PipeChat Digest #3466 - Saturday, February 15, 2003
 
Re: what kind of chest to use
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: non-Wood Music rack
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
TWO SUGGESTIONS
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
5 manuals, 100+ ranks, limited space???????
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: 5 manuals, 100+ ranks, limited space???????
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: 5 manuals, 100+ ranks, limited space???????
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Number of sound producing entities
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Jewish organists
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Huge Church Organs
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Jewish organists
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Huge Church Organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Jewish organists
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Huge Church Organs
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Bennett Organ at Decatur
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
responses
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Bennett Organ at Decatur
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: what kind of chest to use From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 11:02:35 -0600   > Gary Black wrote: > > HI list, What kind of a chest should be used for a 16' > fagotto, electro-pneumatic or electro-mechanical and why? > Thanks, Gary   The speech of pipework on a particular chest depends on a number of factors. These include the speed of opening and closing of the valve or pallet at the beginning and end of playing the note, the amount of concussion of the wind involved in the note playing, and so on. So far as note repetition is concerned the release it actually more important than the attack.A good chest will give clear pipe speech, prompt note repetition, and so on, while a poor chest will cause gulping, bouncing and other undesirable characteristics.   One choice to be made is between electro-pneumatic and electro-mechanical actions. It is certainly true that electro-mechanical actions have come a long way in recent years from the early ones of the 1920's and 1930's which gave very poor response when played rapidly and where pipe speech was often lost in gulping. The use of diodes has made for better response characteristics (hysteresis) in the magnets, the use of expansion chambers has reduced the shock of concussion, and in some cases (e.g. John Gumpey's "Vertalectric" system) the magnets are mounted at a different angle to overcome the tendency of the wind to be admitted at an angle. Wicks and other companies use balanced valves for the larger valves.   Nevertheless, I believe that simply trying a number of actions will demonstrate to most people that electro-pneumatic chests give superior pipe speech and better note repetition. Furthermore, there seems to me no doubt that from the concussion point of view electro-pneumatic slider chests give better pipe speech than pitman or ventil chests. An exception to this was Pilcher's design of pitman chest, where the valves were mounted on the sides of the chest and communicated with the pipes by means of channeling to the toeboard. This produced a nice expansion chamber, minimizing the effects of concussion and produced a sound comparable to a slider chest. Pipework speaks much better on a Pilcher pitman chest than on a Skinner or Moller one. Pilcher's design of chest was unfortunately rather complicated to make and adjust and has unfortunately fallen out of use. There are also advantages to the Austin Universal chest, where the whole chest acts like a kind of vast expansion chamber and again produces a response comparable to a slider chest.   Even beyond this, however, there is a big advantage in having the diapason chorus on a common channel, helping the individual ranks to cohere and coalesce together, and for this there is nothing to compare with a slider chest. It is interesting that this is something that Walter Holtkamp, Sr., understood well, and in some of his instruments the Great chorus was placed on a electro-pneumatic slider chest, while the rest of the organ was on pitman chests.   Reeds, however, are rather tricky, and their performance on slider chests depends very much on the position of the reed in relation to the pallet box. The reed should be placed above the pallet box, and in organs with three or four reeds on the chest the ones furthest from the pallet box may not perform at all well. Reeds also tend to be particularly finicky on electro-mechanical chests, as are strings to a certain extent. One of the best Rodgers representatives, now retired, was Fred Buch, who operated from Ephrata, Pa. On the Rodgers pipe/electronic instruments he supplied, he used to make his own electro-pneumatic unit chests for the reeds and strings, because he could not bear the sound of these on electro-mechanical action.   It will not be possible to use slider or electro-mechanical chests where higher pressures above five or six inches are involved. This is quite commonly the case with reeds, and so there isn't really much of an alternative to electro-pneumatic unit or pitman chests in these instances.   So my vote would be for electro-pneumatic unit or pitman chests for the reeds, and electro-pneumatic slider chests for the flues.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: non-Wood Music rack From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 12:11:57 EST   For our new four-manual drawknob console for Temple Emanu-El, we built = a walnut frame grooved to accept a sheet of plate glass. Our foreman and general manager, Albert Jensen-Moulton, modified a variety of polished = brass window and door hardware from an architectural conservation supply house = to make adjustable pivot mechanisms for the Art Deco frame. They have elegant =   telescoping tubes with knobs that lock the music rack at any angle, = depending upon the height and sight lines of the organist. I have never seen a plastic music rack that did not cloud over from thousands of micro-scratches over time. Such materials take on the = appearance of old bus windows and greatly detract from the beauty of a console. Go with well-finished wood, meticulous inlay work, or good plate glass =   with polished edges. Having made a couple of carved or fretwork music = racks, I found that the most objectionable drawback was that organists, when = marking with a pencil, punched through their music due to varying degrees of flat support from behind.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: TWO SUGGESTIONS From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 11:36:52 -0600   Folks, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE help us out and do two things when you post:   1. Don't merely hit "reply" and send back an increasingly long message = that has tons and tons of earlier messages. We're now getting "Digests" made = up of only two or three new messages!   2. Turn OFF the HTML! Neither do we need reams and reams of pointless data about the format of your email. If you use AOL, it takes some = special techniques to get rid of it, but it can be done, and I believe we covered = it here recently.   I LOVE PIPE ORGANS--so let's concentrate on the essentials and not get bogged in extra junk!   Thanks so much! ;>)   Dennis Steckley    
(back) Subject: 5 manuals, 100+ ranks, limited space??????? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 13:00:16 EST   What are we missing here? I am wracking my brain to try to figure out at what point the average = (or even larger-than-average) church purchases a pipe organ of over a hundred ranks of pipes and THEN decides that it is inadequate, requiring = artificial augmentation. Inadequate for what liturgy? Inadequate for what organ literature? Inadequate for what choral accompaniment? Inadequate for what transcription? "Running out of space" at 105 or 118 or 127 ranks may be providing a message for those involved in the design, expense, reasoning behind, and future maintenance of, this instrument. Having just seen a recently-built IV/105 with three open 32' stops (no added fake voices) that has been supplanted by a praise band with a drum set, I would humbly recommend that = we all step back a bit and reevaluate our various visions. Yes, we ALL love color stops, variety, and the luxury of nuance. There = is nothing more wonderful than having one's choice of nine different pairs of =   undulating ranks, even though the established organ literature calls for = only ONE -- the Voix Celeste. But the constant, unrelenting American need for = more and more 32' stops is really an outgrowth of the fact that we have = rendered them un-thrilling by making them available in our living rooms and our 15-seat chapels. In closing, I have heard a recent instrument, in a large, resonant = room, which has some digital pedal stops, allegedly the least obtrusive. The = fake 32' and 16' Open Wood comes on with an instant thud, and so obliterates = the organ as to make it offensive. Every time I hear it, I hope that if I sit = in a different location, it will have that "natural" sound, in light of the = fact that it was built by "the best in the business." This ugly device takes = away from the seriousness with which that instrument might be perceived, and is = a noise that is so distracting, that it leaves one with no desire to objectively evaluate the well-voiced pipework. Of course, it is also the fault of the organist who seems to leave it permanently drawn. How large is the endowment fund to take care of this hybrid monster in =   the future?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: 5 manuals, 100+ ranks, limited space??????? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 13:36:04 EST     --part1_1aa.109a4f75.2b7fe294_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Sebastian:   Awe, don't be a spoilsport, we organists need our expensive toys to keep us happy. To be honest, things will settle down eventually. I think it boils down to the deprivation of bass pipes during the late 50's to the early 90's when three manual organs only had a Gedackt 16' in the pedal or a soft Subass five high pitched mixtures to get the pipe count up with chorus work an octave or two too high which was a backlash reaction to so called tubbiness of those Skinners, Moellers, etc. which we decided lately, after trashing a good deal of them, that we actually liked. Bare with us, we are only flawed humanbeings. LOL We like plenty of 16' and 8' tone for those romantic works, and slush for those tender moments, lots of solo and chorus reeds for those big moments, and floor shaking 32' s when we feel partuclarly in a decadent mood, and swell shades when we really have lost our minds. Let the Sun shine in! Opps is that a pop song?   Ron Severin ROTFLMAO   Ron Severin   --part1_1aa.109a4f75.2b7fe294_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Sebastian:<BR> <BR> Awe, don't be a spoilsport, we organists need our expensive<BR> toys to keep us happy. To be honest, things will settle down<BR> eventually. I think it boils down to the deprivation of bass<BR> pipes during the late 50's to the early 90's when three manual<BR> organs only had a Gedackt 16' in the pedal or a soft Subass<BR> five high pitched mixtures to get the pipe count up with<BR> chorus work an octave or two too high which was a backlash <BR> reaction to so called tubbiness of those Skinners, Moellers,<BR> etc. which we decided lately, after trashing a good deal of them,<BR> that we actually liked. Bare with us, we are only flawed humanbeings.<BR> LOL We like plenty of 16' and 8' tone for those romantic works,<BR> and slush for those tender moments, lots of solo and chorus reeds<BR> for those big moments, and floor shaking 32' s when we feel <BR> partuclarly in a decadent mood, and swell shades when we really<BR> have lost our minds. Let the Sun shine in! Opps is that a pop song?<BR> <BR> Ron Severin<BR> ROTFLMAO<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1aa.109a4f75.2b7fe294_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: 5 manuals, 100+ ranks, limited space??????? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 13:39:56 EST     --part1_15.a314fff.2b7fe37c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/15/2003 12:01:15 PM Central Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > But the constant, unrelenting American need for more > and more 32' stops is really an outgrowth of the fact that we have = rendered > them un-thrilling by making them available in our living rooms and our > 15-seat chapels. >   Amen! greg   --part1_15.a314fff.2b7fe37c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 2/15/2=3D 003 12:01:15 PM Central Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">But the constant, = unrelenti=3D ng American need for more=3D20 <BR>and more 32' stops is really an outgrowth of the fact that we have = rende=3D red=3D20 <BR>them un-thrilling by making them available in our living rooms and = our=3D20 <BR>15-seat chapels. <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Amen! <BR>greg</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15.a314fff.2b7fe37c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Number of sound producing entities From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 20:59:14 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Sebastien is right of course....digital replication or even simulated digital voices can never be the equal of pipes. However, when I listen to organ recordings, I can usually place the organ very, very accurately. So, yes I AM listening to the organ on CD.....or at least sufficiently accurately that I can recognise the unmistakable music thumbprint of each organ in its given acoustic.   So why are digital organs successful?   IMHO, they work best in poor acoustics, and may even produce a better quality of sound in that sort of room, for a very simple reason.   In digital reproduction, it is very easy to create "voicing" which is completely unnatural. As something of a recording enthusiast using high quality microphones and digital recording (DAT), I can alter the sound very dramatically simply by microphone positioning. Close in gives a lot of clarity, a lot of edge and, if reproduced through high quality speakers, could produce an effect quite similar in character to the actual instrument in the actual building.   However, if I am going to give a talk or a lecture about organ matters, I know that I will be reproducing the sound in an acoustically dead room, and I therefore want people to hear instruments as they sound from a listening position. Hence, the microphones are placed well away from the instrument.   Now, if I were a digital organ maker, I could very easily take samples of organ pipe tone from a listening position rather than at the pipes themselves, and then "voice" the digital instrument accordingly. THEN I have a sound which can be reproduced digitally in a dead room, or at least a pipe TONE which were as if I was in a listening position rather than sat among the pipes.   Thus, in re-creating pipe tone, I can alter the laws of acoustics and physics, by producing a pipe tone which is completely impossible in a dead acoustic using real pipes!   I can then go Baroque or Romantic or French or German or Dutch or any other type of organ sound imaginable. I can even make a theatre organ sound, or a grand piano......the possibilities are limitless almost.   Of course, we then only have to worry about the artistic merit of real organ tone versus the illusion of real organ tone. The only alternative is to go one of two ways in a bad acoustic......the Hope-Jones/Wurlitzer way, or the 18th-early 19th century English sound of Greene, Bridge, Jordan, Bevington or Snetzler. (The Hill/Gauntlett school also works well in inferior acoustics.......the Mander organ experiments have showed that there are very musical possibilities).   You pays your money and makes your choice.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: >   >In the pipe versus other types debate, consider > then number of sound > sources, and how they move the air around the > listener. > And yes, whenever anybody listens to a CD of the > finest pipe organ on the > best audio system, they are not under the delusion > that they are really > listening to that organ   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Jewish organists From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 21:08:58 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   As I suspected, the Jewish Organ Music thread did not yield a fabulous chest of unknown organ treasures.   What then of celebrated Jewish Organists?   The only one I came across was Caleb Jarvis, who was the Civic Organist at St.George's Hall, Liverpool, here in the UK.   He was a particularly fine musician.   Being a group of people who attach great importance to achievement and education, there must be many, many more surely?   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK                     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Huge Church Organs From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 16:11:55 EST     --part1_8f.298472bb.2b80071b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Pipechatters:   Monty said:   > I'm designing a 5 manual 100+ rank organ for a church right now, and we = are > going to have some digital stops in it, because of space issues.   Please, in no way, take this question to be my passing judgement on any individual, certainly not the one who is designing this organ, but.......   1. What possible use can a church have for a 5/100+ pipe organ? (unless = the sanctuary will double as a concert hall). 2. Is there any music for worship (contemporary or traditional, = conservative or liberal, whatever) that cannot be played very well on a large 3 manual = or, at most, a 4 manual? I remember a chapter in a pipe organ book I read = many years ago that, in discussing organs for worship, said that there is no = need for more than 3 manuals on a church organ. I realize that he made a = rather sweeping statement there. 3. What would "actually" be missed if the 5th manual division were = omitted and the desired pedal ranks provided? After all, how many manuals can one =   really use in a given piece of music? If several different registrations = are needed throughout a piece, can the changes not be made in a more cost-effective way by using pistons? 4. How many $millions does an organ like this cost? I won't ask the obviously judgemental question of "is that good stewardship?".   Anyway, those questions are not meant to start a war, just for me to understand some logic behind this.   Thanks, Keith   --part1_8f.298472bb.2b80071b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Pipechatters:<BR> <BR> Monty said:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I'm designing a 5 manual 100+ = r=3D ank organ for a church right now, and we are <BR> going to have some digital stops in it, because of space = issues.</BLOCKQUOTE=3D ><BR> <BR> Please, in no way, take this question to be my passing judgement on any = indi=3D vidual, certainly not the one who is designing this organ, but.......<BR> <BR> 1.&nbsp; What possible use can a church have for a 5/100+ pipe = organ?&nbsp;=3D20=3D (unless the sanctuary will double as a concert hall).<BR> 2.&nbsp; Is there any music for worship (contemporary or traditional, = conser=3D vative or liberal, whatever) that cannot be played very well on a large 3 = ma=3D nual or, at most, a 4 manual?&nbsp; I remember a chapter in a pipe organ = boo=3D k I read many years ago that, in discussing organs for worship, said that = th=3D ere is no need for more than 3 manuals on a church organ.&nbsp; I realize = th=3D at he made a rather sweeping statement there.<BR> 3.&nbsp; What would "actually" be missed if the 5th manual division were = omi=3D tted and the desired pedal ranks provided?&nbsp; After all, how many = manuals=3D can one really use in a given piece of music? If several different = registra=3D tions are needed throughout a piece, can the changes not be made in a more = c=3D ost-effective way by using pistons?<BR> 4.&nbsp; How many $millions does an organ like this cost?&nbsp; I won't = ask=3D20=3D the obviously judgemental question of "is that good stewardship?".<BR> <BR> Anyway, those questions are not meant to start a war, just for me to = underst=3D and some logic behind this.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_8f.298472bb.2b80071b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Jewish organists From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 16:19:03 -0500   Back in student days, a classmate said the Notre-Dame Paris organist then = was Jewish: Kosher Row.   Uhh, sorry.   But he (classmate) couldn't help it, being from Texas :-)   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Huge Church Organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 21:32:16 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Oh dear! I seem to be reacting against anything Tuba Magna writes!   I would have thought that anything written with big Romantic German organs in mind, might well include a huge pallette of colour.   Of course, the design of German organs from the early to mid-19th century did not rely on the powerful Swell organ and the expression box. Hence the mass of shaded, foundation stops which could make "louder" and "softer" a musical possibility; but not of the "seamless" type we associate with French/English/American organs.   When Germany eventually switched on to Swell boxes, the size remained....in fact, got even bigger! Hence, there is an almost unbelievable range of romantic colour available on many German Romantic instruments. Surely, the Unda Maris was a very common stop at this time?   Lest we forget, composers such as Karg-Elert and Reger were writing for BIG German Romantic instruments.   Of course, others had to equal or exceed the size of these leviathans.....we have the biggest, the best, the loudest etc etc. Atlantic City and Wanamaker were the ultimate expressions of organ folly, but even in the UK, Liverpool Cathedral was bordering on the ludicrous; made bearable by the sheer quality of the sound.   Anyway, the US wouldn't be the US without monster consoles. When they've all gone, we'll all realise what has been lost!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK (Who has a tiny organ)     --- Kzimmer0817@aol.com wrote:     > > Monty said: > > > I'm designing a 5 manual 100+ rank organ for a > church right now, and we are > > going to have some digital stops in it, because of > space issues. > > Please, in no way, take this question to be my > passing judgement on any > individual, certainly not the one who is designing > this organ, but....... > > 1. What possible use can a church have for a 5/100+ > pipe organ?     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Jewish organists From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 21:34:40 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Stan, go to the back of the class and face the wall!   :)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Stan Yoder <vze2myh5@verizon.net> wrote: > Back in student days, a classmate said the > Notre-Dame Paris organist then was Jewish: Kosher > Row.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Huge Church Organs From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 17:13:31 EST     --part1_ad.2abcc7da.2b80158b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   They got a big 5 manual instrument cause they could. I would do the same. W/O digital stuff though.     --part1_ad.2abcc7da.2b80158b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>They got a big 5 = manual i=3D nstrument cause they could. <BR>I would do the same. <BR>W/O digital stuff though. <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_ad.2abcc7da.2b80158b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Bennett Organ at Decatur From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 16:14:49 -0600   I think I heard that Bennett Organ at Decatur back around 1968-69; I attended a performance of a "Passion Play" put on by Knights Templar, and = it was either there or in Peoria; can't remember for sure.   But I do remember hearing a big organ. I didn't know much about organs in those days--99% of my experience was with three kinds--a Hammond B3/C3, = the old Baldwins where every stopped sounded alike, and the Wurlitzer Theatre Organ at Vincennes University.   But I loved organs, and was thrilled to hear the Bennett. IIRC, it was muffled way back in chambers, and rather tubby, as instruments of that age often were, but, oh, was it wondrous!   Dennis Steckley    
(back) Subject: responses From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 16:25:40 -0600   HI list, Thanks to all who have responed back to me about my recent questions concerning, Casavant reeds, chest design and Bennett Organs. = Great to be a member of this group. Gary      
(back) Subject: Bennett Organ at Decatur From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2003 16:40:29 -0600   "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" wrote: =20 > I think I heard that Bennett Organ at Decatur back around 1968-69; I > attended a performance of a "Passion Play" put on by Knights Templar, a= nd it > was either there or in Peoria; can't remember for sure.   D -none of the above. But this means you certainly got around! The Passion Play has been going on for a number of decades now.=20   That is the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Bloomington. Its viability has now been insured in that the City has taken over the building from the Masons, who can no longer afford to keep it up. They have plans to turn this, along with some major additions, into a cultural Center/Arena. =20 > But I do remember hearing a big organ. =20   The organ is a M=F6ller and I take care of it.   > I didn't know much about organs in those days--99% of my experience > w= as with three kinds--a Hammond B3/C3, the > old Baldwins where every stopped sounded alike, and the Wurlitzer Theat= re > Organ at Vincennes University.   LOL. =20 > But I loved organs, and was thrilled to hear the Bennett. IIRC, it was > muffled way back in chambers, and rather tubby, as instruments of that = age > often were, but, oh, was it wondrous!   Unfortunately, the Bennett was in sad shape for a long time, and worse: was cannibalized by a now-dead "technician" and became the "Midnight Organ Supply" for other projects he was doing locally around the area.   Much of it has been parted-out now, since the original purchasers got tired of paying to store it.   Faithfully,   Rich =20 --=20 Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL