PipeChat Digest #3445 - Monday, February 10, 2003
 
RE: Archival copying to a CD
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
UPRORIUS FELIXUS LYBUNTIENSIS
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
found the information about the LA Cathedral Keyboards
  by "Ray Kimber" <ray@kimber.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3444 - 02/10/03
  by <PipeO52@aol.com>
Re: found the information about the LA Cathedral Keyboards
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3444 - 02/10/03
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Blackburn Cathedral (Part 2)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Blackburn Cathedral (Part 3)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Felix Hell a  LYBUNT?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Bach's B minor
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Blackburn Cathedral (Part 3) (CORRECTED VERSION)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Bach's B minor
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Archival copying to a CD From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 17:11:33 -0500   > take a bad CDR and scratch the foil with something sharp. I mean really go at it!!   Before you do that, try attaching a piece of Scotch tape to the top of the disc, leaving an end hanging over the edge; then grab that edge and remove the tape. You just might take part of the CD foil off with it. I don't think that making something so flimsy and then promoting it as a durable medium is very nice, but large companies purveying mass-produced products with few competitors can abandon all pretense.   Happened to me once accidentally, with the CD ROM accompanying a computer component that I had bought fortunately from a local retailer. The CD was attached to the wrapping in just that way, and was ruined simply by my taking the tape off. No way was it my fault, but I had to threaten to return the whole product before they sent me a replacement CD.    
(back) Subject: UPRORIUS FELIXUS LYBUNTIENSIS From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 17:31:38 EST   Somehow I think we are getting incomplete information from different sources. More importantly, this has once again turned into a hateful bashing of =   academic achievement and the earning of advanced degrees, which have = nothing to do with the topic at hand. Mistrust of intellect should not rear its = head every time we perceive an injustice. One purpose of the Guild is to be inspired by our colleagues. Fundraising is a staggeringly touchy subject. It must be handled very sensitively or even the most well-intentioned requests for philanthropy = can be misinterpreted. Writing a form letter that is hoped to cover all = potential donors and circumstances is a nearly impossible task, and anybody charged with that responsibility does so with trepidation. No development sector = of an organization wishes to alienate, although it happens very often, and sometimes disastrously. If somebody cannot afford to donate, they may simply want to state = that current circumstances do not permit it. The organization will understand. = A previous donor may have already committed their charitable giving for the year, whether to medical, social, or other arts causes. They may be the = first in their family history to ever send a child to college, which is proving = to be a financial challenge. Every last penny may be going to the care of a dying parent, partner, or spouse. The term "lybunt," by its very nature, is based upon a previously established gift or pattern of giving. Established donors usually WANT to continue giving if they can afford it, unless they have been insulted by = the organization at hand. There is nothing worse than being told that one's = gift is insufficient, or when an organization smells a windfall or inheritance, = or when one's pledged gift is cripplingly restructured by the organization without consultation. The separate subject of AGO dues was also raised, as professional dues =   tend to add up as one joins more professional circles, and many organists tend to be underpaid. As a more affordable alternative to full AGO members hip, one can subscribe to The American Organist for $48 annually, and keep = up with liturgical and musical trends (zowie), scholarship (grrrrr...), new music (uh-oh), performance practices (ugh), new instruments (oooh), new artists (even teenagers), and the achievements of one's colleagues, which might inspire admiration and hope, rather than resentment. Full membership =   may open more doors, yet for the cost of two or three CDs, one can still = keep in touch with the field.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: found the information about the LA Cathedral Keyboards From: "Ray Kimber" <ray@kimber.com> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 15:38:18 -0700   Hello List,   I phoned Dobson and found that the keyboards are P & S. Thank you for = those who responded, the suggestion was perfect. (And so obvious that I really should have done that in the first place)   Kind regards,   Ray    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3444 - 02/10/03 From: <PipeO52@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 17:35:32 EST     --part1_1a3.109e0157.2b798334_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Regarding the comments made by RonSeverin@aol.com:   I couldn't have said it any better myself, Ron. From reading the letter = of Mr. Obetz, No doubt that had he lived today, J.S. Bach himself would = receive a similar letter.   I am waiting to read Mr. Obetz's response.   Art PipeO52 @aol.com         --part1_1a3.109e0157.2b798334_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000080" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Regarding the comments made = by RonS=3D everin@aol.com:&nbsp; <BR> <BR> I couldn't have said it any better myself, Ron.&nbsp; From reading the = lette=3D r of Mr. Obetz, No doubt that had he lived today, J.S. Bach himself would = re=3D ceive a similar letter.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> I am waiting to read Mr. Obetz's response. <BR> <BR> Art<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000ff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"0"><B><I>PipeO</FONT><FONT COL=3D OR=3D3D"#ff0000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSE=3D RIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">52 </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = style=3D3D"B=3D ACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"></B></I>@aol.com<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000080" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_1a3.109e0157.2b798334_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: found the information about the LA Cathedral Keyboards From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 17:57:06 -0500   At 03:38 PM 2/10/2003 -0700, you wrote: >Hello List, > >I phoned Dobson and found that the keyboards are P & S. Thank you for = those >who responded, the suggestion was perfect. (And so obvious that I really >should have done that in the first place) > >Kind regards, > >Ray   Ray,   We here at Classic Organ Works, have added optical switches to a number of =   P & S keyboards. The workmanship is absolutely great, and they have a wonderful feel to them. However they have one problem, and this afflicts = a number of products that come from England. The problem is, the dryness here, especially in winter, with central heating, causes minor warping and =   sticking, and sometimes the odd squeaking. Every set of keyboards we got from them had this problem after they were in our shop for a couple of = weeks.   Arie V.   P.S. They are hugely expensive too, probably in the same ballpark as the Harris keyboards. They are about the same quality too, in fact the Harris =   keyboards don't have this problem. I have also worked on Laukhauff keyboards (these were made in the 1980s), and they were lovely keys to look at (reverse colour, tracker touch, the whole 9 yards), but they frequently had sticking notes, scrapping noises etc., but generally only when the humidity changed quite a bit. If only this were a perfect world.................      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3444 - 02/10/03 From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 18:11:13 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3127745473_361291 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   On 2/10/03 5:35 PM, "PipeO52@aol.com" <PipeO52@aol.com> wrote:   > I am waiting to read Mr. Obetz's response. > > You may want to prepare a thermos of coffee. Or something.   Alan   --B_3127745473_361291 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: PipeChat Digest #3444 - 02/10/03</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 2/10/03 5:35 PM, = &quot;PipeO52@aol.com&quot=3D ; &lt;PipeO52@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000080"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">I am = waiting to=3D read Mr. Obetz's response. <BR> <BR> </FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000080"><FONT = FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> </FONT></FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">You may want to prepare a = thermo=3D s of coffee. &nbsp;Or something.<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3127745473_361291--    
(back) Subject: Blackburn Cathedral (Part 2) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 00:02:26 +0000 (GMT)   Part Two     I don't know if anyone else shares this, but there are moments in time when I am overwhelmed by my own ignorance. As Carlo Curley, still using the 1969 Walker (UK) pipework began to play the excellent "How brightly shines the Morning Star" by Buxtehude, I became acutely aware of the fact that I had never seen or heard it, let alone performed it. Suiting the light and bright sound of the Walker (UK) stops, I still wouldn't contemplate a 400 mile walk to hear it, but it was as good a Buxtehude as I have ever heard. (I DID once drive 200 miles to hear part of "L'orgue Mystique" - the Pentecost Cycle - by Tournemire)   Most very young children carry to bed small soft toys such as friendly Gorillas, cloth Crocodiles and cuddly Bears. Innocent perhaps, until the dreams and nightmares begin, and your furry friends become the monsters under the bed, ready to bite your right leg off in the morning. As my fear of soft toys subsided, I would put organ music on my little record player rather than Lullabies....usually Albert Schweitzer. Three bars of the "Great" G Minor by Bach, and I was in a deep coma!   There was one exception to this, which was his thoughtful, halting and deeply moving rendition of "O mensch, bewein' dein' sunde gross" by J S Bach. It was the only track on the record which could keep me awake for more than ten seconds, and by far the slowest. In fact, it was such a deep performance, that I would often have tears in my eyes listening to it.   When Mr Curley launched into the same Chorale Prelude, I was transported........by Easy Jet and a fast motor coach, for a quick whistle stop tour of the Holy Land, a brisk canter up Calvary with a packed lunch, and back home before Dinner. Quite clearly, Mr Curley and myself were at opposite extremes of the artistic rubicon, with little chance of reconciliation.   The problem I have in playing the music critic, is one of sheer respect for what Carlo Curley does and the fact that I enjoy his company enormously. He also happens to be one of the few truly professional recitalists in the world, with a prodigious technique. I would blame no-one for calling me presumptious and even above my station, for I have but a fraction (hopefully a sizeable fraction) of his technique and musical ability.   That said.....to hell with it! Publish and be dammned!   Of all the things which tend to kindle hostility in the UK, it is Mr Curley's Bach performances. It has absolutely nothing to do with getting the notes right.....he does that with sickening regularity. No, it is something else, which I would liken to the firebrand Evangelist's approach to the good book. Imagine, if you will, the whispered angst and tear-stained face which, in an instant, becomes the raging bull and the booming voice. Then apply this to something like I.John I. "In the beginning was the word".   The words have a natural rhythm all of their own which, if read just as they are, dictate the pace, the tenor and the meaning without need for further elaboration or undue emphasis......the eloquence of understatement!   The Bach Prelude and Fugue in B-minor (BWV544) is one which does not call for great technique, but it absolutely demands understanding. Moreover, it is a work which many organists, myself included, have played in concert and on many Sunday mornings.....we all know it. (Some better than others, I might add)   I feel sure that my own understanding of Bach is based on a certain pan-European understanding, in which the music is allowed to speak for itself, just as it is, and in the manner dictated by the notes. Perhaps the greatest training available is not a tutor beating the scholar with a stick, but the humble Harpsichord, which lacks expression of any kind. (OK....forget the "romantische" versions!) I happen to play a severely Baroque instrument, which is also the finest master I have ever had.....I feel that I am closer to what Bach knew best.   I know for a fact, that any notion of "Bach the Romantic" only reveals itself when the details of phrasing and articulation are consistent, and the mathematical symmetry and precision are respected throughout.....including minimal registration changes.....the eloquence of understatement.   Thus, the moment that Mr Curley started the Fugue of the B-minor in a legato manner, I knew we were in for a highly stylised and over-romanticised performance. How else could the drama be unlocked but by the addition of ever louder registration?   In my humble opinion, sudden changes of dynamic are a distraction in Bach; particulalry where passages on a contrasting manual differ markedly from first to last as more stops are drawn. I feel that, exactly the same sense of high drama could have been achieved, with the addition of not more than three or four stops throughout the Fugue. Instead, we got the full gamut, from 8 & 4ft right through to full organ less Imperial Trumpet!   But lest I be seen as too critical or hostile, perhaps I should suggest that Mr Curley is the natural successor to the lineage which includes Stokowski and Virgil Fox. Oddly enough, his enthusiastic followers have long forgiven Mr Curley for his larger than life Bach.....just as I have. Indeed, we have come to expect it as part of the entertainment!   (To be continued....)     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK                                   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Blackburn Cathedral (Part 3) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 00:56:24 +0000 (GMT)   Part 3   Cont'd (would you believe) from Part 2     Having dwelt on Mr Curley's Bach, and the failure of the Walker(USA), digital additions to the Blackburn organ, it might be expedient to despatch the remaining 3 items of the the first half of the concert as quickly as possible.   Apart from the total re-building of the Blackburn masterpiece, carried out by a provincial organ-builder, David Wood of Huddersfield, money was also set aside for the manufacture (rather than the building of) a Positive Organ on natty little wheels. The next item featured this little Positive organ, made by the respected organ-builder Kenneth Tickell. In the "Duet" froAntonioAntionio Soler's 3rd Concerto, the distant pipes of the Cathedral main organ entered into dialogue with the Positive Organ placed next to the main console.....the latter on rather larger wheels! The duet was impressive in so much as the co-ordination between the Cathedral Organist, RichPositiveer (Posotive Organ) and Carlo Curley (Main Organ) was a model of precision.....sheer delight!   If the new, non-functional digital "wood basses" were going to be missed, then it would be in Barber's eloquent and moving "Adagio", transcribed by Strickland.   Did I sense a certain empathy? I think so!   The "crowd" were hushed as that lovely music washed around the cathedral; perhaps bringing to mind our shared transatlantic fears and the awfulness of 9-11. It seemed an appropriate inclusion in a programme performed by a much loved American organist.....a musical "group hug" which we all need at the moment.   Before the end of the first half, we learned that the Walker (USA) digital voices had suffered a "spike" in the mains voltage. (Some suggested that a "pike" might have been more appropriate!) There was, it seemed, a good chance that air would be moved, and chests massaged by the rumble of "Open Woods" before the end of the concert.   Wagner has never interested me in the slightest, and I am the first to talk "happy couples" out of "Lohengrin" if given half a chance. The only time I ever heard "Tannhauser" was in an opera house, which had such an effect on me, that I awoke painfully as people trampled all over my feet when the interval commenced! "Entry of the nobles or not", I had the best seat in the house, and I was stayin' remember I don't remmeber much about Mr Curley's "entry", other than the fact that it made a hell of a din and featured everything which happened to work, including the Imperial Trumpet and the splendid 32ft Serpent.   The split second that the last chord became distant thunder, Mark and myself were off like jack rabbits, hopping across chairs, sliding down the stair-rail into the crypt below; almost crashing into the table on which the glasses of expensive wine were waiting to be consumed.   I don't know what it is about English wine tastes, but Calvary sprang to mind again as we both shuddered after the first mouthful! If this was God's house, there was definitely a case for turning wine into water! Nevertheless, stoicism prevailed, and we downed six glasses between us, wobbled back upstairs and had a friendly chat with the maestro.   A bell, a cymbelstern, or something....who cared....summoned us to our seats once more. Apologising to the Cathedral Organist when I almost sat on his lap, we regained our tentative equilibrium and attempted to focus on the programme notes once again.   Then came a breakthrough!   It seemed that transatlantic harmony was restorwhats-itshe "spiked" digital whatsits had been "de-spiked". Thus, Walker (USA) and Walker (UK) became, truly, Walker International Inc.   We were to be treated to ever greater sonic booms in the spirit of Concorde......time to get out the cotton wool and fasten our seat-belts. The Carlo Curley experience was about to "take off".   (To be concluded.....)     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Felix Hell a LYBUNT? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 01:10:21 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I don't know what all this LYBUNT fuss is about, but I bet there's hell to pay!   Of course, in the UK, we have never heard of Felix.   He may be brilliant, but I suspect that his Father's sense of humour is, shall we say, undeveloped?   Michael Schumacher is exactly the same!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Bach's B minor From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 20:16:28 -0500   Colin Mitchell writes:   > The Bach Prelude and Fugue in B-minor (BWV544) is one which does not = call for great technique, but it absolutely demands understanding.   Yes, indeed: so I'd like to understand it better.   If I've made this inquiry here before, please pardon the repetition.   Around 1970 I sat in a master class in the organ loft of Alice Millar Chapel, Northwestern University, given by Anton Heiller, who I was conditioned to consider, all told, the greatest living organist in the = world at that time-- although he confessed that he no longer practiced much, and at home in Vienna he was better known as a conductor and composer. I = think I'd still make that claim. His greatness was due less to technical virtuosity than to interpretive depth arising from great understanding and love of the music, including (when appropriate) its sacredness. He was reportedly a devout Catholic churchman; in Europe he, Marie-Claire Alain, and Luigi Tagliavini were known as "la clique Catholique."   On this occasion, Heiller discussed Bach's Prelude and Fugue in B minor in detail. His English was not too clear, I was not in a position to hear = and see very well, and might not have had a score with me, so I could grasp = and recall far too little of his explication. He said that the symbolism and use of themes in the fugue evoke the doctrine of the Atonement: A "God-theme" and a "man-theme" are introduced and at first are always = either separate or appearing with the divine theme above the human. Later, a descending section full of cross-motives represent Jesus's Crucifixion and descent into hell, followed by a powerful rising section in which, for the first time, the man-theme is heard *above* the God-theme, suggesting = Christ rescuing man by carrying him up from the depths on His back.   Those are all the details that I can recall now, and I can't quite work = them out by studying the music (although the falling and rising sections are obvious and powerful). It's a wonderful thesis, and I've never heard anything like it from another source.   Clearly, this is a profound late work of Bach's, when the key of B minor would almost guarantee that he was considering the most somber theological ideas.   If anyone is familiar with such symbolism in this piece and could give further details, I'd be very interested.   Paul    
(back) Subject: Re: Blackburn Cathedral (Part 3) (CORRECTED VERSION) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 01:35:19 +0000 (GMT)   Part 3 > > Cont'd (would you believe) from Part 2 > > > Having dwelt on Mr Curley's Bach, and the failure of > the Walker(USA), digital additions to the Blackburn > organ, it might be expedient to despatch the > remaining > 3 items of the the first half of the concert as > quickly as possible. > > Apart from the total re-building of the Blackburn > masterpiece, carried out by a provincial > organ-builder, David Wood of Huddersfield, money was > also set aside for the manufacture (rather than the > building of) a Posotive Organ on natty little > wheels. > The next item featured this little Posotive organ, > made by the respected organ-builder Kenneth Tickell. > In the "Duet" from Padre Antonio Soler's 3rd > Concerto, > the distant pipes of the Cathedral main organ > entered > into dialogue with the Posotive Organ placed next to > the main console.....the latter on rather larger > wheels! The duet was impressive in so much as the > co-ordination between the Cathedral Organist, > Richard Tanner (Posotive Organ) and Carlo Curley > (Main Organ) was a model of precision...sheer > delight! > > If the new, non-functional digital "wood basses" > were > going to be missed, then it would be in Barber's > eloquent and moving "Adagio", transcribed by > Strickland. > > Did I sense a certain empathy? I think so! > > The "crowd" were hushed as that lovely music washed > around the cathedral; perhaps bringing to mind our > shared transatlantic fears and the awfulness of > 9-11. > It seemed an appropriate inclusion in a programme > performed by a much loved American organist.....a > musical "group hug" which we all need at the moment. > > Before the end of the first half, we learned that > the > Walker (USA) digital voices had suffered a "spike" > in > the mains voltage. (Some suggested that a "pike" > might > have been more appropriate!) There was, it seemed, a > good chance that air would be moved, and chests > massaged by the rumble of "Open Woods" before the > end > of the concert. > > Wagner has never interested me in the slightest, and > I am the first to talk "happy couples" out of > "Lohengrin" if given half a chance. The only time I > ever heard "Tannhauser" was in an opera house, which > had such an effect on me, that I awoke painfully as > people trampled all over my feet when the interval > commenced! "Entry of the nobles or not", I had the > best seat in the house, and I was stayin' put! > I don't remember much about Mr Curley's "entry", > other than the fact that it made a hell of a din and > featured everything which happened to work, > including the Imperial Trumpet and the splendid 32ft > Serpent. > > The split second that the last chord became distant > thunder, Mark and myself were off like jack rabbits, > hopping across chairs, sliding down the stair-rail > into the crypt below; almost crashing into the table > on which the glasses of expensive wine were waiting > to be consumed. > > I don't know what it is about English wine tastes, > but Calvary sprang to mind again as we both shuddered > after the first mouthful! If this was God's house, > there was definitely a case for turning wine into > water! Nevertheless, stoicism prevailed, and we > downed six glasses between us, wobbled back upstairs > and had a friendly chat with the maestro. > > A bell, a cymbelstern, or something....who > cared....summoned us to our seats once more. > Apologising to the Cathedral Organist when I almost > sat on his lap, we regained our tentative > equilibrium and attempted to focus on the programme > notes once again. > > Then came a breakthrough! > > It seemed that transatlantic harmony was > restored as the "spiked" digital whats-its had been > "de-spiked". Thus, Walker (USA) and Walker (UK) > became, truly, Walker International Inc. > > We were to be treated to ever greater sonic booms in > the spirit of Concorde......time to get out the > cotton wool and fasten our seat-belts. The Carlo > Curley experience was about to "take off". > > (To be concluded.....) > > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach's B minor From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 01:48:44 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I think I shall leave this to more erudite list-members!   However, I do know that Schweitzer was forever claiming symbolic gestures in Bach's music.   He referred to the "halting motifs" in "O mensch bewein" as the stumbling of Jesus on the ascent to Calvary....something to which I was hinting in the Blackburn (part 2) report.   My own feeling is....if words and descriptions help us to get closer to musical understanding, so much the better. For my part, I just go ignorantly from the music! ;-)   Instinct is everything!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK @ 1.45am....tired, emotional and going to bed.>     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com