            
(back) Subject: mystery piece From: "Anya/Andreas" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 17:09:26 -0500   A few years ago I heard a choral work (Christmas) that had been recently commisioned by - I think- the Baltimore Symphony. It was a suite of "folk-tunish" carols, using various more or less nonsensical foreign-sounding languages. If this rings a bell for anyone, I'd = appreciate knowing the composer and title. Thanks in advance,   Andreas Thiel    
(back) Subject: Re: Dubois Seven Last Words From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 17:43:36 -0500   (big snip)=20   > The earthquake at the end, of course, is virtually impossible to > reproduce on the organ ... there is simply no way to mimic those biting > string tremolandos. As somebody said, it can quickly disintegrate into > sounding like the Hammond B-3 background music for "Plan Nine From Outer > Space" (grin). >=20 > At the VERY least, I'd go back to the full orchestral score of the > Dubois and write the most important melodies back into the piano-vocal > or organ score. I BELIEVE the orchestral score is still available from > Kalmus; I don't know if G. Schirmer still prints or rents it, or the > orchestral parts. I know that when I went looking for them, I FOUND them > eventually.   I once had the pleasure - truly!! - of doing this work with full orchestra and choir in a place where the organ was in the rear gallery -- "where it belongs" [editorial comment - :-) ] The score is quite skillfully done by someone who obviously knew the French 19th-century romantic operatic style, and for the most part the parts "lie" well for the instruments, which always helps a performance to succeed.   The earthquake scene required some particular rehearsal, including getting the string tremolos "just right," etc., etc. What was WONDERFUL was to let all that "thrilling" earthquake sound calm down into an interlud= e by the organ, what Dubois marks "Grand Orgue," which means the large organ in the back of -- this case -- L'Eglise de Madleine in Paris, that marvelou= s Cavaill=E9-Coll, and Not just the choir organ in the front of the church that usually accompanied the choir. The symbolism is TERRIFIC: after all of th= e foregoing music and texts, "it's now time for the congregation's response," though I do wonder if the congregation's response was vicarious and not active. =20   In our case, we handed out the well-known closing "chorale" of the work to the congregation, and when the organ began to signal, in effect, that it was now the congregation's time to respond, I turned around and had the congregation stand to sing. The podium was high enough and the people's sight-lines good enough to enable me to conduct the congregation as they sang. A spiritual experience? You bet it was!! And there was no applause= !   By the way: for the closing hymn, I re-did the main singing theme from Beethoven's Choral Fantasie in the key of A for the organ and orchestra to lead the congregation in singing the text of LBW 93 "Jesus, Refuge of the Weary," complete with an interlude between stanzas 2 and 32 drawn precisely from the Beethoven score -- but without piano.   Someone has commented on how this work and others like it by Stainer, Maunder, et al, used to be _verboten_ among persons of "good taste." So were Guilmant sonatas _verboten_. I'd like to think that we've passed beyond that narrowness of perspective to a point where we can both judge each work on its own merits but not be limited to a particular group of aesthetic expressions, SO LONG AS there are not other complicating factors such as Sousa-like sounds to accompany a Lenten text, etc., etc. (Watch it= : I REALLY LIKE SOUSA MARCHES AND WOULD HAVE USED ANY NUMBER OF THEM IN COUNTERPOINT CLASS, HAD I TAUGHT COUNTERPOINT.) So I'm glad to see positive discussion of Dubois' _Seven Words_.   Doing this on the organ alone is as hard as accompanying the Verdi Requiem at the organ -- I've done THAT, though never Dubois. Orchestral accompaniments at the organ and be some of the most challenging tasks we ever face!! Try accompanying the Sanctus from the Durufl=E9 _Requiem Mass_ and you'll find out how tough it can be!!   So my hat's off to Charlie Lester, yet with a little bit of concern whether the total experience of that orchestra score at the organ alone can be sufficiently well done to make the entire experience satisfactory. Charlie should hire a mighty good organist -- not me.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: Re: the Jesuits From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:52:03 -0800   Alan, I'm going to move this discussion over to another list we both belong to, UNLESS other folks are interested. It IS rather off-topic for PipeChat (grin).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: my funniest "Messiah" story (X-posted) From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 16:48:17 -0600   Way to go Bud! I played for a wedding, the Hinners console was right next to the edge of the balcony, I turned a page and it went sailing over the edge and floated so graciously over the top of many surprised people = below. I had the soloist( who at the time was not singing, yea) to run down and = get it. Lots of laughter from below and a big red face from above. Just finished tuning my house organ, 5 ranks and my 80 year old mom holding = keys. I am ready for a drink now! lots of drink. Merry Christmas ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@cox.net> To: "AnglicanMusicLiturgyandControversy" <AnglicanMusicLiturgyandControversy@yahoogroups.com>; <anglican-music@list.stsams.org>; "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "GL Church Musicians" <glchurchmusicians@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, December 23, 2003 1:29 PM Subject: my funniest "Messiah" story (X-posted)     > My funniest Messiah story has to do with a transplanted Aeolian > residence organ that once stood in the Methodist Church in Bartow FL. > > It had been a player organ; the player mechanism had been removed; but > it was still the original console ... the music rack could still be > raised to get to the (now-empty) player box to change the rolls. When > the music rack was "down" in playing position, the bottom rested on two > brass pins that fit into slots to keep it at the proper angle. > > You guessed it ... I slammed a page-turn; the pins came out of the > slots, tilting the music rack and dumping the whole score in my lap, > AFTER it had bounced off the Swell and Great manuals. > > I finished whatever it was from memory, picked up the score, and went on > (chuckle). > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Service of Nine Lessons and Carols, St Stephen's Canterbury From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@sbarker.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 22:53:25 +0000   Service of Nine Lessons and Carols St Stephen's Church, Canterbury, UK   Carol Once in royal David=92s city Bidding prayer First lesson Choir Carol The truth from above arr. Vaughan-Williams Carol Wake, O wake! Second Lesson Choir Carol Bogor=F3ditse Dj=E9vo Arvo Part Carol It came upon a midnight clear Third Lesson Choir Carol People look East trad carol Carol Long ago, prophets knew Fourth Lesson Choir Carol (Trebles) O my dear heart Peter Aston Carol O little town of Bethlehem Fifth lesson Handbells Carol Hark! The herald angels sing Sixth lesson Choir Carol Gaudete! Christus est natus trad Carol Silent night Seventh lesson Choir Carol (Men) Quem Pastores German Carol Carol While shepherds watched (to Cranbrook) Eighth lesson Choir Carol Torches J. Joubert Carol God rest you merry, gentlemen Ninth lesson Carol O come all ye faithful Prayer and Blessing Organ voluntary In Dulce Jubilo J.S. Bach       Steve     (Apologies for the formatting - I've copied it from the sheet I prepared for the choir and it's lost its clarity coverting to plain text!)          
(back) Subject: Re: Dubois Seven Last Words From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 15:04:06 -0800       Karl Moyer wrote:   >(snip)   > The earthquake scene required some particular rehearsal, including > getting the string tremolos "just right," etc., etc. What was = WONDERFUL > was to let all that "thrilling" earthquake sound calm down into an = interlude > by the organ, what Dubois marks "Grand Orgue," which means the large = organ > in the back of -- this case -- L'Eglise de Madeleine in Paris, that = marvelous > Cavaill=E9-Coll, and NOT just the choir organ in the front of the church = that > usually accompanied the choir. The symbolism is TERRIFIC: after all of = the > foregoing music and texts, "it's now time for the congregation's = response," > though I do wonder if the congregation's response was vicarious and not > active. > > In our case, we handed out the well-known closing "chorale" of the = work > to the congregation, and when the organ began to signal, in effect, that = it > was now the congregation's time to respond, I turned around and had the > congregation stand to sing. The podium was high enough and the people's > sight-lines good enough to enable me to conduct the congregation as they > sang. A spiritual experience? You bet it was!! And there was no = applause! >   I imagine that the closing "Adoramus te, Christe" immediately made the "Top Ten" in Catholic music circles, because it's in virtually EVERY late 19th century/early 20th century Catholic choirbook; so if it wasn't sung by the congregation at the first performance, I'd be VERY surprised if it WASN'T at subsequent performances.   I have encountered the congregation singing the closing "Adoramus te, Christe" in this country as well ... Catholics of a certain age had it memorized, along with "O Salutaris" and "Tantum ergo," as it was often sung between the end of Stations of the Cross and the beginning of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament during Lent.   Wonder of wonders, it also appears (in English) in the otherwise Gaither-laden "Hymns for the Family of God" (!).   The thing that struck me the MOST about the orchestration is the extremely skillful exploitation of the COLOR of both the individual instruments AND the choirs ... woodwind in particular, as I recall.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: Re: the Jesuits From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 18:25:07 -0500   On 12/23/03 5:52 PM, "quilisma@cox.net" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Alan, I'm going to move this discussion over to another list we both > belong to, UNLESS other folks are interested. It IS rather off-topic for > PipeChat (grin). > Oh, super good! I just two minutes suggested that kind of thing to you!   I'm looking forward, and for the same reason!!! Yes, yes yes!!!!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Sorry From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 18:39:37 -0500   I'm saying this publicly. Bud and I have been hacking away.   We both (simultaneously) thought it might be inappropriate.   Thanks very much to the listowners (and all of you) for their/your = gracious indulgence.   And sorry for taking up time inappropriately. (If you MUST know how the conversation goes, you know how to ask.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Dubois Seven Last Words From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 17:58:47 -0600   At 9:49 AM -0800 12/23/03, quilisma@cox.net wrote: >I have two problems with the Dubois as typically presented: the >English translation, and the use of the organ only for accompaniment. > >A number of years ago I heard a recording of it performed in the >original Latin with the original orchestral accompaniment. It was a >revelation. > >The translation is an odd mixture of Latin word order and an attempt >to conform the text to the KJV ... matching the word accents to the >musical accents goes by the boards far more often than it should as >a result. > >For example: the opening soprano solo ... "O vos omnes" is one of >the most ancient laments in the Christian liturgy. "O my people", >with its "e" vowel sound replacing the open "o" vowel of the >original on the high note strikes a jarring note (for me, at least) >right off the bat. > >Replacing "Reus est mortis" with "he of death is guilty" ... well, >you see my point (grin). > >The G. Schirmer edition (both the piano-vocal score AND the organ >score) omits a LOT of the orchestral color and counter-melodies, >though the organ score makes MORE of an attempt to be faithful to >the original.   Besides the G. Shirmer edition there also is an edition that was published by J. Fischer & Bros. Some of the translations are different than the Schirmer ones and seem to fall better with the vocal lines. It also has many more orchestral "cues" in it than the Schirmer edition. I doubt that it is still available however. But since it was copyrighted in 1902 it is probably out of copyright.   G. Schirmer did publish the full Orchestra parts and Score that was available for purchase. Somewhere around here I do have a complete set.   RE: the Earthquake - it can be pulled off on the organ BUT it would help to have someone that can both improvise and also has played theatre organ to do it! <G> My teacher, when he used to do the Dubois, which was an annual event, basically forgot about the score for the earthquake and did his own version only using about the last 12 or some measures as written so the choir would know where he was at. His theatre organ playing did come in handy. Of course, having an big Open Wood and putting your foot across the bottom 5 keys on the pedalboard does help! <G>   David  
(back) Subject: Re: mystery piece From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 19:33:53 EST   In a message dated 12/23/03 5:12:35 PM Eastern Standard Time, atal@sympatico.ca writes:   << A few years ago I heard a choral work (Christmas) that had been = recently commisioned by - I think- the Baltimore Symphony. It was a suite of "folk-tunish" carols, using various more or less nonsensical foreign-sounding languages. If this rings a bell for anyone, I'd = appreciate knowing the composer and title. >>   I live in Baltimore, (but don't make enough money to go hear the multibore =   symphony - besides, I'm one of the people who is ticked off at the = organization for abolishing the Symphony Chorus a couple of years ago.) Anyway, you = could contact them, or the librarian, Mary Plaine, to get the information. <A HREF=3D"http://www.baltimoresymphony.org/index.asp">Click here: Baltimore = Symphony Orchestra</A>   Richard  
(back) Subject: "Reus est mortis" From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 18:15:44 -0800   =3D-> Replacing "Reus est mortis" with "he of death is guilty" .... well, you see my point (grin). <-=3D       Actually in the Schirmer edition that particular text is "He is death - guilty!" :   Tenor solo: Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do. (Matthew 27:46)   Baritone solo: And the people clamor'd:   Chorus: He is death-guilty; He is death-guilty; take him, take him, let us crucify him! [.... etc.] Be his blood on us, and on our children! Then they did crucify Jesus, and the two thieves; one at His right hand, the other at His left hand.   ---------------------   Then as to those who lament doing the work with organ only and in English ... well, those are, at present, the only conditions under which I feel I can present it.   My church has absolutely zero budget for "extras" (we even have had to borrow copies of the score, and the organist's fee is being covered by a patron), so hiring instrumentalists is simply out of the question.   Not to mention the additional chaos that would be thrown into the mix --- this church has never presented a major work like this so I feel it would be wisest to adapt the "Less is More" credo this first time around; then if it's a success do it again next year with more "goodies."   I will state, however, that being a LCMS Lutheran congregation, they will never go for doing it in Latin. We'll just have to suffer through what's "lost in the translation" or not do it all.   Given those alternatives....... which would be better? To do a "low-brow" version of it, or not do it at all?   Thanks for everyone's input, nonetheless.   ~ ~~~ ~~~~~~~ Charlie Lester   P.S.: When I was a very small child, about 3-4 yrs old, my mother - who is a retired choral director - conducted this very same work in a Baptist church in Virginia. I clearly remember the "He is death - guilty!" chorus and being absolutely terrified upon hearing it.      
(back) Subject: Fwd: WANAMAKER ORGAN AND PETER JENNINGS, WORLD NEWS TONIGHT From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 20:41:12 -0600   i received the following and am passing it on   David   > >> >>Official information has been received from the producer for Peter >>Jennings World News Tonight, which, on the East coast, is on the >>ABC network, at 6:30 PM to 7 PM Eastern Standard Time for the >>showing on CHRISTMAS EVE of their recent visits to the Wanamaker >>Organ and Light Show at Lord & Taylor in the Wanamaker Building in >>Philadelphia. >> >> this will be on a National Broadcast including shots and sounds of >>the Wanamaker Organ and Light Show. >> >>A friend was there for the taping and was a VOLUNTEER helper to >>the crew and it was SO exciting to have been a very tiny wee part >>of their audio and visual taping and recording of the hourly Light >>Show and the twice daily concerts on the Wanamaker Organ; >>interviews with Peter Richard Conte, Organist and L Curt Mangel >>III, Curator and Ray Biswanger, President of the Friends of the >>Wanamaker Organ; and audio and visual taping inside the Wanamaker >>Organ chambers. >> >>This will be shown CHRISTMAS EVE unless some national catastrophe >>happens and it gets bumped off the air. I have no idea of the >>length of time that will be allotted to this segment of the Peter >>Jennings program. > > > - if you could let the lists know about this - it would be great - >They're slowly removing parts of the light show which has been there >since the 1950's - first the dancing fountains, then the huge Christmas >Tree, & this year the Santa train - I wish everyone would write Lord & >Taylor's parent company & let them know we want it back. >The May Company >Jan Effers >Priesdent & CHief Executive Officer >424 Fifth Ave >New York, N.Y. >10018   -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: BEST WISHES TO ALL OF YOU From: "Hans-Friedrich Hell" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: 24 Dec 2003 04:05 GMT   Dear listmembers and friends,   Those of you, who enjoy our Holiday Season greetings year after year on ano= ther personal greeting cards, will probably miss them this year. In a time = of limited funds and high expenses we thought, that this year we will greet= our friends in a different way: we will do it simply by e-mail. We do it h= ereby using this wonderful list. And we do it personally to all of our frie= nds, whose e-mail addresses we have. All other friends, who don't have an e= -mail address, will continue to receive our written personal greetings. Of = course, such way we saved quite a bit of money, which we decided to use to = support our common profession. This way we divided the eralier budgeted, bu= t now saved money on production- und mailing expenses and made three donati= ons in favor of:=20   -=09the American Guild of Organists -=09the Organ Historical Society -=09the organ department of The Curtis Institute of Music   Today, on Christmas Eve 2003 (Heiliger Abend 2003) we look gratefully back = to another year in Felix's career. It was busy as ever, here and there even= a little bit troublesome, in particular in the course of Felix's education= , where we had to make a severe decision. In this regard we might have even= hurt some feelings. If so, we both, Felix and I, hereby humbly ask for fo= rgiveness.   We are very blessed to have the continuing personal and praying support of = a growing circle of friends. In particular we thank Dr. John Weaver, Dr. Ma= rtin Jean, and Donald Sutherland, who have accompanied Felix the last semes= ter so compently and wizely as his teachers and friends.   Together with our whole family Felix and I enjoy this Holiday Season again.= And, besides all joy, we certainly will take our time and contemplate abou= t mystery of Christmas, and its consequences on our lives. But the calendar= goes on, and for Christians things are getting quite serious soon after Ch= ristmas. Above all joy today: Good Friday is not too far away. Between Palm= Sunday's =93Hosanna=94 and the =93Crucify=94 of Maundy Thursday are only a= few days.   Think about that, if you have the opportunity to make your decision, whethe= r to continue to support a friend or to withdraw your support, whether to u= nderstand the different thinking persons or to judge about them, whether to= approve or disapprove the different from your believings, whether to analy= se the reasons for a different faith or to categorically condemn it, and, f= inally, whether to love or to hate. Sometimes it might be a surprise, that = the person(s) we hate might be closer to us than we might think.   Merry and Peaceful Christmas to all of you and your loved ones.   Hans-Friedrich Hell Felix Hell          
(back) Subject: Re: the Jesuits From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2003 00:13:26 EST   Dear Alan:   The Jesuits get blamed for everything. Thomas Aquinas for everything else. I think you'll have to admit that puritanical ideas served to keep the = peace for quite some hundreds of years. You must also admit that paganism has returned to roost on the U.S of A. There are forces attempting to = remove God from every facit of public life. The end result, more crime, and evil. Our courts are filled with frivolous cases brought by individuals to = overturn God. We had relative Peace when people relyed on God, rather than their own judgement. Turn O Man back to God!   How can we ever really retire?   Ron    
(back) Subject: Wesley Choral Song and Fugue (X-POST) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2003 00:25:48 -0600   Hi! Yes, I know, I'm always asking questions...but this list is such a great resource!!   Does anyone know where I can find the S.S. Wesley Choral Song and Fugue??? I have the Choral Song sep. but can't find the fugue anywhere. I just listened to a great recording of it by Ken Cowan at St. Luke's in Evanston (JAV Recordings Strikes the Gold Mine AGAIN!) and realized that the fugue is very nice too.   Incidentally, in addition to the above mentioned CD I also recently purchased Todd Wilson's recording with his daughter Rachel of music for cello and organ and Gerre Hancock's recording at Washington National Cathedral. All three are very enjoyable listening. I think JAV is officially my favorite record label!   Advent Blessings, Beau Surratt Minister of Worship and Music United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago