PipeChat Digest #3438 - Friday, February 7, 2003
 
Fritts Organ at Vassar recital - more
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Marie-Claire Alain on Video
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
M. Gallagher's Program - Fritts at Vassar College
  by <patmai@juno.com>
Sigh
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Sigh
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Sigh
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Sigh
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Fritts Organ at Vassar recital - more From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 13:47:10 -0800   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1167468065=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" ; format=3D"flowed" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hi people..   Tomorrow saturday will be the first public recital on the new Fritts organ in Skinner Recital Hall here at Vassar College. time 8 PM.   John V   Sorry... should have added that Merellyn Gallagher - the Vassar Organist - will be performing music by Bach and others. please check the Vassar website for details, directions , etc. http://www.frittsorgan.com/organs/vassar/. Hope to see some of you there!   press release copy follows:   Vassar opens Fritts Organ dedicatory recital series, February 8   In the fall of 2002, a magnificent new Baroque-style tracker organ was installed in the Vassar College Music Department's recital hall in the Belle Skinner Music Building. Built by internationally known organ builder Paul Fritts of Tacoma, Washington, this instrument -- with two manuals and pedal, 34 stops, and including features of north and middle German baroque styles -- has already attracted the attention of organists throughout the country. Three recitalists will offer the formal inaugural of this instrument. The opening concert on Saturday, February 8, at 8 p.m., features Vassar organist Merellyn Gallagher performing works by Bach, Scheidt, Couperin, Kauffmann, and Mendelssohn. Gallagher, college organist and lecturer, was organist and choir director at Grace Church in Millbrook, New York, for many years. Her teachers have included Vernon Gotwals, Helmut Walcha, and Heinrich Fleischer. A graduate of Smith College, with a master's degree from the University of Minnesota, Gallagher was on the faculty for Pipe Organ Encounters 1990 at Duquesnes University. On Saturday, February 22, at 8 p.m., James David Christie will perform works by Sweelinck, Scheidt, Scheidemann, Buxtehude, B=3DF6hm, and Bach. Christie received his degrees from Oberlin and New England conservatories, winning the latter's Distinguished Alumni Award. His teachers have included David Boe, Yuko Hayahsi, Marie-Claire Alain, Bernard Lagac=3DE9, and Harold Vogel. In 1979, he was the first American to win the first prize in the International Organ Competition in Bruges, Belgium. He has served as organist for the Boston Symphony since 1978. In 2000, he was visiting professor at the Paris conservatory and the Academy of Music, Krakow, Poland. He was recently been appointed to the faculty of Oberlin College. On Saturday, March 29, at 8 p.m. Joan Lippincott will perform works by Bach, Mozart, and Mendelssohn. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and Westminster Choir College, Lippincott was recently principal university organist at Princeton University, and for many years served as professor of organ at Westminster Choir College. Her many recordings on the Gothic label include music by Bach, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Widor, Alain, and Pinkham. In 2001-2002, she played eight all-Bach programs on different organs in New York City under the rubric "Bach in the Big Apple." At the final celebratory event, on Saturday, May 10, at 8 p.m., the hall will be renamed the Mary Anna Fox Martel Recital Hall in memory of Martel who graduated in 1890 with a diploma from Vassar's School of Music. This program will include organ music among other performances by students and faculty. A Martel Foundation grant acquired by Vassar College President =3D46rances Fergusson funded the renovation of the stage area and the air-conditioning of the recital hall. =3D46or more information, call the Vassar College Department of Music at (845) 437-7294. Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Cathy Jennings, Office of Campus Activities, (845) 437-5370, as far in advance as possible to request reasonable and appropriate accommodations for the event. Specifications for this organ can be reviewed on the Internet at http://www.frittsorgan.com/organs/vassar/. Vassar College is a highly selective, coeducational, independent, residential liberal arts college founded in 1861.       124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 || 845.437.7000 || Contact || =3DA9 Vassar College   John V --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1167468065=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <html><head><style type=3D3D"text/css"><!-- blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 } --></style><title>Fritts Organ at Vassar recital - more</title></head><body> <div>Hi people..<br> <br> Tomorrow saturday will be the first public recital on the new Fritts organ in Skinner Recital Hall here at Vassar College.<br> time 8 PM.<br> </div> <div>John V</div> <div><br></div> <div>Sorry... should have added that Merellyn Gallagher - the Vassar Organist&nbsp; - will be performing music by Bach and others.&nbsp; please check the Vassar website for details, directions , etc. http://www.frittsorgan.com/organs/vassar/. Hope to see some of you there!</div> <div><br></div> <div>press release copy follows:</div> <div><br></div> <div>Vassar opens Fritts Organ dedicatory recital series, February 8<tt><br> <br> </tt>In the fall of 2002, a magnificent new Baroque-style tracker organ was installed in the Vassar College Music Department's recital hall in the Belle Skinner Music Building. Built by internationally known organ builder Paul Fritts of Tacoma, Washington, this instrument -- with two manuals and pedal, 34 stops, and including features of north and middle German baroque styles -- has already attracted the attention of organists throughout the country.<br> Three recitalists will offer the formal inaugural of this instrument.<br> The opening concert on Saturday, February 8, at 8 p.m., features Vassar organist Merellyn Gallagher performing works by Bach, Scheidt, Couperin, Kauffmann, and Mendelssohn. Gallagher, college organist and lecturer, was organist and choir director at Grace Church in Millbrook, New York, for many years. Her teachers have included Vernon Gotwals, Helmut Walcha, and Heinrich Fleischer. A graduate of Smith College, with a master's degree from the University of Minnesota, Gallagher was on the faculty for Pipe Organ Encounters 1990 at Duquesnes University.<br> On Saturday, February 22, at 8 p.m., James David Christie will perform works by Sweelinck, Scheidt, Scheidemann, Buxtehude, B=3DF6hm, and Bach. Christie received his degrees from Oberlin and New England conservatories, winning the latter's Distinguished Alumni Award. His teachers have included David Boe, Yuko Hayahsi, Marie-Claire Alain, Bernard Lagac=3DE9, and Harold Vogel. In 1979, he was the first American to win the first prize in the International Organ Competition in Bruges, Belgium. He has served as organist for the Boston Symphony since 1978. In 2000, he was visiting professor at the Paris conservatory and the Academy of Music, Krakow, Poland. He was recently been appointed to the faculty of Oberlin College.<br> On Saturday, March 29, at 8 p.m. Joan Lippincott will perform works by Bach, Mozart, and Mendelssohn. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and Westminster Choir College, Lippincott was recently principal university organist at Princeton University, and for many years served as professor of organ at Westminster Choir College. Her many recordings on the Gothic label include music by Bach, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Widor, Alain, and Pinkham. In 2001-2002, she played eight all-Bach programs on different organs in New York City under the rubric &quot;Bach in the Big Apple.&quot;<br> At the final celebratory event, on Saturday, May 10, at 8 p.m., the hall will be renamed the Mary Anna Fox Martel Recital Hall in memory of Martel who graduated in 1890 with a diploma from Vassar's School of Music. This program will include organ music among other performances by students and faculty.<br> A Martel Foundation grant acquired by Vassar College President Frances =3D46ergusson funded the renovation of the stage area and the air-conditioning of the recital hall.</div> <div>For more information, call the Vassar College Department of Music at (845) 437-7294. Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Cathy Jennings, Office of Campus Activities, (845) 437-5370, as far in advance as possible to request reasonable and appropriate accommodations for the event. Specifications for this organ can be reviewed on the Internet at http://www.frittsorgan.com/organs/vassar/.<br> Vassar College is a highly selective, coeducational, independent, residential liberal arts college founded in 1861.<br> <tt><br> </tt><br> <br> 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 || 845.437.7000 || Contact || =3DA9 Vassar College</div> <div><br></div> <div>John V</div> </body> </html> --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1167468065=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D--  
(back) Subject: Marie-Claire Alain on Video From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 14:28:31 -0500   A new video production made during Marie-Claire Alain's 40th tour of the = U. S. during February and March, 2002, is now available on DVD or on VHS videotape. The program features her lectures and masterclasses given in = New York City and at Bales Organ Recital Hall of the University of Kansas. Further description appears at http://www.ohscatalog.org on the opening page.   Bill Van Pelt      
(back) Subject: M. Gallagher's Program - Fritts at Vassar College From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 14:59:25 -0500   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ----__JNP_000_0b26.60f7.2fff Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings on a very snowy day in the Northeast...   Thanks to John Vanderlee for posting info about the new Fritts at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, part of the Central Hudson Valley.   Organ soloist and Professor Merellyn Gallagher is a member of our Central Hudson Valley Chapter. She will play Bach's Vivaldi Concerto in a minor Prelude and Fugue in C Major (9/8), and the Passacaglia & Fugue in c minor   as well as works of Bruhns, Scheidt, Kauffmann.   Mendelssohn's D major Variations are also on the program.   For further info, please see the website For further info. http://www.frittsorgan.com/organs/vassar/   Hope to see John and other Pipechatters there!   Pat Maimone Post Chapel III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller/Gress-Miles patmai@juno.com yp6867@exmail.usma.army.mil ----__JNP_000_0b26.60f7.2fff Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3Dcontent-type = content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Dus-ascii> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bottomMargin=3D3D0 leftMargin=3D3D3 topMargin=3D3D0 = rightMargin=3D3D3> <DIV>Greetings on a very snowy day in the Northeast...</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Thanks to John Vanderlee for =3D posting=3D20 info about the new Fritts at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, part of the =3D Central=3D20 Hudson Valley.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Organ soloist and = Professor=3D =3D20 Merellyn Gallagher is a member of our<BR>Central Hudson Valley = Chapter.&=3D nbsp;=3D20 She will play Bach's&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;Vivaldi Concerto in a minor&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;Prelude and Fugue in C Major (9/8), and the <BR>&nbsp;=3D Passacaglia=3D20 &amp; Fugue in c minor</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;as well as works of Bruhns, </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&=3D=   nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&=3D=   nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D20 Scheidt,&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&=3D=   nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&=3D=   nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D2= 0 &nbsp;Kauffmann. </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Mendelssohn's D major Variations are also on the program.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; For further info, = =3D please=3D20 see the website For further info.</DIV> <DIV><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.frittsorgan.com/organs/vassar/">http://www.frittsorgan= .=3D com/organs/vassar/</A></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Hope to see John and = =3D other=3D20 Pipechatters there!</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Pat=3D20 Maimone<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Post Chapel = III=3D /57=3D20 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller/Gress-Miles<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= =3D &nbsp;&nbsp;=3D20 <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:patmai@juno.com">patmai@juno.com</A><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= &=3D nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D20 <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:yp6867@exmail.usma.army.mil">yp6867@exmail.usma.army.mil</= A>=3D </DIV></BODY></HTML>   ----__JNP_000_0b26.60f7.2fff--     ________________________________________________________________ Sign Up for Juno Platinum Internet Access Today Only $9.95 per month! Visit www.juno.com  
(back) Subject: Sigh From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 15:25:16 -0500   (I apologize for cross-posting this in PIPORG-L a minute ago. The list owners there will probably slap me for writing off-topic, and rightly so. But it is not entirely so, because I think that we are often too hard on ourselves because of how we are treated in the big world. This fate is nothing personal, nor any localized disease, as the situation below should vividly demonstrate.)   The annual book sale of our university library this year included = thousands of LP recordings that had been donated, especially by two elderly = gentlemen. They had built these collections during most of their adult lives. One ranged comprehensively over the whole field of classical music, with all = the greatest composers represented by their greatest works, and sometimes multiple interpretations. The other collection specialized in opera and acquired works well off the beaten path. Both took care of their records and left them to us in good, almost mint, condition.   As Music Librarian, I know that many of these belong in our collection, as the donors hoped, but we do not have and will not in the future have the space to house more than a select minority. So we are selling them (together with the usual large room full of books), in a sale put together and staffed by library employees and volunteers.   All week these books and recordings have been available for "a steal", the recordings going for 50 cents per album (that means, perhaps, a whole = opera for 50 cents). Quite a few, indeed have found new homes, but not more = than 1/3 of the whole. Today the prices have gone down to $1 per bag: we're = all but giving them away. And there are still box after box of classics that are not available on CD. My house is already stuffed full of books, = music, and records. Whenever I've something in this sale that friends might = like, I've grabbed it for them. I've probably exceeded the bounds of sanity already. There is nothing more that I can do.   This is is a university campus. Thousands of the country's supposedly brightest young people live here, including several hundred majors in a reputable school of music. The surrounding area is one of the most affluent in the U.S.   The fact that, under these circumstances, so much beauty is liable to go into the dumpster out of sheer indifference-- the stuff is here for the asking-- is very disheartening, disturbing, and mystifying. Only a generation ago, millions (or at least hundreds of thousands) of people = paid good money for the privilege of enjoying this music at home whenever they wished. As a student, I couldn't afford a large collection, but that made me all the more inveterate a bargain-hunter. I once risked flunking a course because I *had* to go to a nearby book sale. But now, in the = middle of a whole town of the like, we can't even GIVE them away.   It would be understandable if most of this repertoire and performances = were available in some other format, but most of it is not. When it's gone we can't expect it to return. People don't realize this or care-- even some = of our music faculty don't seem to be aware of the sad state of the CD market for serious music.   What has happened to people's agendas since I was a student? Readers in Britain, Germany, France, South America-- tell me, would this happen in = your country?              
(back) Subject: Re: Sigh From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 07 Feb 2003 15:43:25 -0500   Paul,   Not everybody overlooks these treasures on LP records, - I haunt the local =   March of Dimes store, and the Goodwill store, often finding remarkable albums at 50 cents each, - in fact, I am playing a recent acquisition as I =   write!   I suspect that you are too far away for me to partake of your LP sale, - = by the way, where are you?   You could offer the LPs to your local Goodwill store, - they will eventually sell them, - it just takes time for it to happen!   Best wishes,   Bob Conway Kingston, Ontario, Canada.     At 03:25 PM 2/7/03 -0500, you wrote: >(I apologize for cross-posting this in PIPORG-L a minute ago. The list >owners there will probably slap me for writing off-topic, and rightly so. >But it is not entirely so, because I think that we are often too hard on >ourselves because of how we are treated in the big world. This fate is >nothing personal, nor any localized disease, as the situation below = should >vividly demonstrate.) > >The annual book sale of our university library this year included = thousands >of LP recordings that had been donated, especially by two elderly = gentlemen. >They had built these collections during most of their adult lives. One >ranged comprehensively over the whole field of classical music, with all = the >greatest composers represented by their greatest works, and sometimes >multiple interpretations. The other collection specialized in opera and >acquired works well off the beaten path. Both took care of their records >and left them to us in good, almost mint, condition. > >As Music Librarian, I know that many of these belong in our collection, = as >the donors hoped, but we do not have and will not in the future have the >space to house more than a select minority. So we are selling them >(together with the usual large room full of books), in a sale put = together >and staffed by library employees and volunteers. > >All week these books and recordings have been available for "a steal", = the >recordings going for 50 cents per album (that means, perhaps, a whole = opera >for 50 cents). Quite a few, indeed have found new homes, but not more = than >1/3 of the whole. Today the prices have gone down to $1 per bag: we're = all >but giving them away. And there are still box after box of classics that >are not available on CD. My house is already stuffed full of books, = music, >and records. Whenever I've something in this sale that friends might = like, >I've grabbed it for them. I've probably exceeded the bounds of sanity >already. There is nothing more that I can do. > >This is is a university campus. Thousands of the country's supposedly >brightest young people live here, including several hundred majors in a >reputable school of music. The surrounding area is one of the most >affluent in the U.S. > >The fact that, under these circumstances, so much beauty is liable to go >into the dumpster out of sheer indifference-- the stuff is here for the >asking-- is very disheartening, disturbing, and mystifying. Only a >generation ago, millions (or at least hundreds of thousands) of people = paid >good money for the privilege of enjoying this music at home whenever they >wished. As a student, I couldn't afford a large collection, but that = made >me all the more inveterate a bargain-hunter. I once risked flunking a >course because I *had* to go to a nearby book sale. But now, in the = middle >of a whole town of the like, we can't even GIVE them away. > >It would be understandable if most of this repertoire and performances = were >available in some other format, but most of it is not. When it's gone we >can't expect it to return. People don't realize this or care-- even some = of >our music faculty don't seem to be aware of the sad state of the CD = market >for serious music. > >What has happened to people's agendas since I was a student? Readers in >Britain, Germany, France, South America-- tell me, would this happen in = your >country? > > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Sigh From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 15:47:31 -0800   > >I suspect that you are too far away for me to partake of your LP >sale, - by the way, where are you?   Hi People,   Just a friendly reminder....   I noticed that often in the zeal of finding a good home for something worthwhile, the offerer will describe all in great detail, omitting a location!   I've seen it on all lists with organs, parts, music, etc. Just take a moment to make sure that we all know WHERE it is when something becomes available.   Keep those offers coming!!   And BTW Goodwill is an excellent source for rare recordings! I use quite a few on my radio show; "Pipes 'n Pizzazz" WVKR 91.3FM Vassar college Radio Poughkeepsie, NY , mondays 11 - 12 noon.   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: Sigh From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 11:26:10 +1300   Most sadly, Paul, it does happen here in NZ as well. The university here = in Wellington turfed out its lp's some years ago, and I know that most, if = not all, of the main public libraries have done the same, inclkuding = Wellington recently, with records going at the same price as your lot.   It hurts a great deal, as it shows me just how little people really care about wonderful music on wonderful recordings. Not so long ago, I picked = up a heap of brand-new German-pressing DGG boxes of records of all the symphonies of Mozart, Beethoven, Bruckner, Brahms, Schubert, Tchaikovsky, Sibelius, Mahler, etc.etc. Sure the lp's were about seven years old, but = had never been played once, and at a $1 a box? Outrageous.   My trouble is that I find it almost a moral issue to grab as much of this stuff as possible, to preserve it for the next generation, so I have = almost 13,000 lp's now.   In my view, both our libraries and your university one are guilty of as = much heinous sin and vandalism as those who burn books. We have no rights, as I see it, to destroy recorded heritage any more than we have to destroy architectural heritage, yet I see virtually no musicians protesting. Just imagine, for example, what it would be like if we were to have some recordings Bach made on various organs at various stages of his career!   Clearly, it seems to me, the recording companies don't care, as they are only out to sell new stuff. And yet there does seem to be a lot of old = vinyl stuff re-issued on CD. Some time ago, for example, there was a bit of a = fad for putting old Mercury records onto CD - and having some of those old Mercury pressings, I know why. Amongst my favourite recordings are the old ones of Beecham conducting the Salomon Symphonies of Hayden - luscious!   If I was in your country, I'd bring a truck and haul all those lp's here, for safe storage till they could be appreciated as the national treasure they undoubtedly are.   Needless to say, I have some 2500 78s as well, with some glorious music on them, though admitting the quality isn't a patch on lp. If I were 40 years younger, I'd transfer 78s to CD and enjoy doing it: I recently got a 4-lp set of that wonderful Australian bass Malcolm McEachern, being all the 78s he made in the 1930s. An absolute treasure of a glorious voice, to me.   I fear I'm rambling and boring people, but I'm passionate about this, = hating the ignorance and vandalism that is being shown.   There is something tragically wrong with an educational system that does = not allow for the preservation of books and records, and does not encourage, urge, young people to preserve, appreciate and enjoy the heritage it has.   Ross   >The annual book sale of our university library this year included = thousands >of LP recordings that had been donated,