PipeChat Digest #3355 - Saturday, January 4, 2003
 
Blowing Bottles
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
second book on musical saws
  by "Ray Kimber" <ray@kimber.com>
Re: Blowing Bottles
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: The attack
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: The attack
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Blowing Bottles
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
The Attack
  by "danielwh1" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Finger strength
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Blowing Bottles
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: The attack
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
where to buy organ music
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Trent Sims debuts on Rochester Wurlitzer on Jan. 12 (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Funeral
  by <echogamba@aol.com>
Re: Funeral
  by "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com>
Re: Funeral (suggestions)
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: The attack
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The defence
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Blowing Bottles
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Funeral
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Funeral
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Blowing Bottles From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 09:48:10 EST     --part1_fc.21bbba74.2b484e2a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Posters,   I don't think this should conjure up the same idea as people on "Hee Haw" blowing a jug, but I've always wanted to try this with some young teens.   When I was around 12 - back when one returned the small coke bottles for $0.03 and the large ones for $0.06, we had quite a collection awaiting return. I took a pitcher of water and tuned about two octaves of bottles.   I've tho't that it would be a fun thing for kids to try - pass out the bottles as you would handbells and play some music. The music would = include chords and moving passages. While some might jump on this as being "red neck", "crude", or whatever, it has nothing to do with CCM. You could = even play some hymns like this.   My worry tho' is, as can happen with kids, they might get the tho't that = it was silly (blowing bottles) and would get to smiling or chuckling to the point that they couldn't blow the bottle properly.   One could do the same with some organ pipes. I realize that it's probably =   not a good idea to blow our moist breath into pipes. Maybe if one has = some pipes that aren't terribly "fine" they would serve this function.   Keith   --part1_fc.21bbba74.2b484e2a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Posters,<BR> <BR> I don't think this should conjure up the same idea as people on "Hee Haw" = blowing a jug, but I've always wanted to try this with some young = teens.<BR> <BR> When I was around 12 - back when one returned the small coke bottles for = $0.03 and the large ones for $0.06, we had quite a collection awaiting = return.&nbsp; I took a pitcher of water and tuned about two octaves of = bottles.<BR> <BR> I've tho't that it would be a fun thing for kids to try - pass out the = bottles as you would handbells and play some music.&nbsp; The music would = include chords and moving passages.&nbsp; While some might jump on this as = being "red neck", "crude", or whatever, it has nothing to do with = CCM.&nbsp; You could even play some hymns like this.<BR> <BR> My worry tho' is, as can happen with kids, they might get the tho't that = it was silly (blowing bottles) and would get to smiling or chuckling to = the point that they couldn't blow the bottle properly.<BR> <BR> One could do the same with some organ pipes.&nbsp; I realize that it's = probably not a good idea to blow our moist breath into pipes.&nbsp; Maybe = if one has some pipes that aren't terribly "fine" they would serve this = function.<BR> <BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_fc.21bbba74.2b484e2a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: second book on musical saws From: "Ray Kimber" <ray@kimber.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 07:57:12 -0700   Scribner, Tom Lumberjack, with Appendix on Musical Saw Very Rare. This amazingly wonderful item was self published (actually self-mimeographed, assembled and stapled) by Scribner himself in about = 1967. This 4th edition is the first to include his short appendix on the musical saw, an art--to which this author can personally attest--at which Scribner excelled. Scribner was a wobbly, a real rabble-rouser (hence the closing = to his introduction: "Don't let the bastards get you down") and the editor of "Lumberjack News" and "Redwood Ripsaw". He could be seen daily in Santa Cruz, as an elderly gentleman, wearing his vest and bowler hat, bent over the saw from which he pulled sweet notes(there is actually a bronze = tribute statue to him in 'Scribner Park'.) Anyway, this is his story in 60, hand-typed and mimeographed, single-sided pages      
(back) Subject: Re: Blowing Bottles From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 09:01:31 -0600   For those that might be interested here is the link to the Peterson "Beer Bottle" Organ - http://www.petersontuners.com/news/bbo/index.cfm   There are audio clips of it playing along with a ABC TV feature on it.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: The attack From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 04 Jan 2003 09:12:08 -0600   Colin Mitchell wrote: > > Hello, > > I've been thinkingh about this business of "attack", and > even went along to church to check it all out (freezing > cold....such dedication!) > > I have come to the conclusion that the "intimacy" of > attack possible via tracker action is complete > garbage.......   I am inclined to agree with you, and believe that much of what has been written on this subject is nonsense. What gives tracker action a feeling of intimacy is the "pluck" which provides a tactile feedback to the player's fingers. The action says, "hello, here I am" to the player's fingers at the moment the pallet opens. On many modern tracker actions, however, the pluck has been deliberately minimized in order to lighten the action and attempt to provide control over the attack, which in my opinion is misguided. Both the sensitivity and the longevity of mechanical actions would be enhanced considerably if players were prepared to put up with a slightly heavier touch, as in many Victorian organs which (unlike many modern ones) have proved extremely reliable.   I do, however, believe that it is important for the stops, particularly the diapason chorus, to stand on a common channel, viz.: by having a slider chest, whether the action that operates it is mechanical or electric. This makes an important difference to the coherence of the chorus.   A good action, tracker or electric, will however give a a clearer initial attack than a poor one. It may be the action that is preventing your sleepy diapason from waking up quite as quickly as it would like to.     John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: The attack From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 10:20:31 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_004B_01C2B3DA.E93062E0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Dear Greg, If you use your shoulder then don't you still put strain on your =3D wrist? I know that if I couple the manuals on a tracker, it seems that =3D the pressure needed to play seems to be more than the dexterity I need =3D to play trills. Who was the builder of the trackers you speak of? Paul ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=3D20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 Sent: Saturday, January 04, 2003 4:13 AM Subject: Re: The attack     In a message dated 1/3/2003 8:37:52 PM Central Standard Time, =3D chercapa@enter.net writes:=3D20       .=3D20 Just wondering if anyone feels that they can improvise much =3D easier on a EP than a tracker. I find that I have to concentrate too =3D much on the keyboard action than on the music in my head when I =3D improvise on a tracker. Yes I know. The problem is right in there. = LOL.=3D20       As far as I am concerned everything is easier on an EP. I am in my =3D 4th year of college and have had a large tracker and 2 smaller ones at =3D my disposal. I think suspended action trackers teach self control, =3D restraint and economy of motion more than sheer athleticism. They are =3D like a harpsichord. If you play too hard, especially when divisions =3D aren't coupled down, you can hear it in the action and the pipe speech. = =3D When divisons are coupled, it teaches you not to tense up your hand but = =3D to push down from the shoulder. I have an easier time improvising on =3D trackers when they are coupled.=3D20 Greg=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_004B_01C2B3DA.E93062E0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4611.1300" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Dear Greg,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If you use = =3D your shoulder=3D20 then don't you still put strain on your wrist? I know that if I couple =3D the=3D20 manuals on a tracker, it seems that the pressure needed to play seems to = =3D be more=3D20 than the dexterity I need to play trills. Who was the builder of the =3D trackers=3D20 you speak of?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial=3D20 size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbs= =3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= =3D ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= =3D &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= =3D nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D20 Paul</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3DGfc234@aol.com =3D href=3D3D"mailto:Gfc234@aol.com">Gfc234@aol.com</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Saturday, January 04, =3D 2003 4:13=3D20 AM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: The attack</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>In a =3D message dated=3D20 1/3/2003 8:37:52 PM Central Standard Time, <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:chercapa@enter.net">chercapa@enter.net</A> writes: =3D <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = =3D solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"=3D20 TYPE=3D3D"CITE">. </FONT><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#000000 =3D size=3D3D3=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial =3D color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Just wondering if =3D anyone feels=3D20 that they can improvise much easier on a EP than a tracker. I find =3D that I=3D20 have to concentrate too much on the keyboard action than on the =3D music in my=3D20 head when I improvise on a tracker. Yes I know. The problem is right = =3D in=3D20 there. LOL.</FONT><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#000000 = =3D size=3D3D3=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D3D0 = =3D face=3D3DArial=3D20 color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><BR>As far as I am = =3D concerned=3D20 everything is easier on an EP. &nbsp;I am in my 4th year of college =3D and have=3D20 had a large tracker and 2 smaller ones at my disposal. &nbsp;I think =3D suspended=3D20 action trackers teach self control, restraint and economy of motion =3D more than=3D20 sheer athleticism. &nbsp;They are like a harpsichord. &nbsp;If you =3D play too=3D20 hard, especially when divisions aren't coupled down, you can hear it =3D in the=3D20 action and the pipe speech. &nbsp;When divisons are coupled, it =3D teaches you=3D20 not to tense up your hand but to push down from the shoulder. &nbsp;I = =3D have an=3D20 easier time improvising on trackers when they are coupled. =3D <BR>Greg</FONT>=3D20 </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_004B_01C2B3DA.E93062E0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Blowing Bottles From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 10:33:25 EST   In a message dated 1/4/03 9:49:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, Kzimmer0817@aol.com writes:   << I've tho't that it would be a fun thing for kids to try - pass out the bottles as you would handbells and play some music. The music would = include chords and moving passages. >>   You're too late, it's already been done. They appeared on David Letterman = a few years ago.   <A HREF=3D"http://www.stlukespr.org/Bband/brandenburg.ram">Click here: St. =   Luke's Bottle Band</A>  
(back) Subject: The Attack From: "danielwh1" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 11:35:43 -0400   http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2625687.stm check that link out An Historic Abbey was ransacked by an Axe swinging madman Links to reports in Realvideoi and audio available there     Daniel     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.435 / Virus Database: 244 - Release Date: 30/12/2002  
(back) Subject: Finger strength From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 11:10:39 EST   The fact that mechanical action helps develop finger strength and control = is another argument in support of the theory that organists should also = continue to play the piano. SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Blowing Bottles From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 12:39:11 EST     --part1_8c.21f8b8a0.2b48763f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I think it would depend what was in the bottles! lol greg   --part1_8c.21f8b8a0.2b48763f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I think it would depend = what was in the bottles! <BR>lol <BR>greg</FONT></HTML>   --part1_8c.21f8b8a0.2b48763f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: The attack From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 12:45:51 EST     --part1_c9.2e0dd3a4.2b4877cf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   The large one is a 1983 Martin Ott-very exacting action...The most precise =   feeling organ I've ever played...The stoplist on this site is slightly = wrong: <A HREF=3D"http://www.martinottpipeorgan.com/OpusGallery1/Opus17.htm">NIU = Main Organ</A> When I said, "Push from the shoulder," I meant VERY slightly, to replace = the need for tension in the hands and wrists, which will make playing the = Widor Toccata a daunting task on that organ. The smaller organs are a 17 rank Zimmer from the 70's and a 10 rank = Flentrop from the 60's.     --part1_c9.2e0dd3a4.2b4877cf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>The large one is a 1983 = Martin Ott-very exacting action...The most precise feeling organ I've ever = played...The stoplist on this site is slightly wrong: <A = HREF=3D"http://www.martinottpipeorgan.com/OpusGallery1/Opus17.htm">NIU = Main Organ</A> <BR>When I said, "Push from the shoulder," I meant VERY slightly, to = replace the need for tension in the hands and wrists, which will make = playing the Widor Toccata a daunting task on that organ. <BR>The smaller organs are a 17 rank Zimmer from the 70's and a 10 rank = Flentrop from the 60's. <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_c9.2e0dd3a4.2b4877cf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: where to buy organ music From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 04 Jan 2003 10:24:38 -0800   George Butterfield at Organ Stop in San Diego. He's an organist, and he knows his way around the foreign editions. Don't let the west coast location put you off ... their mail service is fast.   The e-mail address is:   organstopsales@aol.com   Unfortunately they don't have an 800 number, but George checks his e-mail constantly.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Trent Sims debuts on Rochester Wurlitzer on Jan. 12 (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 15:14:01 -0500   RTOS welcomes Ohio's Trent Sims to his debut on our Wurlitzer 4/23 on = Sunday afternoon, January 12 at 2:30 PM. Trent's performance takes place in the spacious art-deco Auditorium Center, 875 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Information on the concert, driving directions to the Auditorium, Trent's biog. info and much more can be found at: http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ .   Tickets at only $10 each will be available at the box office one hour = before the 2:30 PM start. This will be another outstanding presentation of = theater pipe organ entertainment.   Regards, Ken Evans, RTOS Director (past-President)      
(back) Subject: Funeral From: <echogamba@aol.com> Date: Sat, 04 Jan 2003 18:15:22 -0500   Dear Listers.   I was told on Thursday evening that a good friend of mine, and a long term = chorister in the church choir where I play the organ, died suddenly on = Thursday morning. John was only 60, but suffered a massive heart attack. = I am deeply saddened by this news and have spent the past two days in a = state of severe stress. After a difficult Christmas and not too good a = past year, this news has left me with all the symptoms of stress that = there is!! My Prayers go out to his wife and young family.   My reason for writing?? His widow, whom I visited today, has asked me to = choose the hymns for his funeral which takes place on Friday at 12:30. = John sat beside my organ stool so I know what music he liked!! John was a = very modern 60 year old and enjoyed nothing more than a good sing in the = choir, but did this in a very devout way. I am therefore thinking of = using 'modern' hymns to reflect his interest and enjoyment in this style, = and also to keep it as a service of celebration, rather than a mournful = occasion. But anyway.......   Could any of you listers suggest organ music for before and after the = service?? i.e. as the family enter and leave the church. As I have = already mentioned, John was keen on not only traditional liturgical music, = but also got alot from modern Christian music. Any ideas along those line = would be gratefully received. I am looking for something cheerful, but = appropriate. Does that make sense??   Sorry for going on, but I do feel better for getting it off my chest.   Paul. EchoGamba@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral From: "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 18:36:29 -0500   My unsolicited advice is once you plan the service, grieve and cry during your practice sessions. That is your personal mourning time. When you = can grieve/cry no more, you are ready to emote, through your music, and allow others their time. When you do this, you won't be playing the service through tears.   Robert Clooney      
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral (suggestions) From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 18:59:17 EST     --part1_108.1d5e08d6.2b48cf55_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/4/2003 6:16:23 PM Eastern Standard Time, echogamba@aol.com writes:     > . As I have already mentioned, John was keen on not only traditional > liturgical music, but also got alot from modern Christian music. Any = ideas >   There is a piece by William Mathias thaat would be approprite and is not a =   terribly diffiult piece to learn/play. it is "Canzonetta" and is published = by OUP in an album of pieces of William Mathias. Also, how about the partita on Engelberg (When In Our Music God Is = Glorified) by Austin Lovelace.   hope this helps   Rick in VA   --part1_108.1d5e08d6.2b48cf55_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/4/2003 6:16:23 PM Eastern Standard Time, echogamba@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">. &nbsp;As I have = already mentioned, John was keen on not only traditional liturgical music, = but also got alot from modern Christian music. &nbsp;Any ideas along those = line would be gratefully received</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>There is a piece by William Mathias thaat would be approprite and is = not a terribly diffiult piece to learn/play. it is "Canzonetta" and is = published by OUP in an album of pieces of William Mathias. <BR>Also, how about the partita on Engelberg (When In Our Music God Is = Glorified) by Austin Lovelace. <BR> <BR>hope this helps <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_108.1d5e08d6.2b48cf55_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: The attack From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Jan 2003 00:38:55 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I must mention this to the International Improvisation people at Haarlem! An organ like that NEEDS EP action I think.   :)   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: Just wondering if anyone feels that they can improvise much easier on a EP than a tracker.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The defence From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Jan 2003 00:49:21 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   No John, it's just a very sleepy Principal!   It's tone almost surpasses beauty....ravishing! It is the nearest thing I have ever heard to the 8ft Principal on the Hauptwerk of Rot-en-der-Rot by Holzhey.....but the penalty is a very slow intonation; especially in the bottom two octaves; just as at Rot-en-der-Rot.   I can live with it! (I have for the past 27 years)   Regards   Colin Mitchell UK             --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote   It may be the action that is preventing your sleepy diapason from waking up quite as quickly as it would like to.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Blowing Bottles From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Jan 2003 01:03:01 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I have found that Organists are the sort of people who compulsively blow beer bottles, soda bottles and any bottle they can get their hands on. (Full ones are best, because this makes the behaviour excusable)   My friends and I have played Christmas Carols on them!   The only thing more annoying to people, is when I equally compulsively dip my forefinger in the wine and make the glass sing.....everyone's teeth on edge.   However, Henry Willis IV has quite a party trick....a bit of a class act in fact.   He brings along a narrow Viole pipe about 3ft long and, as he talks, he uses a sharp knife to reduce the length and adjust the speech by carving away at the upper lip. Eventually, as his speech concludes, he is left with a small flute, and by using his hand as a tuning shade, then concludes by playing the UK National Anthem!!   The other great party trick was the sole preserve of Nicholas Kynaston, who would pick up matchsticks with his widely open fingers; filling both hands with them without dropping a single match.   Try it! It's very, very difficult.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- David Scribner wrote: > For those that might be interested here is the link > to the Peterson > "Beer Bottle" Organ - >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 04 Jan 2003 20:33:37 -0500   On 1/4/03 6:15 PM, "echogamba@aol.com" <echogamba@aol.com> wrote:   > Dear Listers. > > I was told on Thursday evening that a good friend of mine, and a long = term > chorister in the church choir where I play the organ, died suddenly on > Thursday morning.   Dear EchoGamba: Consider his ethnic roots. Finnish, Portuguese, Irish, whatever. Pick a thing or two from those sources. Apart from his personal tastes, I think it would mean something to his siblings, nieces, nephews, etc. And probably EVERY "national" school has very good stuff to draw from.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 21:21:52 EST   Paul, I'm so sorry that your year is starting off with sadness. I would = suggest carrying the feeling of hope and joy from the hymns to the organ music. = I don't know what your repertory is, or what denomination the service will = be. However, moving from there...   My favorite postlude for funerals is the Franck a-minor chorale. I begin with the section after the trompette solo moving into the beautiful fugal section. By the time that you arrive to the restatement of the beginning theme, the procession has usually cleared the nave. I get many very positive comments regarding the appropriateness and positive feelings from =   this piece. I know that it always does me good, too.   For the prelude, Mendelssohn's Prelude and Fugue in G (Three Preludes) is = a good, strong piece. Another excellent piece is the Prelude from Dubois Twelve Pieces. Also pieces such as Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring, Sheep = May Safely Graze (Bach) are cheerful sound and hopeful and comforting in text association.   I presently pay in a Southerrn Baptist church, and have found that people = are very appreciative of concluding the service with an improvisaion on "When = We All Get To Heaven." This is a wonderfully appropriate hymn, but is probably known only to the Southern Baptists.   Also included in my funeral prelude repertoir are pieces from Rheinberger sonatas, as well as his fughettas and trios.   I avoid solemn, and morn pieces such as chorale preludes dealing with = death topics and in slow/minor moods. Minor keys are not totally avoided = since they greatly enhance the major ones! Charles Callahan's quiet preludes = are also very good, such as Folk Tune and Chant Sans Parole (?). Alec = Rowley's Pastorale from Five Pieces is also well liked.   Interspersed among my repertory pieces are hymns requested by the family, played in fairly straight-forward manner. They requested these hymns, so =   they would probably appreciate being able to recognize them and also be = able to think the text as the tune is played. And, very importantly, USE = CHIMES! Chimes are extremely helpful to people in times of emotional stress. =   I'm told this after almost every funeral.   The main thing is to avoid the maudlin and over-somber. I was told by a teacher, "if people cry at a wedding or funeral it's the organist's = fault."   I consider funerals to be one of the most important aspects of my ministry = as a church organist, and am usually told afterwary by someone attending that =   the music was very helpful and comforting to them.     Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502