PipeChat Digest #4179 - Monday, December 29, 2003
 
Re: copyright laws
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: Typo
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
New Year's Eve Concert - Little Rock, AR
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
New Year's Eve Concert - Little Rock, AR
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re. Felix's 2003 retrospect. THANK YOU and recital announcement
  by "Hans-Friedrich Hell" <hell-concerts@t-online.de>
Re: sorta off-topic: RC liturgical rules and usages
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings
  by "John Cormack" <cormackj@comcast.net>
RE: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings
  by "Harry E. Martenas" <harrym@epix.net>
Re: sorta off-topic: RC liturgical rules and usages
  by <jsolen@optonline.net>
Re: sorta off-topic: RC liturgical rules an
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Re: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
My Christmas gift for 2003 (really!), Part 1 of 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
"The Pianist" movie
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: copyright laws From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 02:02:42 -0800 (PST)   Yes, Richard Purvis' Greensleeves was first published by Leeds... and then later on it was published in a MCA publication formerly distributed by Hal Leonard. I don't even know if that publication is still in print...   At any rate, now you have some other possibilities to follow up on...   One other suggestion: are you near a university that has a Dept. of Music, and preferably a Music Library? Librarians can often find out information (or tell you where it may be found) that is elusive... Call first, to make an appointment (the librarian will probably faint when you say that you would like to "make an appointment)... in that way the librarian can do some looking before you arrive...   Some public libraries even have rather big collections of music, e. g., Richmond, Virginia (at least they did a number of years ago) ...     Best wishes to all     Morton Belcher fellow list member     --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 12/27/2003 5:19:23 PM Central > Standard Time, > mura@speakeasy.net writes: > I'm having a similar problem although it has nothing > to do with church > music ... so feel free not to read on! But I'm > posting just in case > someone might have some suggestions for me, I think > I've tried everything. > > My father, Louis Kievman, was a violist who did a > transcription for viola > and piano in 1945 of a Kabalevsky piece for violin > and piano > ("Improvisation to Night of St. Petersburg, Op. 21, > No. 1, 1934) which was > published by Leeds. Leeds of course is out of > business. I checked with > Universal, one of the successor publishers, but they > don't have the > rights. (All they could tell me is that don't have > them, no suggestion was > made as to where I might check next.) > > This is important because a violist has requested > permission to record my > Dad's work but we can't find out who has the real > rights. At least not yet. > > The Library of Congress shows nothing for a > copyright under my father's > name. They have some instruction books he wrote, > but not this transcription. > > A professor at the Boston Conservatory suggested > that perhaps the rights > have reverted to Sikorski -- they apparently have > the rights to the > original Kabalevsky piece. Sikorski has not > responded to two emails and > while I might hear from them in a few days, I'm > assuming NOT. > > Frank Music suggested I check with BMI and ASCAP, > but they also have not > responded to email inquiries ... although I only > wrote to them within the > past week so I'm happy to give them more time. > > But finding out who has the rights to a work like > this when the publisher > no longer exists can be problematic! The family is > very happy to have > Brett record this piece ... but will the holder of > the rights (if there is > one) be quite so happy if permission isn't > obtained?? > > Mura     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now http://companion.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Typo From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 07:46:51 -0500       That's not a typo! It's an opto. When I was very young, I read the very stylized signature on the old Moller nameplates as "h. peholler" Look at one sometime!     Jim     On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 23:02:59 -0500 <brentmj@charter.net> writes: > I have to pass along a fun typo: > > http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/7578618.htm > > Brent Johnson > ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand > http://www.organlive.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >         Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. But it rocks absolutely too.  
(back) Subject: New Year's Eve Concert - Little Rock, AR From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 08:26:59 -0600   Eric Suter, Organist and Associate Choirmaster at Washington National Cathedral will be laying a recital on December 31, 2003 at 7:30 PM on the Nichols & Simpson Organ at Christ Church, Little Rock, AR. This event is sponsored by the Central Arkansas Chapter, AGO and is a gift to the community from Dr. Richard Hixson who sponsors a recital every year for his Birthday.   Mr. Suter's program will be:   Imperial March, Op. 32 - Edward Elgar/George C. Martin Gospel Preludes, Book 1 - "What a Friend We Have in Jesus!" - William = Bolcom Pi  
(back) Subject: New Year's Eve Concert - Little Rock, AR From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 08:33:27 -0600   WOOPS! - I hit the wrong key and sent this incomplete - Sorry   ******************************************************************** Eric Suter, Organist and Associate Choirmaster at Washington National Cathedral will be laying a recital on December 31, 2003 at 7:30 PM on the Nichols & Simpson Organ at Christ Church, Little Rock, AR http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com/prod01.htm. This event is sponsored by the Central Arkansas Chapter, AGO and is a gift to the community from Dr. Richard Hixson who sponsors a recital every year for his Birthday.   Mr. Suter's program will be:   Imperial March, Op. 32 - Edward Elgar/George C. Martin Gospel Preludes, Book 1 - "What a Friend We Have in Jesus!" - William = Bolcom Piece Heroique - Cesar Franck Aria - Paul Manz Prelude and Fugue in C, BWV 547 - J.S. Bach Chorale Prelude on "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" - J.S. Bach Three Chorale Preludes on "Nun komm der Heiden Heiland" - J.S. bach Fantasy on the Choral "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme", Op 52, No 2 - Max Reger   If you are in the area I hope that you will consider attending.   David  
(back) Subject: Re. Felix's 2003 retrospect. THANK YOU and recital announcement From: "Hans-Friedrich Hell" <hell-concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 16:32:21 +0100   Dear listmembers and friends,   Felix asked me to thank the list for the overwhelming reaction and good wishes of so many friends. Furthermore he asked me, to announce his graduation recital at Curtis, which will be on   April 29,2004, 8 pm, at Field Hall The Curtis Institute of Music, 1716 Locust Street, Philadelphia.   There will be a reception after the recital at the premises of Curtis. More details I will announce later.   Felix would have loved to announce this personally, but, returning from practicing yesterday night he brought home quite a flu with a temperature of 104 F. So he is seriously out of business now, so to speak, and we will be lucky, if the upcoming New Year's events will be on at all.   Thank you for your attention.   Best wishes   Hans-Friedrich Hell  
(back) Subject: Re: sorta off-topic: RC liturgical rules and usages From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 18:28:05 EST   Tina,   In your post, you referred to documents contained in an a Liturgy and = Music handbook as being the "only official documents from the church on music in =   liturgy".   I don't know what's in that book, but there quite a number of "official" documents from the church floating around, all or portions of which are = still valid. Some are rather old (such as Tra Le Sollecitudini of 1903) some = rather recent (Musicam Sacram of 1967) and many stem from official documents of = the Second Vatican Council. One document which does make some important = pronouncements on music is the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (which, if I = remember correctly, extends primacy of place to both Gregorian chant and the pipe organ!). Also, your local Ordinary (Bishop or Archbishop) can interpret = these documents to a point, as can conferences of national Bishops. The American = Bishops have in fact promulgated statements interpreting certain liturgy = documents, and I would suppose that could be seen as "official". One Bishop in whose diocese I worked allayed fears about proposed changes to the Missal by = saying "the changes will not be adopted in this diocese until I SAY they'll be = adopted". Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe this is a pretty accurate assessment.   It can be rather daunting to try to decide what's official and what's not--and what's a "primary source" document and what's an official = interpretation of a primary document and it's degree of authority. I have found that many liturgists, both lay and clerical, confuse this by blurring the = distinction between primary documents, official commentaries, and unofficial opinion and = trend. On this point you are right on. I once worked with a lay liturgist, trained (poorly) by a diocese who insisted that the Gloria must NEVER be sung but = rather said on "ordinary" Sundays and only sung on Feast days. She said she had a =   piece of paper in her office--her liturgy certificate from diocese--which = proved it! I didn't argue with her further, of course, but would love to get my = hands on the folks at the seminary that filled her head with such misconceptions--starting with the actual meaning of "Ordinary Time".   In the Roman Church, music and liturgy issues have become a kind of "how = many angels can dance on the head of a pin" conversation. The Church would be better off saying very little official about liturgical music except that = it should be of quality, clearly sacred, and respectful of both tradition and = taking the cultural background of the parish into account. In fact, for the most = part, everything I've read boils down to this when you remove the fluff. Also, liturgists and musicians should remember that much of what is contained in = them are really suggestions to begin with.   Bill H.    
(back) Subject: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings From: "John Cormack" <cormackj@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 18:30:59 -0500   Unfortunately, one has to be a member of RealPass($9.95/mo) or ABC news video on demand ($39.95/yr) to watch it. -- John Cormack   Subject: Re: Wanamaker on Peter Jennings From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 21:22:51 EST   Here is the link:   http://abcnews.go.com/sections/wnt/videofiles/Video/031224pipeorgan_video.r= am   Steve Lawson - NYC      
(back) Subject: RE: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings From: "Harry E. Martenas" <harrym@epix.net> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 19:15:36 -0500   They have a free trial option. A relatively confusing setup - but I finally saw it today.   A great piece. A little strange when they introduce Peter Conte, and say "only one of four persons to play the organ" (or similar words - I assume they meant one of four organists currently engaged to play during store hours).   If there was a quality audio and visual option, I would happily pay for it if was priced properly.   Harry Martenas Bloomsburg, PA   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On > Behalf Of John Cormack > Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 6:31 PM > To: Pipechat > Subject: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings > > > Unfortunately, one has to be a member of RealPass($9.95/mo) > or ABC news video on demand ($39.95/yr) to watch it. > -- > John Cormack      
(back) Subject: Re: sorta off-topic: RC liturgical rules and usages From: <jsolen@optonline.net> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 19:35:46 -0500   Here is what goes on at St. Patrick's RC Church in Smithtown, NY.   Saturday: 5:00PM Family Mass-Organist/Cantor 8:00PM Mass-Organist/Cantor   Sunday: 7:30AM Mass-No Music 9:00AM Mass-Folk Group 10:30AM Mass-Adult Choir (w/ their "keyboardist") 12:00Noon Mass-Organist/Cantor 5:00PM Mass-Orgnaist/Cantor   The folk group has some good musicians, but the selections are just = terrible. The only reason it has lasted is because our local school = district has one of the best music education programs in the country, and = it supplies a steady stream of high school musicians. They also do not use = the OCP Heritage Missal program which causes a need for weekly printing of = their programs. Again their stuff is WORSE than what is provided in the = Heritage Missal.   The adult choir does mostly contemporary stuff from the Heritage Missal, = hymns maybe twice a month. They are accompanied by a "keyboardist" who = neglects to use the organ most of the time in favor of the electric = keyboard. When she does use the organ, one foot is on the Crescendo the = other is playing what ever pedals the guitar chords tell her to.   The Director of Music and organist, Mr. James P. Moritz handles the other = four weekend Masses as well as holy days. He is an excellent organist, but = he doesn't have a choir, so we are lucky have good cantors and = *sometimes* good congregation singing.   He has hinted to me a few times that we might be switching to GIA and = their better Worship hymnal so we won't have to listen to any more of some = of the bad contemporary stuff.   Masses are to be as fast as possible(he has no control over this). Only 1 = or 2 of the verses from the Processional are sung. Gloria is only sung on = Christmas, Easter, weeks of Easter, and feast days( I might add that the = Gloria was recited at the Christmas Mass I went too!!) No Latin is used = except in the case of a Benediction following the 8:00PM mass on Saturday = where the O Salutaris is sung in Latin.   Our new pastor that replaced Bishop Walsh is definitely NOT improving the = music ministry.   The design of our new building did not leave any room for pipes. = Currently, we have an ADC Allen from the early 80's, which I hope will get = replaced by something newer soon. I have played on it a bit, it sounds OK, = but a newer model would be nicer for a Parish that has no hope for pipes. = The neighboring church where I take lessons has a nice 2-m Konzelman, so I = can live with pipes once a week for my lessons.   Jared Smithtown, NY      
(back) Subject: Re: sorta off-topic: RC liturgical rules an From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 19:47:06 EST   In reply to DERREINETOR's comments.   Correct in your comments about it depends whether the local Bishop chooses = to go along with those liturgical "guidelines" or "suggestions" on the music = in the Liturgy or rituals. The document(s) may appear to be the law of the = land (Nat'l Conference of Catholic Bishops gave their approval) but there is no =   enforcement mechanism or penalty for not complying. Many a local Bishop = looks the other way when priests innovate with their own personal touch by "adding" = to the Mass formula despite all that has been laid down by the Vatican and promulgated by the US Bishops Conference. They seem afraid to call = priests to task for violating, or ignoring, the rather definitive procedures laid down in = the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (which says how the Mass will be conducted and the part each participant plays...priest, deacon, various = ministers, when singing occurs and what type of music is allowed, etc.) It boils = down to a local parish priest picking and choosing what he will, or will not, follow. As-long-as it isn't illicit and the Mass ceremony is basically = valid, they can basically get away with doing whatever they want in the name of = Liturgy.   I dare say, Alan, if you are there, no Lutheran pastor would get away = with some of the freelancing Catholic priests get away with in their Masses. "    
(back) Subject: Re: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings From: "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 21:20:17 -0500   John, you can join, as I did, sign up watch the piece, which is good, and then cancell your subscription it costs no more than some time. There is a 5 day trial so your card never gets charged either. Mack   John Cormack wrote:   >Unfortunately, one has to be a member of RealPass($9.95/mo) or ABC news >video on demand ($39.95/yr) to watch it. >-- >John Cormack > >Subject: Re: Wanamaker on Peter Jennings >From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> >Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 21:22:51 EST > >Here is the link: > >http://abcnews.go.com/sections/wnt/videofiles/Video/031224pipeorgan_video.= ram > >Steve Lawson - NYC > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > >    
(back) Subject: My Christmas gift for 2003 (really!), Part 1 of 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 20:29:27 -0600   My Christmas gift for 2003 (really!)   Part 1 of 2 parts     As many of you have experienced (and I'm sure it has hurt you more than it hurt me), I had this penchant each year of weaving some fantastical malarky about an organ on Christmas Day in the "boonies" of the Sutton household. However, this year was quite different, and try as I might, I could not summon the spirit for Christmas as in years past. Rick's troubles at work had increased this year, with two demotions, the last one occurring around Labor Day, when he became road deputy on the midnight shift, no reason given. The day before Thanksgiving, his pay was cut by over ten per cent, again no reason given, although we have been painfully aware over the last three years that Rick was being punished for backing the wrong political horse in the last local election.   I had encouraged Rick to go ahead and take early retirement, but because of his youth he would have been penalized twenty per cent. He stated that he would stay his remaining year or be fired. Although there are many more days when my wifely protective homicidal ideation is above normal limits, we have managed to survive another year without major illness or misfortune, and I look forward to campaigning actively for a couple of lucky (or unlucky, however they see it) candidates in the year to come.   Before Rick's reversal in income, we had already decided with the rest of the family (also with their own individual troubles) not to exchange gifts. This was quite hard for me, because although there had been a couple years without a Christmas tree for various and sundry reasons, ever since I was seven I was buying Christmas gifts. When one is inundated with 10-15 catalogues per day, it is hard not to peruse them and not find just the right bauble for someone you love. Similarly, I sent no Christmas cards, breaking with an old tradition for me.   However, Rick's gift to me, or perhaps my gift to myself, (and yes, Rick's gift was received back in August before all his troubles, a $6,000 Ten-Tec ham radio with trimmings) was a trip to Atlanta the weekend before Christmas to hear Felix Hell play at Spivey Hall. I had not heard Felix since February in Jacksonville Beach. I also made contact with Larry Embury, resident organist at the Fox Theatre, and was able to secure tickets to the Nutcracker produced by the Atlanta Ballet, with Larry's performing before and during intermission of each show at the Fox.   Now generally I do not venture off on these trips alone - I always manage to secure a victim or two to accompany me on my organic sojourns. But most of these same folks had gigs at their own churches, and I was in a more contemplative than congenial mood. Therefore, this time I made a solitary trek into the big city.   To travel from the boonies to Hotlanta, one must first negotiate Highway 331 North, which is a two-hour drive of mostly 2-lane traffic competing with pick-up trucks and farm implements, to Montgomery. From there, there is I-85 streaking off to the east. It is this stretch that provides poignant memories for me: of the once-small hamlets - Union Springs, Tuskegee - on the way to Auburn football games when I was fourteen; of the trip with Rick to Callaway Gardens and the surrounding countryside (yes, I skipped the famous Christmas light show); of Jimmy Carter and his turn-the-cheek political policies that found so much disfavor in our Christian nation; of Columbus (to where I almost detoured, for an old friend now lives there, and there is of course the new LeTourneau I've yet to see); and of my previous trip with friends last fall to see the Mander at Peachtree Road United Methodist Church, St. Philip's with its glorious choir, the Church of Christ Scientist across from High Museum with its charming Moller, and Spivey Hall.   Even with my stopping for gas and a little side trip to find an elusive Chick-Fil-A and some saline solution at the Newnan exit, I made it to Atlanta in about four and one-half hours instead of the usual five. In no time I was pulling up to the Georgian Terrace in mid-town, tipping valets and bellmen and striding into the prettily appointed foyer and up to my cool one-bedroom suite on the fourteenth floor. I was eerily reminded of my apartment during first year law school - the floor plan was similar to the condo I shared with a daughter of a NFL umpire. Calling Larry's cell number, he and I made a date for dinner before the evening performance across the street at the Fox.   I had hoped to finally meet list member Mike Gettleman during this trip, but my obligations at work kept me from pulling together an itinerary until the last minute, and by then he was apparently already en route. I kept a watch for him, but was unsuccessful in spying him out.   Decked out in a taffeta outfit to complement Larry's tuxedo, or "work clothes" as he put it, I met him for drinks and dinner at the Terrace, where I enjoyed a filet of salmon on a bed of Brunswick stew, an unusual combination but very tasty. Then we betook ourselves across the street to the historic building, where I was able to enjoy Mighty Mo at first hand.   Larry played a 15-minute organ program of Christmas music 45 minutes before the curtain, and the Atlanta Youth Choir, which sings at the appropriate moment in the program, did 15 minutes in the lobby, which gave 15 minutes for people to find their seats. In addition, the organ was showcased during intermission. So you got four shows for the price of one, and all were equally excellent. The Atlanta Ballet and its orchestra are very good indeed, and the children's choir is hard to beat. But it was fascinating to see the large golden console rise up from the floor, and to see children's delighted faces as their parents accompanied them down to see Mighty Mo and the effortless performer. Larry made the complicated console, buttons, whistles and pedals look like so much child's play. Although theatre organ has never been my first love, to watch the magician at work, especially one as talented as Larry, is truly spellbinding. (You can find more information and the stoplist by checking out http://www.foxtheatre.org/mightyMo.htm.) In fact, a very socialist thought entered my head. I thought back of all the stories about how persons were drawn to the organ and became organists or organ builders. Because the organ recitalist gets most of his audience from their early exposure to either the theatre organist or the church organist, the recitalists should probably provide a subsidy to keep the theatre organist and church organist alive, for purposes of self-preservation if nothing else.   Oh well, enough of creative thinking. I stayed for the Nutcracker, which was fine in every way (bringing back memories of Baryshnikov and Cynthia Harvey, my very favorite Sugar Plum Fairy). Then I met Larry across the street for drinks at the charming mezzanine. We stayed talking until probably around 2:00 before we parted, and he planned to accompany me to church the next morning.   Atlanta midtown does not quiet down until about 4:00 - I listened to sirens, I guess because Grady Memorial Hospital was nearby, until then, and was somewhat reminded of my first and only trip to Washington, D.C., back when I was a naive college kid, with its abundance of noise.   More later.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: "The Pianist" movie From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 21:14:28 -0600   I have two questions about the closing scene in the movie. The protagonist is playing a piano concerto with orchestra.   (1) What is he playing? It is Chopinesque, but is it Chopin?   (2) There is an organ facade in the background. Where is this? The credits listed three Polish cities as being the major sites of the movie. Is it in Warsaw?   Thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Video of Wanamaker on Peter Jennings From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 22:42:20 -0600   At 05:30 PM 12/28/03, you wrote:   >Unfortunately, one has to be a member of RealPass($9.95/mo) or ABC news >video on demand ($39.95/yr) to watch it. >-- >John Cormack   Not entirely true....ABC will give you a five day free trial, and if you are an AOL subscriber you can obtain it through AOL NEWS which provides = ABC news pieces.   jch