PipeChat Digest #3483 - Thursday, February 20, 2003
 
Re: Organ for Practice
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: My last message
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Oh, the value of a Larigot  :)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Organ for Practice
  by "Eliot Hunter" <eliothunter@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Huge Church Organs
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: This vs that kind of instrument
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: The Mother Church, Boston
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Sound
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
INTRODUCING lighter an irreverent Organ History of Venezuela
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Lighter and irreverent Organ History of Venezuela 01
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
The stuff of organs (was staying on topic, I think)
  by <lindr@cch.com>
RE: The stuff of organs (was staying on topic, I think)
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: "Celestes"+ French organ & music rant
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: The Mother Church, Boston
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Huh?
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organ for Practice From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 14:17:04 EST     --part1_68.2d4b873f.2b853230_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/18/03 8:58:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, eliothunter@yahoo.co.uk writes:     > I'm an organ student in London and I've problems trying to find an organ = to > practise on here. Does anyone have any idea where I should turn for = help? >   I can't offer anything absolute, but I would think that London has scads = of little churches with wonderful pipe organs to enjoy. Possibly, you might =   find one that needs an organist and would work a deal!!   Good luck. Please keep us informed of your results.   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502     --part1_68.2d4b873f.2b853230_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 2/18/0=3D 3 8:58:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, eliothunter@yahoo.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I'm an organ student in = Lon=3D don and I've problems trying to find an organ to practise on here. Does = anyo=3D ne have any idea where I should turn for help? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Ar=3D ial" LANG=3D3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Ar=3D ial" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR>I can't offer anything absolute, but I would think that London has = scads=3D of little churches with wonderful pipe organs to enjoy. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Possibl=3D y, you might find one that needs an organist and would work a deal!! <BR> <BR>Good luck. &nbsp;&nbsp;Please keep us informed of your results. <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Ac=3D res http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_68.2d4b873f.2b853230_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: My last message From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 11:18:28 EST     --part1_15b.1c16ef6f.2b850854_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Sometimes trying to clear things up just muddies the water. Lee   --part1_15b.1c16ef6f.2b850854_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#400040" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Sometimes trying to clear = things up=3D just muddies the water.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15b.1c16ef6f.2b850854_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Oh, the value of a Larigot :) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 13:52:15 EST     --part1_147.b1596e5.2b852c5f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/18/03 8:41:10 PM Eastern Standard Time, CromorneCipher@hotmail.com writes:     > Despite the fact that my resources are limited, I value my swell Larigot > quiet a bit. If you combine a 4' principal or flute and a Larigot and > subcouple it without unison (the equiv to 8 + 2 2/3), it makes a great = solo > color! I've used such an arrangment on Bach Trio Sonatas, choral = preludes, > etc. >   heeheehee.... so what you're actually saying is that you would really like = to have a Nazard 2-2/3!!! I find the nazard much more useful, especially with a string to synthesize a quintaton, and it also makes a much warmer contribution to the ensemble. Larigot's are to strident for me.... even =   quiet ones!   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502     --part1_147.b1596e5.2b852c5f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 2/18/0=3D 3 8:41:10 PM Eastern Standard Time, CromorneCipher@hotmail.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Despite the fact that my = re=3D sources are limited, I value my swell Larigot <BR>quiet a bit. &nbsp;If you combine a 4' principal or flute and a = Larigot=3D20=3D and <BR>subcouple it without unison (the equiv to 8 + 2 2/3), it makes a great = s=3D olo <BR>color! &nbsp;I've used such an arrangment on Bach Trio Sonatas, choral = p=3D reludes, <BR>etc. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Ar=3D ial" LANG=3D3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Ar=3D ial" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR>heeheehee.... so what you're actually saying is that you would really = li=3D ke to have a Nazard 2-2/3!!! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I find the nazard = much=3D20=3D more useful, especially with a string to synthesize a quintaton, and it = also=3D makes a much warmer contribution to the ensemble. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Larigot=3D 's are to strident for me.... even quiet ones! <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Ac=3D res http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_147.b1596e5.2b852c5f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ for Practice From: "Eliot Hunter" <eliothunter@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 17:57:46 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1346527563-1045677466=3D:78160 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     I'm in Central London (Russell Square). You have any idea? Thanx. Eliot alantaylor <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk> wrote:What part of London Eliot? = Alan Taylor----- Original Message ----- From: Eliot Hunter To: = pipechat@pipechat.org Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2003 12:54 AMSubject: = Organ for Practice   I'm an organ student in London and I've problems trying to find an organ = to practise on here. Does anyone have any idea where I should turn for = help?   Eliot         --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs         --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1346527563-1045677466=3D:78160 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>I'm in Central London (Russell Square).&nbsp;You have any idea? <P>Thanx. <P>Eliot <P>&nbsp; <P>&nbsp;<B><I>alantaylor &lt;alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk&gt;</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 = Transitional//EN"> <META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1141" name=3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE>   <DIV><FONT size=3D2>What part of London Eliot?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Alan Taylor</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV style=3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: = black"><B>From:</B> <A href=3D"mailto:eliothunter@yahoo.co.uk" = title=3Deliothunter@yahoo.co.uk>Eliot Hunter</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A = href=3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org" = title=3Dpipechat@pipechat.org>pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Wednesday, February 19, 2003 = 12:54 AM</DIV> <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Organ for Practice</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV> <P>I'm an organ student in London and I've problems trying to find an = organ to practise on here. Does anyone have any idea where I should turn = for help?</P> <P>Eliot</P> <P> <P><BR> <HR SIZE=3D1> <A = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><B><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>With Yahoo! Mail you can = get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</FONT></B></A><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE><p><p><br><hr = size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-1346527563-1045677466=3D:78160--  
(back) Subject: RE: Huge Church Organs From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 12:57:58 -0500   > 1. What possible use can a church have for a 5/100+ pipe organ? = (unless the sanctuary will double as a concert hall).   It has been said that the acoustic is an organ's most important stop. That's an understatement. That acoustics are an organ's most important *division* might be an understatement.   I wouldn't fault this project if the aim is to produce a world-class instrument. 100 ranks =3D a big organ, but not mammoth. There are many organs of this size on both sides of the Atlantic. However, if the = building is not reverberant, the effect isn't what one would make much of a pilgrimage to go hear and the objective is doomed. If this is an American building, I'm afraid that inductive reasoning suggests skepticism, but = hope springs eternal... wouldn't disparage the idea if the conditions were promising.      
(back) Subject: RE: This vs that kind of instrument From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 15:13:17 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Ouch! That was my fault, I guess. My apologies to Ross & Linda! Andres.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Ross & Lynda Wards <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2003 5:03 PM Subject: Re: This vs that kind of instrument     > >Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > >> >I have one client who had one of their four pipe organs replaced by = a > >> >digital. SNIP ETC > > No, I did not write that. In my total of ten weeks in the USA, I played and > heard only six organs, and none was a Moller. > > Ross        
(back) Subject: Re: The Mother Church, Boston From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 10:01:46 -0800     ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   The > organ certainly doesn't sound anything like an Aeolian-Skinner any more. > Nor does the one at the Church of the Advent. > I'd beg to differ. Advent to me still sounds like a criterion Aeolian-Skinner -- perhaps not what it sounded like in 1936 or 1963, but still very much within the A-S mainstream, at least until the new Trumpet = is used. The Mother Church I think never sounded very much like most Aeolian-Skinners, at least in part due to the acoustic gracelessness of = the building. It now benefits from a more generous acoustic, which maybe mitigates its new antiseptic qualities -- but I do agree that I wouldn't identify it as an Aeolian-Skinner on a blindfold test.   Michael Fox      
(back) Subject: Sound From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 10:45:26 -0600   I think the =93real presence=94 of pipes is due to the method by which sounds are produced. In a pipe (whether flue or reed), moving air generates the tone; in an electronic, an electronically generated tone moves the air (via a speaker). So the tone production system is precisely opposite. That, in-and-of-itself, has nothing to say about the =93quality=94 of the tone. But it does, in some ways, remind us = that pipes are =93live,=94 and electronics can be no better than the finest stereo system (which can be very fine, of course!).   And, yes, absolutely, I agree=97given the choice between 3 actual ranks and 37 high quality digital ranks, I=92ll take the three actual ranks = any day!!! ;>) In fact, I did just that=97I have a three rank M=F6ller Artiste=97but then, I could easily afford that, and I couldn=92t begin = to afford 37 high quality digital ranks!   No flames, please. I=92m just thinking and having a bit of fun.   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: INTRODUCING lighter an irreverent Organ History of Venezuela From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 13:00:25 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   When I studied the material for my "Organs & Organists of Venezuela" = series (posted in Piporg-L), I toppled over some topics and backgrounds that = amused me a lot, but were too extensive and out of topic to be published in an Organ History.   Then I remembered PipeChat, and decided to put them on as an abridged, ironic, caricaturesque version plus some anecdotes from my own 20 years experience as "Orgler". Please note that, like a caricature isn't a = portrait and an irony isn't a fact this "Lighter and irreverent history" shouldn't = be intended as an accurate organ history of my country, much more less it's diminishing.   Most Pipchatters are Piporg-L members too, but for who are not: Some of these installments are long, for that I would advise to save or print them before reading.   Enjoy!   Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet, and the cat got something to wonder about.        
(back) Subject: Lighter and irreverent Organ History of Venezuela 01 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 13:03:33 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Lighter and irreverent side of venezuelan organ history Part One Early Organ History backgrounds:   As everyone should know, Columbus discovered America... well, let's say: South America and the Caribbean. Later, one his follow-uppers Americo Vespuccio and Alonso de Ojeda stranded a ship in today's Maracaibo, saw a couple of indian huts that were built on stakes over the water and exclaimed: "Oh, look! It's a little Venice!". This way my country came to its name Venezuela. Maracaibo became important again four centuries later when oil was discovered and "Little Venice" became a Klondyke.   Coro was the first diocese on continental South America, and for a long = time the only too. Things were all but elegant there, as could be stated when = the first bishop came to take over the Diocese. In these times travelling was quite a thrill because the spanish vessels were "miracle vessels"- it was a miracle when they arrived at their destination. Many of them rest on the bottom of the caribbean sea, to the delight and instruction of modern scuba divers. His Illustrous arrived however, stepped down from the vessel, finished his thank prayer, and = looked around- but all what he saw was an endless sand box and some huts. No cathedral. No organ. He may have wondered if the Cap'n had arrived at the right site or was = drunk (as happened quite frequently) and steered in the wrong direction. But Monsignore was at the right site, and the greatest hut was the Cathedral. Monsignore was quite shocked, but things should become even worse. In Coro 362 days a year are sunny and dry. His Illustrous had the bad luck to arrive at day 363, and it started to rain like a cataract. This way, Monsignore not only could state "that the Coro Cathedral is nothing but a miserable strawhut" but that this miserable strawhut had a leaky roof too.   Three attempts had to been made to etablish the brand new diocese because = of the hellish climate and the incredible poverty of the region. And when the Bishop of Santo Domingo came to make an inspection later on, things hadn't changed: The Cathedral remained as a miserable strawhut. Amidst the High Mass it started to rain for a certain reason: in my country it's said "When people sing mistuned it starts to rain". Monsignore could confirm that. He complained about the "terrible mistune and low instruction of the singers"; and at the same time he = noticed that the Cathedral still had a leaky roof.- Of course there was no organ = or even a modest harpsihord there, only an old guitar. Further on, His Illustrous was annoyed about "the bad state of the utensiles and books". = All in all the visit was all but pleasant, and we can only hope that the wine wasn't sour, the dinner wasn't overcooked or burned, and that Monsignore wasn't awakened by a catfight at 1,00 am.   Swiftly new utensiles, books and instruments were ordered in Santo = Domingo, and the "straw hut" became a wooden one... with a solid roof. When the = new utensiles arrived the happiness was great but didn't last for long: French filibustiers came and burned down everything "shooting their pistols at = the crucifixes and holy images and tearing the new books to shreads and snipples" as state the records. That was a revenge to the massacre that = was done to the Hugonots in Florida. Other similar pirate attacks happened further on and disencouraged the modest developement of the region.   Today, things have changed for better: the french got an unique organ tradition, pirates switched to ruin organs and pianos in repair attempts, and the relationship between Miami and Venezuela improved a lot too...   Back to our history: In Coro at last a stone church was built and an Organ was imported from Santo Domingo, but all that was too late: The King = decided to move the diocese to Caracas, the parvenue city up in the mountains over La Guaira. Parvenue or not, everybody was happy: the bishop and his staff because at least they were = out of the sand box and could breath fresh air; the choir boys and musicians because Caracas housed more culture, better food and lots of pretty girls; the pretty girls...; the Elite of Caracas because their city became something important, and the plain people for all these reasons. "Caracas became Caracas" and the rest of the country became "bush and snakes". This ancient attitude subsists and difficults any history = research along with the fact that the country houses termites that fall over every wooden item like kids over a sweetie, and when they've finished wood all paper items become their Dessert.   (will be continued...)   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet, and the cat got something to wonder about.          
(back) Subject: The stuff of organs (was staying on topic, I think) From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 11:13:29 -0600             Shut up, Bruce :-) "or is that asking too much?" (as Bette Davis said in some movie or other). One could argue, certainly not I, that if one took your specious line of reasoning, one could ask one's self what are pipe organs made of? Along with puppy dogs' tails (in your case), mouse droppings, and bat guano, one finds tin, zinc, wood, glue, sometimes leather, felt, etc., etc.   For those with short fuses, no sense of humor, and a very limited vocabulary (this latter not unlike somebody in our Casablanca right now), I'm having fun with Bruce, whom I tease unmercifully, on and off lists, every once in a while.   Bob Lind (who once saw a picture of a dead owl trapped in the mouth of a huge Montre in the facade of a Clicquot organ, and that ain't no joke)   Mutterstery man sayeth:     As Bette Davis (aka Baby Jane) said: "But Blanch, YOU ARE!" (or at least your organ is!! ;-) )....   For me, aside from the obvious fact that I'm not the least bit interested, the problem with discussing digital instruments, is that there is almost nothing to discuss unless you're really turned on by diodes and transistors, etc. They have no facade (unless it's fake pipes), their sounds are judged in comparison to pipes, installation is generally a matter of putting boxes into a room, and the only striking aspect is a glitzy console, which is not my favorite part of an organ. Size seems = to be the primary strong point!       Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502        
(back) Subject: RE: The stuff of organs (was staying on topic, I think) From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 12:29:39 -0500   >Bob Lind (who once saw a picture of a dead owl trapped in the mouth of a huge Montre in the facade of a Clicquot organ, and that ain't no joke)   I hope that before the owl was removed, someone thought to play Daquin's Noel no. 1. If I am not mistaken, this set of variations is based on "A = la Venue de Noel", the tune otherwise known as "The carol of the birds."   Years ago I heard a story supposedly originating with Marie-Claire Alain, who was practicing this very piece in an old church one day, and a bird flying around in the building over her head happened to make a mess on the keys.      
(back) Subject: RE: "Celestes"+ French organ & music rant From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 13:49:09 -0500   Bob Lind writes:   > I have problems with the French when it comes to music-making. Until rather recently their orchestras were quite bad and couldn't hold a candle to just about any other country one could hear in recordings.   You and Brahms, on whose door (according to an anecdote) Debussy once knocked, presenting his card reading "French musician." Brahms sniffed, "there's no such animal" and sent Debussy away.   > Who had the worst military band by far when about 10 bands from 10 different countries got together in the Berlin stadium for some big do? = The French.   I suppose that the U.S. had the best. We certainly oughta, if it is true what I recently heard, that the combined budget for all of our military bands exceeds the National Endowment for the Humanities. Not to knock military bands, but are such priorities anything to be proud of?   > Pierre Cochereau in the middle of a mass was wailing away like a madman = in a most self-serving, circus-cum-freak-show display that had nothing to do with worship that we could discern.   I'm not surprised. Cochereau had great virtuosity and imagination but, IMHO, not always the best taste in the world. So he was a throw-back to Lefebure-Wely and examples of the type are not confined to America. As = for the organ at Notre-Dame, Albert Schweitzer explained that during World War = I the stained glass windows of the cathedral were removed for safekeeping, leaving the organ exposed to the elements, and it was never the same ever afterwards. Cochereau was not entirely to blame for the way it sounds, = and Cavaille-Coll should not be blamed at all.   > The celestes I've heard on these organs are more along the line of the frying-bacon variety or just strange-sounding than they are a warm sound that I want from MY strings.   I'd like to hear other opinions or experiences about this. I have yet to play an organ in France <sigh>. But my understanding is that French = strings are typically broad and warm, as you and I both like, and for the most = part that is what I hear in recordings. They are certainly broader than many English or older American strings, a few of which I just don't understand how anyone could like.   > I remember Robert Noehren recommending Messiaen's own recordings of his organ works. I, 19 years old, dutifully sent away to France to get everything he'd recorded. I don't think I ever made it through all those Ducretet-Thompson records. The lack of tuning = was the greatest problem for me, and the slooooooooooow tempi drove me up a = wall at that young age.   I do love those recordings, because the composer is playing the instrument he knows inside out. But you are right that the Trinite organ itself has some rough edges. An organist might change jobs for many reasons, of course. How did Naji Hakim weigh this organ in the balance when deciding whether to move from Sacre-Coeur? I'd have to suspect that he put it in = the liability column. Yet the effect is still head-and-shoulders above the typical American organ of the same size, especially taking acoustics into account.   > I'm trying to think of which CC organ I listened to a few months back. = St. Ouen, I guess. The 16' Bombarde sounded like tuned airplane motors.   Recordings can deceive. Judging from these, a friend in college expressed = a similar opinion of the organ at Ste. Clothilde, which can sound really = wild flat-out with your volume turned up. But when I heard it live, I thought that there was nothing gross or excessive about the sound at all. It = filled the building perfectly without oppressing, justifying the opinion of Widor and Schweitzer that it is the most beautiful organ in the world.   The French church never has been in very good financial condition since 1789. Furthermore, the fact that a given church's organ and organist are both world-renowned might leave its clergy, whose names will drop into obscurity on the morrow of their retirements, disgustingly unimpressed and indifferent. Now, where have we heard that before? A couple decades ago I asked a recitalist of my acquaintance why no recordings had come from Ste. Clothilde for years. His response: "the clergy, the clergy, the clergy!" Practice time at the Basilique du Sacre-Coeur is almost non-existent = because of perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. There are probably other cases of such restrictions. As Orpha Ochse details in her book "Organs and organ playing in nineteenth-century France and Belgium," this glorious tradition has always hung miraculously by a thread. None of which should detract from our admiration of the instruments or the music. We should be cherish it thankfully and sympathetically, bearing in mind the = vicissitudes that all of its champions have had to face.    
(back) Subject: RE: The Mother Church, Boston From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 14:45:24 -0500   John Speller writes:   > The organ certainly doesn't sound anything like an Aeolian-Skinner any more. Nor does the one at the Church of the Advent.   Has something happened to the organ of the Church of the Advent? This is regarded as one of the most important examples of G. Donald Harrison's = early to middle period. Last time I heard it (four or five years ago, in = service) I thought that it was beautiful, very appropriate for the Anglo-Catholic liturgy, and fully worthy of its reputation. No, it doesn't sound like = an A-S from the 1960s, and presumably never did. Not having heard many = others of the same builder and vintage, I'm not sure what to compare it with, = other than to say that the E.M. Skinner and British traditions were still = somewhat in evidence.   It would be horrifying if it were recently bent out of shape, but I trust that people there are too savvy to let that happen.   Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: Huh? From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 14:57:02 -0500   > On another occasion, the organist at a large cathedral here in NZ went = out of the west gallery onto the side gallery roof for a pee during the Sermon = - and the wind shut the door so he couldn't get back in. It was three hours after the Service before they found my friend again   This is difficult to believe, because you'd think that building codes (not to mention the logistics of actual construction) would demand an alternative, but:   According to a story, Charles Bradley, who was both organist-choirmaster = and carillonneur of the splendid Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Spokane, Wash., once went up in the central tower to play a New Year's Eve carillon recital. During this time, a storm cut off the electric power in the area. He could get back down neither by the elevator nor any other = way, and had to remain among the bells for several hours in the cold.