PipeChat Digest #3358 - Monday, January 6, 2003
 
Re: The indefensible
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The attack ... and release
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Re: The indefensible
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: The indefensible
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Pipe Speech Delay
  by "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com>
Re: Pipe Speech Delay
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The indefensible
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: The indefensible
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Upcoming travels
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Pipe Speech Delay
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe Speech Delay
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Music Christmas II
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Re: The attack ... and release
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The indefensible
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
It's the ATTITUDE that's indefensible
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Pipe Speech Delay
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Pipe Speech Delay
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
hymns
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Please read , ALL canadian Pipe Organ Builders
  by "danielwh1" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The indefensible From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 12:36:58 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3124701418_1240640 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 1/5/03 7:01 PM, "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:   >> I am part Dutch. In fact Ceurvorst means "little king". >>=3D20 >>=3D20 Would =3DB3princelet=3DB2 or =3DB3princeling=3DB2 be a reasonable = approximation?   Alan   --B_3124701418_1240640 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: The indefensible</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 1/5/03 7:01 PM, &quot;Alan Freed&quot; = &lt;=3D acfreed0904@earthlink.net&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><FONT = SIZE=3D3D"2">=3D I am part Dutch. &nbsp;In fact Ceurvorst means &quot;little king&quot;. = <BR> <BR> </FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New = Roman"><FONT =3D SIZE=3D3D"2"><BR> </FONT>Would &#8220;princelet&#8221; or &#8220;princeling&#8221; be a = reaso=3D nable approximation? &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3124701418_1240640--    
(back) Subject: Re: The attack ... and release From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 12:12:02 -0600     Having gone through a tracker-backer phase that lasted at least two decades, I've returned to a preference for symphonic-style E-P organs during the last decade or more. I'll add two points.   1. On revisiting a pretty rotten mechanical-action Bosch a few times = during the last 10 years, I couldn't help appreciating the crispness of rhythmic articulation with a fullish registration at the very beginning of the transcription of William Walton's "Crown Imperial." The piece absolutely comes alive and immediately alerts the listener that something special is happening. This effect is impossible on any E-P organ I know, and it's interesting to me that 20th-century music can be enhanced as well as baroque works that one hears on these organs ad nauseam.   2. It's amazing to me that many fine organists don't listen to their releases of notes (primarily reeds). One must be aware of a gentle pull-back of the finger/hand/arm lest the reed let out a "yip," which I find annoying in the extreme. Does this only happen on slider chests? I haven't played enough nonslider organs lately to remember, but I surely = get angry with myself when I'm not thinking about the importance of attack AND release.   Robert Lind           Colin Mitchell wrote: >   > I have come to the conclusion that the "intimacy" of > attack possible via tracker action is complete > garbage.......   I am inclined to agree with you, and believe that much of what has been written on this subject is nonsense. What gives tracker action a feeling of intimacy is the "pluck" which provides a tactile feedback to the player's fingers. The action says, "hello, here I am" to the player's fingers at the moment the pallet opens. On many modern tracker actions, however, the pluck has been deliberately minimized in order to lighten the action and attempt to provide control over the attack, which in my opinion is misguided.     John Speller                  
(back) Subject: Re: The indefensible From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 13:16:23 -0800   >In a message dated 1/4/2003 9:08:25 PM Central Standard Time, >cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: > >>Dutch....they never explode in your face. >> > > >I am part Dutch. In fact Ceurvorst means "little king". > >lololol >Greg   I am 100% Dutch, I'll consider the statement, smile at you, and will eventually get even ! LOL  
(back) Subject: Re: The indefensible From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 13:30:52 -0500   At 01:16 PM 1/6/2003 -0800, you wrote: >>In a message dated 1/4/2003 9:08:25 PM Central Standard Time, >>cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: >> >>>Dutch....they never explode in your face. >> >> >>I am part Dutch. In fact Ceurvorst means "little king". >> >>lololol >>Greg > >I am 100% Dutch, I'll consider the statement, smile at you, and will > eventually get even ! LOL   Hi,   I'm not Dutch, or at least I don't think I am. I am Canadian, but with 100% Dutch blood.   When talking to a Dutchman about organs, it is useful to remember the following maxim about the Dutch.   They, "wooden shoe, wooden head, wooden listen".   Their mind is made up.   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Pipe Speech Delay From: "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 14:49:08 -0500   I'm having a difficulty and need advice.   There is too long a delay between the depressed key, speaking of the pipe, hearing it, and the congregation beginning to sing. It's all nanoseconds, but it's causing me a problem. I start with a rousing introduction and = each subsequent stanza becomes slower and slower. Even the choir falls behind in the choral introit.   I'm told this has always been a problem with the organ. Choir members have said to just play and don't listen to the music or you start to slow down trying to hear the music. It feels really strange.   Feedback please, Robert Clooney (First Pres, Goshen, NY)    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Speech Delay From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 14:58:43 -0500   On 1/6/03 2:49 PM, "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com> wrote:   > Choir members have said to just play and don't listen to the music or = you > start to slow down trying to hear the music.   I think that's excellent advice; I received it many years ago. Play a bit "detached."   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: The indefensible From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 15:19:07 -0800   > >Hi, > >I'm not Dutch, or at least I don't think I am. I am Canadian, but >with 100% Dutch blood. > >When talking to a Dutchman about organs, it is useful to remember >the following maxim about the Dutch. > >They, "wooden shoe, wooden head, wooden listen". > >Their mind is made up. > >Arie V.   Maybe won't listen, 'cause we know we're right??? LOL (this could go on forever)   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: The indefensible From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 15:39:03 -0500   At 03:19 PM 1/6/2003 -0800, you wrote:   >>Hi, >> >>I'm not Dutch, or at least I don't think I am. I am Canadian, but with >>100% Dutch blood. >> >>When talking to a Dutchman about organs, it is useful to remember the >>following maxim about the Dutch. >> >>They, "wooden shoe, wooden head, wooden listen". >> >>Their mind is made up. >> >>Arie V. > >Maybe won't listen, 'cause we know we're right??? LOL (this could go on =   >forever) > >John V     Hi,   I don't know if it is so much "because we're right" as "do'in it my way" = as Sinatra would sing it.   I will admit though my love for organs comes from a trip to Holland in the =   70s when I was a lad. They have beautiful sounding organs over there, = most of them not very big, but a rich generous sound. Most of these organs = also do not play a lot of organ repertoire very well as they are designed for congregational accompaniment. I wish there were some of these type of organs here in Canada for me to go and listen to.   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Upcoming travels From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 16:39:50 -0500   List -   I'm on the move again, this time to points west (Florida to Phoenix, Sacramento and back). I've gotten a hold of Dave Moreno (caretaker of the organ at Towe Museum in Sacramento) and will be playing it on Friday morning. I'm also going to be playing at Organ Stop Pizza in Mesa on Wednesday sometime. Thursday is a day of travel to the Sacramento area = and Saturday will be travel back to Phoenix (after playing for a 50th wedding anniversary in Auburn, Ca. [the main reason for the trip]). I was informed of a Valley of the Sun Chapter meeting on Sunday at 3 that I'm going to = try very hard to attend. I'm looking for other instruments that are available to play (public or private) on Wednesday either before or after I play at Organ Stop in Mesa.   Any suggestions and/or inroads would be greatly appreciated. I'll be leaving Florida at 6:00am EDT on 1/7/2003 and arriving in Phoenix at approximately 2:00pm.   If you have any ideas please reply to my mobile e-mail address: thoehn01@sprintpcs.com with pertinent information, I'll supply my contact number via private post if necessary.   Thank You all..... Tom Hoehn, Organist Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes (substitute) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn      
(back) Subject: Pipe Speech Delay From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 17:04:29 -0500   Dear Robert,   Your choir members are correct. I sit in a balcony, and while I hear the singing reasonably well, the rhythmic realities are not always that clear. = I have my own little totally silent, internal, "click track" that carries me on, = as does the steady beating at the firm old mechanical action. I have become quite used to taking the lead and holding on to it. The fun comes when you lose track of what verse you have reached in a long hymn. Fortunately, the choir, which is down below except for a motet after Communion, has a = couple of enthusiastic consonant-spitters, so I can generally differentiate "This SSStar drew nigh" from "Then entered in . . . !"   So actually, your chorister is at least mostly right, but one does not really entirely cease listening, but only needs to note that his/her strategy is working. But I think his/her point is partly that if you do listen, you will hear the congregation lagging, and if you once respond to that by slowing down to join them, you might well ultimately grind to a halt!   Also, the instrument I play is very clear and articulate, and I am sure helps to keep the congregation moving with me, more-or-less!   So be it,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 06, 2003 2:49 PM Subject: Pipe Speech Delay     > I'm having a difficulty and need advice. > > There is too long a delay between the depressed key, speaking of the = pipe, > hearing it, and the congregation beginning to sing. It's all = nanoseconds, > but it's causing me a problem. I start with a rousing introduction and each > subsequent stanza becomes slower and slower. > Even the choir falls behind in the choral introit. > > I'm told this has always been a problem with the organ. > Choir members have said to just play and don't listen to the music or = you > start to slow down trying to hear the music. It feels really strange. > > Feedback please, > Robert Clooney (First Pres, Goshen, NY)      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Speech Delay From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 15:58:30 -0800 (PST)     --- Malcolm Wechsler <manderusa@earthlink.net> wrote: >Malcolm,   Would you please post the stoplist of your Hook and Hastings? I believe some sincere, inquiring minds would be interested in your instrument.   Best wishes to all,   Morton Belcher   > Also, the instrument I play is very clear and > articulate, and I am sure > helps to keep the congregation moving with me, > more-or-less! > > So be it, > > Malcolm Wechsler > www.mander-organs.com > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, January 06, 2003 2:49 PM > Subject: Pipe Speech Delay > > > > I'm having a difficulty and need advice. > > > > There is too long a delay between the depressed > key, speaking of the pipe, > > hearing it, and the congregation beginning to > sing. It's all nanoseconds, > > but it's causing me a problem. I start with a > rousing introduction and > each > > subsequent stanza becomes slower and slower. > > Even the choir falls behind in the choral introit. > > > > I'm told this has always been a problem with the > organ. > > Choir members have said to just play and don't > listen to the music or you > > start to slow down trying to hear the music. It > feels really strange. > > > > Feedback please, > > Robert Clooney (First Pres, Goshen, NY) > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. http://mailplus.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Music Christmas II From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 16:19:48 -0500   Hi List,   Our organist has recently discovered the music of Denis Bedard and we were =   treated to "Variations on In Dulci Jubilo" as a prelude and "Toccata on See the infant so Divine" as a postlude. What wonderful music M. Bedard composes. I feel that it must appeal to both initiated and uninitiated listeners since it is so musical. The performance of the postlude received generous applause from the many that stayed to listen.   HD      
(back) Subject: Re: The attack ... and release From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 00:51:49 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   How very true!   Robert makes a valid point about playing in general.....the release of notes. Carfeul attention to articulation (be it attack or release) is, of course, greatly aided by the "feed back" from a good tracker action.   To use the analogy of driving sports cars once more, (you people must get fed up of this!) I can tell you that the tiny messages which feed back to a driver are absolutely critical to perfect control at high speed. Hence, tracker action is a definite boost to articulation and a great confidence booster.   "You know where you are with tracker"   On a more general level, I have few real enemies. However, one organist (an ex-Cambridge Uni Organ Scholar) would happily throw me onto a nest full of soldier ants because he overheard a comment I once made to one of my pupils.   "He would be a good organist if he used the other half of his brain to pick the notes up afterwards!"   Dr Francis Jackson (Emeritus Organist of York Minster) put it perfectly when he said, "Always allow a little daylight between the notes, because legato then means something".   Of course, what ALL organists fear is the sort of shallow, springy touch associated with poor keyboards and even pedalboards. Top resistance at the key or pedal is an absolute "must" for clean, articulate playing.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The indefensible From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 01:00:53 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   That isn't far removed from what they say about Yorkshiremen in the UK!   "Yorkshire born an' Yorkshire bred, strong in t'arm and thick in t'head!!"   A few Yorkshire folk still wear "clogs" (wooden shoes) as well.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Arie Vandenberg <ArieV@classicorgan.com> wrote: > > > Hi, > When talking to a Dutchman about organs, it is > useful to remember the > following maxim about the Dutch. > > They, "wooden shoe, wooden head, wooden listen". > > > Arie V. > > > >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: It's the ATTITUDE that's indefensible From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 19:08:14 -0600   Arie V. wrote:   > When talking to a Dutchman about organs, it is useful to remember the > following maxim about the Dutch.   > They, "wooden shoe, wooden head, wooden listen".   > Their mind is made up.   Then John Vanderlee replied:   > Maybe won't listen, 'cause we know we're right??? LOL (this could > go on forever)   I grew up in West Michigan, a real bastion of the Dutch, and they have a saying up there: "If you ain't Dutch, you ain't much! Kind of goes hand-in-glove with the arrogance John V. implies.   I'm not impressed. I couldn't WAIT until I could grow up and move out of West Michigan! Being of an obviously different descent, it was nothing but misery for me to grow up with the arrogant Dutch yuppie kids in my high school.   Painful memories. Things got MUCH better once I got over to eastern Michigan (Dennis Goward former territory) where I met my wife, who is the daughter of a late Detroit firefighter.   Faithfully,   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Speech Delay From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 01:44:47 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   A reply for Robert Clooney re: hymn accompaniment   The first thing to know is that you are not alone!   I know of a VERY fine cathedral organist who had this problem in his younger days.....detached console, vast church, big delays, a slowing down of the verses etc.   I showed him how to accompany hymns, and it worked for him. He taught me how to play the organ....a fair exchange!   We have just been discussing "lifting" notes as well as putting them down.......this is critical to clean accompaniment of hymns. Allow daylight and make your accompaniment slightly detached from one note to the next.   If they STILL slow down, increase that detatchment to a distinct stacatto in strict rhythm.   However, the most critical thing is the timing of verse ends, which is going to be difficult to explain without manuscript paper.....but I'll try!   (At this point, I have to think of internationally known tunes)     Take a four-square tune which starts on a strong beat. You get to the end of the verse and, on the final note, count 4 + 4; releasing the last note on the next 1 of the next 1234. (Think about that) You are then left with silence for 2, 3 and 4 before the next verse starts on the next strong beat. (It doesn't actually matter if the hymn starts on the 3rd beat of the bar, because it will then finish with two beats; therefore still requiring a count of 4, but technically 3,4 then 1,2.....such as "The old 100th" or "Nun danket"   The big mistake that the cathedral organist was making, was to count 3 at the end of every verse NO MATTER WHAT THE TIME SIGNATURE. It was a disaster!   In other words, the silences MUST be in strict time at the end of each verse, and consistent.   If we have a hymn in (say) 3/4 time, which starts on a weak beat (3rd beat of the bar) eg: 'The day thou gavest"....then you lift off on three of 1,2,3 and come in on the 3 of the next 1,2,3....in other words, still a full bar of silence in effect, but IN TIME.   Other points include:   Keeping registrations "brighter" rather than "duller" in tone, but with a firm, dancing pedal part....no long held notes on the pedal; especially at line ends.   Another tip....sing along as you play, but keep in strict rhythm.   Expression should not be of the flapping swell pedal variety or extensive changes of registration mid-verse.   BUT THE KEY IS IN THE SILENCES!!   Rather disconcerting is the fact that the best accompanist to hymns I ever heard was Phil Kelsall, who plays the Wurlitzer Organ at the Tower Ballroom, Blackpool. The man just has natural rhythm, and 3,000 people DARE NOT do anything but sing along with him!!   There's a lesson there somewhere.   Private me if you have continuing problems....I'm sure we can soon get them swinging along in time.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       >           __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Speech Delay From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 21:19:59 EST     --part1_46.33810d5b.2b4b934f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/6/2003 2:49:32 PM Eastern Standard Time, basset3@hvc.rr.com writes:     > . I start with a rousing introduction and each > subsequent stanza becomes slower and slower. > Even the choir falls behind in the choral introit. > > I'm told this has always been a problem with the organ. > Choir members have said to just play and don't listen to the music or = you > start to slow down trying to hear the music. It feels really strange. > > Feedback please, >   The problem is (IMHO) tht you re slowing down in response to what you her = the congregtion singing (or the choir) rather than leading. Once you establish =   your tempo, you need to maintain that tempo, and NOT listen to the = apparent speed at which the singing is happening. I know that in the church where I =   play (and where the majority of congregants sit in the rear of the = church... a very long way from where the organ console is...there is a HUGH time = delay, so I am typically a full beat ahead of what I hear them singing...it takes =   time for the sound to travel out, time for them to respond, and time for their singing to reach my ears, If I were to play what I hear them = singing, we would never get to a 4th verse, we would have ground to a halt before then!!!   hope this helps     Rick in VA   --part1_46.33810d5b.2b4b934f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/6/2003 2:49:32 PM Eastern Standard Time, basset3@hvc.rr.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">. &nbsp;I start = with a rousing introduction and each <BR>subsequent stanza becomes slower and slower. <BR>Even the choir falls behind in the choral introit. <BR> <BR>I'm told this has always been a problem with the organ. <BR>Choir members have said to just play and don't listen to the music or = you <BR>start to slow down trying to hear the music. &nbsp;It feels really = strange. <BR> <BR>Feedback please, <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>The problem is (IMHO) tht you re slowing down in response to what you = her the congregtion singing (or the choir) rather than leading. Once you = establish your tempo, you need to maintain that tempo, and NOT listen to = the apparent speed at which the singing is happening. I know that in the = church where I play (and where the majority of congregants sit in the rear = of the church... a very long way from where the organ console is...there = is a HUGH time delay, so I am typically a full beat ahead of what I hear = them singing...it takes time for the sound to travel out, time for them to = respond, and time for their singing to reach my ears, If I were to play = what I hear them singing, we would never get to a 4th verse, we would have = ground to a halt before then!!! <BR> <BR>hope this helps <BR> <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_46.33810d5b.2b4b934f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: hymns From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 18:32:37 -0800   What I've heard again and again over the past two weeks while I've been out sick is that my substitute (a very nice lady who knows how to play High Mass, and who probably plays more right notes than I) FOLLOWS, rather than LEADS.   Even the rector, who's not given to compliments, said, "YOU pick us up by the scruff of the neck and say, 'DO it, and do it NOW' ... she waits to see if anybody's going to join in." That applies more to the service music, but the same principle applies to hymns.   (1) Don't introduce hymns on a wimpy combination.I usually play the intro on Full Swell to Mixture with the Oboe.   (2) Set your tempo in the intro, and stick to it. No matter what.   (3) ALL repeated notes 1/2 value; if they drag, all CHORDS 1/2 value.   (4) DON'T tie repeated pedal notes. Play the pedal marcato.   (5) Leave off manual doubles and big hooty Open Woods and fat flutes, etc.   (6) If you can't get enough sound and/or brightness, play up an octave, either with the subs, or, if absolutely necessary on an all-8' romantic organ, with the subs AND the supers. Sometimes on that type of American organ, a keen Viole d'Orchestra will give the bite you need.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Please read , ALL canadian Pipe Organ Builders From: "danielwh1" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 00:32:58 -0400   I am trying to find out how to insure a Home Pipe Organ My Insurance company"Will NOT" under any circumstances even think of insuring my Instrument, they have not come to look at it, Al lthey say A "Pipe Organ" is not considered normal household content , therefor they will not = insure it under our home policy. We tryed to even insure it at a minimum amount of what it would cost to replace of an equivilent value from the Organ Clearing House. , Later in the day they replied to us via the phone, that they reviewed our Policy = and there guidelines, and still said No We have never ever put a claim into thsi insurance company.so I do not think we are a Risk I dont want to lose what I have, I just would like to feel like I have = some security in the event that I would ever lose it.   Does anyone know of what I would need to do? I need a good insurance company How do the churches insure there Pipe Organs in Canada, and also some of you may have build instruments for Private Residences, thank you Please reply Privatly thanks danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.435 / Virus Database: 244 - Release Date: 31/12/2002