PipeChat Digest #4185 - Wednesday, December 31, 2003
 
Re: Bits and Pieces...
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re:  Common INterests of organists
  by "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@cox.net>
Re: Episcopal Churches
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Episcopal Churches
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Medieval portative
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: March
  by "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Re: March
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: Episcopal Churches
  by "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com>
Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Medieval portative
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Bulletins
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Bits and Pieces... From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 10:49:31 -0000   And I am STILL using Sibelius, but on the RISC PC on which I installed it = in '95 !!!   True, I DID put another version onto the Windows PC - the one I'm using = for most other operations - incidentally, still running that ol' Windows 95 there TOO, and I can't get used to the Sibelius conventions on Windows either (being so used to the RISC shortcuts).   Why have I not up-graded ? 'Cause they ain't bust, yet. An' they're all bought and paid for .... so each further year makes the original purchase price that more economic - = and England is close enough to Scotland to learn a thing or two...   Remember that old adage ? "It's my grandfather's spade... yes, my father replaced the handle and = I've replaced the blade ..... but it's my grandfather's spade !"   I AM thinking of buying a dedicated hard-disk recording desk for handling music, exclusively. Don't you find that dedicated tools work best ?   Yours, from the bowels of the studio,   Harry [musicman] Grove   -----Original Message----- From: Jonathan Orwig <giwro@adelphia.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 30 December 2003 22:26 Subject: Re: Bits and Pieces...     >Sorry.... > >Gotta weigh in here.... I've used Finale on BOTH a Mac and a Windows >platform, >I find it MORE difficult to use on the MAC (not because it's >counter-intuituve, but >because I'm used to the Windows conventions) > >I only say this because I get tired of Windows-bashing by the Mac = folks...      
(back) Subject: Re: Common INterests of organists From: "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@cox.net> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 05:04:18 -0700   >My cats are a mystery to me. > >They await my arrival from work by sitting in the   >How do they KNOW?     >Because they are CATS!!!! We discuss this frequently over on Feline-l = ...   It's not just cats, friends. We have two dogs. The custom over the years is that at 10:00 they get a "biscuit". So, at about 2 minutes to 10, if = one of us isn't in the kitchen, they will find the one nearest to the kitchen, and sit there staring at them with those brown doggy eyes. All you have = to do is say the word "biscuit" at that time, and pandemonium! They dance almost like Snoopy does in Peanuts!   As to cats. . . no, I'd better not say it.   Dennis      
(back) Subject: Re: Episcopal Churches From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 07:51:31 EST   Bud wrote: >Major parish churches: > >St. Mary the Virgin NYC - I presume everybody knows about THAT >St. Luke's, Evanston IL - organist "retired" allegedly at bishop's = request >St. Bart's, NYC - no longer full-time? or so I've heard   As far as I know, St. Bart's is still full time. Bill Trafka will be = taking a sabbatical this year, but they have just hired one of my friends, = Preston Smith, who was at a large Episcopal church in Tampa, FL, and was also = formerly at St. Philip's, Charleston, SC, to be the Assistant Music Director (full = time) there in addition to Ken Cowan who is part-time who does most of the organ =   playing there, so I would think the music department at St. Bart's it = still quite healthy.   Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC    
(back) Subject: Re: Episcopal Churches From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 07:25:46 -0600   Hi! Eric Budzinski, a northwestern grad, who was assistant to Richard Webster his last few years at St. Luke's, served as acting OCM upon his departure. Last Sunday was Eric's last day as he has taken the post at St. Paul and the Redeemer in Hyde Park, a full time position, and will get to play the brand new Pasi tracker that is coming soon. St. Paul and the Redemmer is a wonderfully active parish with a newly remodeled worship space now with great acoustics. I'm certain that Eric's work their will be most fruitful. One of my friends at St. Luke's remarked on Sunday following the Christmastide Lessons and Carols service at which the Bishop of Chicago was present, "Nice of him to come and give us a blessing to say goodbye to the music program." His sarcasm was very apparent, amd I'm sure that St. Luke's will find a wonderful interim and a great candidate for the post. Incidentally, the interim post is being advertised on the AGO website with a salary of up to 5K per month.     Christmastide Blessings, Beau      
(back) Subject: Medieval portative From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 10:22:56 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.et.ve   We have one of these; a Mander. 2' pitch, 2 octaves (c' to c'''), stopped wood pipes, 2-fold feeder bellow at the lower rear part. It was a kit, brought and assembled in 1978 by the folks of the "Camerata". It features scaled pipes and "short" but modern standard compatible key measurements. = A lovely instrument indeed.   As a mere coincidence I am planning to build one from scratch (for now as spare time project and for my personal use :)-- just finishing the = draftwork on my "medieval" drawdesk :) until I find a *user friendly* CAD software down here in the woods.   In other context I wish everybody and everyone a happy new year 2004!   Un gran abrazo a todos [a big hug to all] Andres    
(back) Subject: Re: March From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 07:39:08 -0600   That's it! Thank you so much. This list is a wealth of info. Amy     >Re: March From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 00:05:13 -0600   A Yahoo search for "March of the Three Kings Opera" indicates that it is from Bizet's opera L'ARLESIENNE. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI    
(back) Subject: Re: March From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:39:23 -0500   Was it the Pierre Cochereau improvisation you heard?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 12/31/03 1:05 AM, Alicia Zeilenga at azeilenga@theatreorgans.com wrote:   > A Yahoo search for "March of the Three Kings Opera" indicates that it is > from Bizet's opera L'ARLESIENNE. > Alicia Zeilenga > Sub-Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > -----Original Message----- > From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 19:03:11 -0600 > Subject: March > >> I heard "March of the Kings" on ORGANLive. I really feel like it is >> part >> of a larger work, maybe I played it in youth orchestra? I did a google >> search and can only find that it is an old English carol. Is there >> another >> piece of music that sounds like that or am I mistaken? Thanks for your >> help. Amy >    
(back) Subject: RE: Episcopal Churches From: "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:40:46 -0500     what's up with smokey mary's then? Mari -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of RMB10@aol.com Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 7:52 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Episcopal Churches     Bud wrote: >Major parish churches: > >St. Mary the Virgin NYC - I presume everybody knows about THAT >St. Luke's, Evanston IL - organist "retired" allegedly at bishop's request >St. Bart's, NYC - no longer full-time? or so I've heard   As far as I know, St. Bart's is still full time. Bill Trafka will be taking a sabbatical this year, but they have just hired one of my friends, Preston Smith, who was at a large Episcopal church in Tampa, FL, and was also formerly at St. Philip's, Charleston, SC, to be the Assistant Music Director (full time) there in addition to Ken Cowan who is part-time who does most of the organ playing there, so I would think the music = department at St. Bart's it still quite healthy.   Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC    
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 21:48:18 +0800   Bud I find your post very depressing. If your posts are correct in detail there has to be something seriously wrong on the church scene in the USA. There must be something seriously wrong for you to adopt that attitude of bitterness.   I have been a church organist for 70 years and I still get a real thrill out of accompanying the service. It is exciting! In only one position was I ever paid for my efforts and then it was $2.00 a week when $2.00 was probably worth about $20 today. It covered my travelling to the church about 6 miles from my home at that time. West Australian churches by and large have organists who play for the love of it; their churches cannot afford a salary. Some may get an honorarium, some are employed part time and teach in a church school to make up their salary. I don't know one that does not love the job. Many regard it as a vocation. It is a ministry, and that is how I regard it myself.   As for NOT encouraging the young to take up church playing, your remarks are very disappointing. That would be a recipe for disaster as far as the organ as an instrument is concerned. Most orgaists play in churches. Several of the church organists in my city were trained by me, including my own son who plays in another church. The young should be encouraged to play in church. The continued existence of the pipe organ could well depend on this.   For 50 of those church years I have also trained a choir; I find that most satisfying and the appreciation of the choir and the congregation make it worth while. I am not paid for this either.   I was a teacher for 47 years in the state school system, where I was encouraged to train a school choir, which I did. Many of the school children including some who had no church affiliation came into my church choir, and hence into the church youth group. Maybe some stayed in the church.   In all my 70 years at the organ I have had nothing but encouragement from my ministers. However our Church government is a whole deal different from what you describe. Our ministers do not hold the power to hire or fire; they can not get rid of an organist. The church council is the appointing body and the minister has little say. I believe that is as it should be.   I am getting on in years now, but I hope to give another 10 years to my church as an organist, and maybe as choirmaster. At age 90 I may think of retiring! Don't let my age fool you into thinking that maybe I am kept on in sympathy for the old feller!!. I have entered the music eisteddford playing organ for the past 7 or 8 years and my scores have varied from mid 70%s to 90% with excellent critiques from the adjudicators. My marbles are all still there in very good condition! Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: quilisma@cox.net To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 15:55:58 -0800   >Alicia, I loved it too, for a very long time, despite the awful pay, >awful working conditions, awful organs (for the most part), awful >clergy (most of them). >What kept me going were the choirs (mine tended to be fanatically >loyal) and the appreciative congregations (some). >I had to retire at 59 on account of failing health. >I'm at the end of my life and my career and I have NOTHING to show >for it ... absolutely NOTHING. >I will live the balance of my life in abject poverty because I chose >to work for the Church "full-time" for most of my adult life. >((snip)) >>>I'm retired now ... would I advise a young musician to go into >church music? ABSOLUTELY NOT! >>>Cheers, >>>Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Medieval portative From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 09:16:36 -0500   Hi Andres and List,   My, those little Portatives really got around. A few days ago, I notified both Nelson Denton and the person who was interested in acquiring a Portative of the type Noel Mander made some years ago, that there is actually one of these available through the Harpsichord Clearing House. = The man who wants the Portative actually lives on the Isle of Jersey, but HCH ships anywhere, so that might work out. The price is reasonable.   Whenever the most recent Houston AGO National was, we gave away one of = those as a "door prize," drawn from those who took a ticket at our exhibit that year. I have lost track of the guy who won the instrument. Perhaps he is lurking on one of these lists, and I would love to hear if the instrument still gives pleasure.   Do have a look at www.harpsichord.com/index.html There are several small Organs available. Scrolling through the instruments available section, = there is much to admire, both harpsichords and Organs.   New Year Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Cc: <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:22 AM Subject: Medieval portative     > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.et.ve > > We have one of these; a Mander. 2' pitch, 2 octaves (c' to c'''), = stopped > wood pipes, 2-fold feeder bellow at the lower rear part. It was a kit, > brought and assembled in 1978 by the folks of the "Camerata". It = features > scaled pipes and "short" but modern standard compatible key = measurements. A > lovely instrument indeed. > > As a mere coincidence I am planning to build one from scratch (for now = as > spare time project and for my personal use :)-- just finishing the draftwork > on my "medieval" drawdesk :) until I find a *user friendly* CAD software > down here in the woods. > > In other context I wish everybody and everyone a happy new year 2004! > > Un gran abrazo a todos [a big hug to all] > Andres >      
(back) Subject: Re: Bulletins From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:25:03 -0600   Dennis Steckley wrote:   >With REAL names like Oliphant Chuckerbutty, who has to make up names! > He did, actually. He was organist of Holy Trinity, Paddington, and assistant organist of Southwark Cathedral, but also played theatre organ under the assumed name of C. Sharpe Minor. And Oliphant Chuckerbutty wasn't even his full name, which was Wilson Oliphant Soorjo Alexander Chuckerbutty. I believe his parents came from Calcutta, which goes some way toward explaining his extraordinary name. Another of my favorite organist names was Alwyn Surplice, one of the former organists of Winchester Cathedral.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:46:19 -0800       bobelms wrote: > Bud I find your post very depressing. If your posts are correct in > detail there has to be something seriously wrong on the church scene > in the USA. There must be something seriously wrong for you to adopt > that attitude of bitterness. >   There is indeed, Bob, and I hasten to add things were NOT this way when I was a young organist.   Three things happened: Vietnam, Vatican II, and the rise of the mega-churches and "Contemporary Christian Music."   In the first instance, a legitimate distrust of the government turned into wholesale iconoclasm on every front. There is a definite dividing line in the clergy: priests who went to seminary BEFORE 1960, and priests who went to seminary AFTER 1960, both Roman and Anglican.   Vatican II might have been Roman, but it spilled over into other churches, particularly the high church Episcopal "anglo-papists" who were inclined to say "God bless you" every time the pope sneezed <G>. It was used as an excuse to demolish architecture, liturgy and music. I have read the conciliar documents in the original Latin. Nothing of the sort is to be found in them. As much as I dislike current Roman conservatism on social issues, they're spot-on in trying to curb the liturgical and musical lawlessness in their churches.   The brutal way the new US Episcopal Book of Common Prayer was imposed from on high represented a startling departure from the "live and let live" historical position of American Anglicanism, which tolerated everything from Solemn High Morning Prayer to Solemn High Mass out of the Anglican Missal. General Convention would have been FAR better off to do what was done elsewhere in Anglicanism, notably in the Church of England: the old Prayer Book remains normative; anything else is provisional and optional.   As it was, it split the American Church; the US Episcopal Church had four million members in the 1960s; that dropped to two million after the imposition of the new Prayer Book. Granted, there were other issues, but I have YET to meet a rank-and-file Episcopalian who LIKES the new book, IF they're old enough to have known the other. The generation that has grown up SINCE 1982, of course, doesn't know the difference, sadly.   The rise of CCM has its roots in the Roman "folk Mass," but it has gone FAR beyond that ... theologically deficient texts coupled with the banal music of ... what? ... the cocktail lounge? the discotheque? the rave scene? the street rapper with his boom-box?   Several people have noted that it's NOT the Gen-Xers or younger who want CCM ... it's the yuppy PARENTS, evidently trying to recapture their lost youth. The YOUNG PEOPLE'S response is "get REAL! that stuff is SO tired .... last year's tunes!"   Making a living as a church musician was a precarious business BEFORE all this; NOW it's damn near IMPOSSIBLE.   Yes, I know, you and I have HAD the discussion about avocational as opposed to professional church musicians. For most of my life I had to work 2-3 jobs (bookkeeper, truck driver [!], typesetter, janitor, salesman) to SUBSIDIZE my "full-time" participation in church music, writing my music on the bus to and from other jobs, late at night, and on weekends.   I never wanted to BE anything BUT a parish organist in a medium-sized church ... I had no dreams of a cathedral post. All I wanted was a comfortable living and a peaceful working environment. Aside from my home parish in high school and Old St. Mary's, I never had it. I left home to go "up north" to conservatory; Old St. Mary's program was demolished by the archdiocesan "liturgy police" after Msgr. died.   St. Matthew's was a WONDERFUL place, and I would have stayed there till I died, had it not been for the rector-from-hell.   Oh well, I'm out of it now, and thankfully so.   Cheers,   Bud