PipeChat Digest #3364 - Thursday, January 9, 2003
 
Organs in SA (was Introduction)
  by "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com>
Re: Netherlands/Dutch/Hollander
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Netherlands/Dutch/Hollander
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Dutch - Deutsch
  by "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at>
Re: Organs in SA (was Introduction)
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Symphony Hall Organ
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Re: Symphony Hall Organ
  by <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
RE: Organs in SA (was Introduction)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Pipe Chamber Paint
  by "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com>
Re: Pipe Chamber Paint
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
 

(back) Subject: Organs in SA (was Introduction) From: "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 12:12:10 +0200   Hi,   You guys are rather sharp:-)   The languages are variously Zulu, Sesotho (Although the words would be almost identical in Setswana in this case), Afrikaans and of course = Colonial English...   The organs in SA. Well a brief history follows together with some details.   The Dutch landed in 1652 Nothing happened for about 50 years, partly due to the conditions at the Cape, and partly due to the Reformation in Europe.   The very first builder arrived in 1735 from Eisleben and promptly started building the first organ. After this initial job there was a brief flurry = of activity:   The individuals active during this period were all organ builders by = trade, except for Pentz and Leopold, being:   Johann Jacob Poosen (or Posse) from Eisleben (active 1735 - no mention = after 1737) Stephanus Baier (or Bauer) from Germany(?) (active 1752-1754 - no mention after 1754) Gregorius Pentz (1778 - erected organ in Lutheran Church) Johannes Ludewig Hodderson from Oldenburg (active 1779-1809 - no mention after 1809) Joachem Pieter Leopold (active 1788-1793 - Maintained the organ(s) in the Groote Kerk, and assisted Hodderson at the Lutheran Church) In 1795 the English annexed the Cape for the first time. Between then and 1803 there was no activity.   After 1806 (second Annexure) the picture changed dramatically. Numerous organs came from England and Europe. All the "biggies" in the Town Halls = and Cathedrals are from this age. There was no local building.   In the 20th century the local firms started taking the prominent positions in the trade and local work became the majority of the output. This period sees some very good work, but also some of the worst work in the country's history.   Herewith a brief list of the most notable instruments:   Cape Town - St George's Cathedral 1909 Hill & Son P/IV 52 Stops Cape Town - Town Hall 1905 Norman & Beard P/IV 51 Stops Cape Town - Coates Residence 1848 JW Walker P/I 8 Stops Grahamstown - Wesleyan Church c1835 Wm Hill P/I 8 Stops Port Elizabeth - Feathermarket Hall 2000 "Bits" P/IV 87 Stops Durban - City Hall 2003 Byrne P/IV 90 Stops Pietermaritzburg - City Hall 1902 Brindley & Foster P/IV 50 odd stops Johannesburg - "Irene" Church 1972 Fehrle P/III 35 Stops Johannesburg - City Hall 1906 Norman & Beard P/IV(VI) 97 Stops Johannesburg - St Mary's Cathedral 1929 Rushworth & Dreaper 51 Stops Pretoria - UNISA 1995 Rieger P/III 50 odd stops Pretoria - Viljoen Residence 1988 Robson P/II 10 stops Pretoria - City Hall 1935 Kimball P/IV(V) 90 Stops or so (Zimbabwe) Harare - Sacred Heart Cathedral 1928 Casavant P/II 14 or so = Stops   There are certainly others, but my mind is not recalling them.   The notable ones include two US jobs, the Kimball and the Casavant, both being the only examples in Africa.   Questions welcome.     Dave S             -----Original Message----- From: TommyLee Whitlock [mailto:tommylee@whitlock.org] Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2003 2:02 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Introduction     > On 1/8/03 3:36 AM, "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com> wrote: > > > Hi, > > Not necessarily:-) > > > > Sawubona, wamukelekile e amaList! > > Dumela, wenkelekile amaLista ba mo! > > Goeiedag, Welkom te die List! > > And finally > > Hello, Welcome to the List. (for those who don't get all of this - snigger > > snigger) > > > > Dave S > > > Zulu, Swahili, and Afrikaans? (Gotta beat TommyLee to this!) >   Alan I cheated. :) I believe you're correct with 1 & 3 but I believe the 2nd one is Setswana, the primary language of Botswana. Thanks for the challenge, David! Would you care to enlighten us now?   Now David, to bring this back on topic and tell us a little more about organs in South Africa while you're at it?   Ke itumetse Rra   Cheers, TommyLee     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Netherlands/Dutch/Hollander From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 07:20:36 -0800   >On 1/7/03 8:01 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > > > Now, about the Dutch!On a much less entertaining level, what is >it with the Dutch having three >names for who they are: Netherlands (Nederlander?), Holland, and Dutch? >The words seem to have no relationship to one another. much of it goes back to history: (well over 2,000 years) At one time Holland, Belgium and Germany were all one piece, the boundaries and principalities changed through out the course of history. The dutch language is a German derivative: "Deutsch" =3D German. I'm sure you can see where the "Dutch" came from, especially since "Dutch" is an anglo term, most likely a bastardization of the early "Deutsch" BTW Pennsylvania Dutch have nothing to do with Holland!! That is a German sect. more cause for confusion. Netherland and Holland are both similar terms and really refer to the geographically "lower"(below sealevel) territory. Derived from "Hollow" and "Nether", where I am sure you can see the geographical connotation. "Dutch" absorbed much of the neighboring languages: Danish, British, Gaelic, German -of-course, French, Yiddish, and bits originating from the busy East and West Indies trade routes. Confusing? No? ;-)   so Holland really refers to that part of the waterlogged real estate, but transcends to the rest of the current higher territory as well. The Netherlands - another collective term basically meaning the same thing.   so that's why most business in Holland is done in English!! LOL   John V   Living high and dry on a hill in the USA (and feeling nostalgic)    
(back) Subject: Re: Netherlands/Dutch/Hollander From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 07:30:42 -0800   > > >In any event, the place is flat and boring except in >the Ardennes (note the French)   The Ardennnes are part of Belgium , NOT Holland....   "boring" with more significant pipe organs and museums per square mile? culturally in the foreground? where you could spend a month in Amsterdam and still not have seen all??     >They even call canals "Dykes". No "Dikes" which is the earth berm used to hold back water. A Canal is a dug channel used to drain the water   > >If you ask me, the Netherlands is all "Oranges" and >"Lemmens".     The "House of Orange" refers to the royal family.   please explain "Lemmens"   Now.... since I note "UK" shall we start on that? now there's fertile territory.. ;-)   John V (and that is "Johannes" to you sir.. sorry I ever anglicized it)  
(back) Subject: Dutch - Deutsch From: "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 13:53:08 +0100   Hi People,   concerning the Dutch - Deutsch topic.   "dutch" and "deutsch" (german) do have the same root (dutsch) and it seem= s=20 that - at some time LOOONG ago, the word was used for Dutch and German. I= =20 guess, a few years before or after William conquered England a Dutch=20 fisherboat was landed on the British coast, and when asking in the next p= ub=20 for directions, the pubkeeper replied "Hey, what language are you talking= ?"=20 and they said "dutsch" - well, it stuck.   An interesting sidenote: The Pennsylvania "dutch" is actually - you guess= it -=20 German. Probably the same mechanism as above.     --=20 DI Thomas Mohr Institute of Cancer Research - Vienna University Borschkegasse 8a A-1090 Vienna Austria Tel ++43 (1) 4277 65160 Fax ++43 (1) 4277 65196  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in SA (was Introduction) From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 08:56:31 -0500   > The organs in SA. Well a brief history follows together with some = details. >   Excellent sketch of the history of organ building in South Africa! Only = one small quibble, though. Our Canadian friends might take offense at having = the Casavant referred to as a US installation, unless it was obtained from the =   Organ Clearing House. ;)   Are any of the of 18th century installations extant today?   Thanks! TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Symphony Hall Organ From: "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 09 Jan 2003 10:12:48 -0500   If anyone is interested I have scanned the Boston Globe article on the restoration of the organ (its short) into a jpeg file and will email to anyone interested. Please email me privately. I will not respond to open requests.   Cheers, Mack      
(back) Subject: Re: Symphony Hall Organ From: <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 10:29:06 -0500   Here is the text of the article:   AT THE BSO, AN OLD ORGAN GETS NEW LIFE Author(s): Richard Dyer, Globe Staff Date: January 8, 2003 Page: C5 = Section: Arts   The Boston Symphony Orchestra will restore and rebuild its famous = Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ, which has fallen into disrepair in the 53 = years since it was installed.   The firm of Foley-Baker Inc. of Tolland, Conn., will undertake the work, = which is expected to cost $3 million, including an endowment for the = future upkeep of the instrument. An anonymous donor has contributed a $1.5 = million matching gift so the work can begin. On Sunday, major sections of = the instrument will be removed from Symphony Hall and taken to Connecticut = for reconditioning. Reinstallation begins next summer. Registration and = tuning will take place in the summer of 2003; if all goes well, the = instrument will be rededicated in the fall of 2004, coinciding with the = arrival of James Levine as music director.   Plans call for a new three- manual console that will offer a better = sightline to the podium, and five stops that were part of the original = design but never installed will be built.   The organ was created in 1949 under the direction of the famous builder = and designer G. Donald Harrison, and it incorporated elements of the = original organ built for Symphony Hall by George Hutchings in 1900. The = instrument contains 59 voices, 80 ranks, and more than 4,500 pipes. = Legendary organist E. Power Biggs played the dedication concert Oct. 7, = 1949; music director Charles Munch led him and the orchestra in a Handel = concerto.   Organist James David Christie, who has played the Symphony Hall instrument = for more than two decades and who performed the last solo recital on it = back in 1984, describes it as "dilapidated."   "E. Power Biggs told me that everyone was unhappy about the instrument = from the time of the first concert, so various efforts were made to = improve it over the years, and it ended up as a patchwork quilt," he says. = "Now whole sections of the organ are disconnected, and it is full of dead = notes. A performer needs to find ways to work around the things that don't = function."   Supervising the rebuilding process is orchestra manager Ray Wellbaum. "The = organ was never kept up . . . and there are only so many Band-Aids that = you can put on it," he says. "Jim Christie and others have kept us from = some very embarrassing moments. Now we have a wonderful firm working for = us, and organ consultants Jack Bethards in San Francisco and acoustical = consultant Acentech in Cambridge. We had hoped to incorporate this project = as part of our larger master plan for the entire building. That project = has been postponed because of the state of the economy, but we are moving = forward on the organ because it's a musical necessity."   > > From: mack02445 <mack02445@mindspring.com> > Date: 2003/01/09 Thu AM 10:12:48 EST > To: Pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org>, piporg-l > <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> > Subject: Symphony Hall Organ > > If anyone is interested I have scanned the Boston Globe article on the > restoration of the organ (its short) into a jpeg file and will email to > anyone interested. Please email me privately. I will not respond to > open requests. > > Cheers, > Mack > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Organs in SA (was Introduction) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 10:08:30 -0600   A Casavant from the US? Granted, there were some such....   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: David Smit [mailto:DavidS@astrolabegroup.com]=20 Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2003 4:12 AM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: Organs in SA (was Introduction)   Hi,   You guys are rather sharp:-)   The languages are variously Zulu, Sesotho (Although the words would be almost identical in Setswana in this case), Afrikaans and of course Colonial English...   The organs in SA. Well a brief history follows together with some details.   The Dutch landed in 1652 Nothing happened for about 50 years, partly due to the conditions at the Cape, and partly due to the Reformation in Europe.   The very first builder arrived in 1735 from Eisleben and promptly started building the first organ. After this initial job there was a brief flurry of activity:   The individuals active during this period were all organ builders by trade, except for Pentz and Leopold, being:=20   Johann Jacob Poosen (or Posse) from Eisleben (active 1735 - no mention after 1737)=20 Stephanus Baier (or Bauer) from Germany(?) (active 1752-1754 - no mention after 1754)=20 Gregorius Pentz (1778 - erected organ in Lutheran Church)=20 Johannes Ludewig Hodderson from Oldenburg (active 1779-1809 - no mention after 1809)=20 Joachem Pieter Leopold (active 1788-1793 - Maintained the organ(s) in the Groote Kerk, and assisted Hodderson at the Lutheran Church)=20 =20 In 1795 the English annexed the Cape for the first time. Between then and 1803 there was no activity.   After 1806 (second Annexure) the picture changed dramatically. Numerous organs came from England and Europe. All the "biggies" in the Town Halls and Cathedrals are from this age. There was no local building.   In the 20th century the local firms started taking the prominent positions in the trade and local work became the majority of the output. This period sees some very good work, but also some of the worst work in the country's history.   Herewith a brief list of the most notable instruments:   Cape Town - St George's Cathedral 1909 Hill & Son P/IV 52 Stops Cape Town - Town Hall 1905 Norman & Beard P/IV 51 Stops Cape Town - Coates Residence 1848 JW Walker P/I 8 Stops Grahamstown - Wesleyan Church c1835 Wm Hill P/I 8 Stops Port Elizabeth - Feathermarket Hall 2000 "Bits" P/IV 87 Stops Durban - City Hall 2003 Byrne P/IV 90 Stops Pietermaritzburg - City Hall 1902 Brindley & Foster P/IV 50 odd stops Johannesburg - "Irene" Church 1972 Fehrle P/III 35 Stops Johannesburg - City Hall 1906 Norman & Beard P/IV(VI) 97 Stops Johannesburg - St Mary's Cathedral 1929 Rushworth & Dreaper 51 Stops Pretoria - UNISA 1995 Rieger P/III 50 odd stops Pretoria - Viljoen Residence 1988 Robson P/II 10 stops Pretoria - City Hall 1935 Kimball P/IV(V) 90 Stops or so (Zimbabwe) Harare - Sacred Heart Cathedral 1928 Casavant P/II 14 or so Stops   There are certainly others, but my mind is not recalling them.   The notable ones include two US jobs, the Kimball and the Casavant, both being the only examples in Africa.   Questions welcome.     Dave S       =20       -----Original Message----- From: TommyLee Whitlock [mailto:tommylee@whitlock.org] Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2003 2:02 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Introduction     > On 1/8/03 3:36 AM, "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com> wrote: >=20 > > Hi, > > Not necessarily:-) > >=20 > > Sawubona, wamukelekile e amaList! > > Dumela, wenkelekile amaLista ba mo! > > Goeiedag, Welkom te die List! > > And finally > > Hello, Welcome to the List. (for those who don't get all of this - snigger > > snigger) > >=20 > > Dave S > >=20 > Zulu, Swahili, and Afrikaans? (Gotta beat TommyLee to this!) >=20   Alan I cheated. :) I believe you're correct with 1 & 3 but I believe the 2nd one=20 is Setswana, the primary language of Botswana. Thanks for the challenge,=20 David! Would you care to enlighten us now? =20   Now David, to bring this back on topic and tell us a little more about organs=20 in South Africa while you're at it? =20   Ke itumetse Rra=20   Cheers, TommyLee=20     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Pipe Chamber Paint From: "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 08:17:14 -0800   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0001_01C2B7B7.84EF7920 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   A church that I play for occasionally wants to cut the sound bleeding from the back of the pipe chamber into the rooms behind it. I convinced them to hold off stuffing the chamber with insulation until I can come up with a better solution. I recall hearing about some special paint that should be used inside of the pipe chambers such that the walls are completely sealed. The guys at the local paint stores were not helpful - even the auto paint store. Does anyone have any info that they can pass along?     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0001_01C2B7B7.84EF7920 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <html>   <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii">     <meta name=3D3DGenerator content=3D3D"Microsoft Word 10 (filtered)">   <style> <!-- /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline;} span.EmailStyle17 {font-family:Arial; color:windowtext;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>   </head>   <body lang=3D3DEN-US link=3D3Dblue vlink=3D3Dpurple>   <div class=3D3DSection1>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>A church that I play for occasionally wants to cut =3D the sound bleeding from the back of the pipe chamber into the rooms behind it. I convinced them to hold off stuffing the chamber with insulation until I = =3D can come up with a better solution. I recall hearing about some special =3D paint that should be used inside of the pipe chambers such that the walls are =3D completely sealed. &nbsp;The guys at the local paint stores were not helpful =3D &#8211; even the auto paint store.&nbsp; Does anyone have any info that they can pass along?&nbsp; </span></font></p>   </div>   </body>   </html>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0001_01C2B7B7.84EF7920--    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Chamber Paint From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Thu, 09 Jan 2003 10:29:37 -0600   > A church that I play for occasionally wants to cut the sound bleeding = from the back of the pipe chamber into the rooms behind it. I > convinced them to hold off stuffing the chamber with insulation until I = can come up with a better solution. I recall hearing about some > special paint that should be used inside of the pipe chambers such that = the walls are completely sealed.   I'm not aware that any paint, in and of itself, is going to stop noise transmission. The church is on the right track with insulation, but by the same token, it will suck up the sound of the organ and ruin it. The only way this will work and stop "noise bleed" is to put the insulation INSIDE of the walls. Since organs are generally built "wall to wall" and have Sky Racks and such attached to the outside walls, the church is prolly MUCH better off constructing "false walls" on the Classroom side of the wall and stuffing THAT with insulation. If they leave an air gap between the original wall and the false wall, that will help acoustically de-couple the sound even more.   Hope these ideas help.   Faithfully,   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL