PipeChat Digest #3374 - Monday, January 13, 2003
 
Noel Goemanne (cross posted)
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
First Organ Recital
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Noel Goemanne (cross posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Never the twain shall meet
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: more on funerals
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Christmas disappeared...
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Speaking of funerals...
  by "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com>
funeral repertoire
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: First Organ Recital
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Elgar and Franck
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Speaking of funerals...
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Speaking of funerals...
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Re: Elgar and Franck
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Trinity English Lutheran Church
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: funeral repertoire
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Fanfare for a Son-of-an-Organbuilder
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Never the twain shall meet
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: funeral repertoire
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Noel Goemanne (cross posted) From: <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 08:49:16 EST     --part1_73.2bf00622.2b541ddc_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I am searching for a lead on the "Songs from the Book of Revelation" for chorus and organ by Noel Goemanne. Anyone familiar with this piece? Thanks and Regards Dick Siegel     --part1_73.2bf00622.2b541ddc_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I am searching for a lead on the "Songs from the = Book of Revelation" for chorus and organ by Noel Goemanne.&nbsp; Anyone = familiar with this piece?<BR> Thanks and Regards<BR> Dick Siegel<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_73.2bf00622.2b541ddc_boundary--  
(back) Subject: First Organ Recital From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 08:59:59 -0500   List,   It seems really strange, but, if y'all can believe me, I attended my first = real pipe organ recital ever last night - I'm presently 44 years old. = When I was around 12, the church I attended had a 2 manual pipe organ upon = which some modifications had been performed. Our organist gave a program = one Sunday night after the work was completed.   The only other organ recital I've attended was a Virgil Fox concert on his = traveling Rodgers Organ back in 1975.   I guess my pipe organ hobby/passion has really been a fantasy/hobby = existing only in my mind all these years. I've read books about = organbuilding, designed them on paper and in my head, and dreamed of = having one some day (which I finally have awaiting reassembly). Perhaps = it never occured to me that there were organs around me that I could go = hear and, possibly play. I've just never (since age 14) been in a church = that had one.   Anyway, I attended the recital of the huge Mander organ at Peachtree Road = UMC in Atlanta last night. Olivier Latry of Notre Dame de Paris (like my = French) was the artist. He was funny. He commented that he was a = Frenchman invited to the U.S. to play German organ music on a British = organ.   I'm sure there will be others on this list who attended and will post = their comments. If not, I will be glad to give my perspective.   Needless to say, the music was beautiful. The organ was absolutely = beautiful. I was able to experience the effect of the "French Swell". = After the recital, I was able to go to the back of the main case and look = at the mechanism - having communicated with Mr. Wechsler beforehand. I = met John Mander and had a very brief conversation.   The entire crew from London attended as well. One cannot judge a book by = its cover..... As I was trying to locate Mr. Wechsler, I asked one of the = British young men with very thick long hair what he did. Expecting him to = tell me that he had hauled in crates, he said, "I did the voicing".   Anyway, I'm afraid I'm going to have a problem appreciating subsequent = organ recitals having had this experience as a first. Well, I've got = patients in exam rooms waiting for me, so i'd better get to work.   Sincerely, Keith  
(back) Subject: Re: Noel Goemanne (cross posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 08:02:41 -0800   Someone just told me recently that Goemanne is still organist at Christ the King RC Church on Preston Road in Dallas (where he followed me in the 1970s) ... perhaps the church has a website.   Cheers,   Bud   RSiegel920@aol.com wrote: > > I am searching for a lead on the "Songs from the Book of Revelation" > for chorus and organ by Noel Goemanne. Anyone familiar with this > piece? > Thanks and Regards > Dick Siegel    
(back) Subject: Never the twain shall meet From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 19:58:17 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   That's a bit uncanny!   Not only do originate from the same Scottish clan as Mark Twain, I visited the Twain family house and felt so "at home" there.....I just wanted to move in.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   TommyLee Whitlock wrote:   The American writer Mark Twain (Samuel Clemmens) > expressed the exact same > sentiment some 120 years ago. <G!> >   >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: more on funerals From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 15:38:26 -0500   Bud writes:   > aside from Christmas and Easter, funerals are THE opportunity for > witness and outreach to the unchurched. Again and again, we've a > church-full of mostly non-Anglicans at a funeral, who were positively > AWED by what they experienced....   > it behooves us to ALWAYS do our best, and represent to the world EXACTLY > who we are, and what we stand for.   As at least one critic pointed out, Princess Diana's funeral was deficient and an opportunity sadly missed in this regard. It was estimated that the virtual "attendance" of this single service by people the world over exceeded the grand total attendance in the whole Church of England for years. The liturgy should have presented the church's doctrine on everlasting life and would have blessed its audience by so doing. It signally failed to do so in a depressing loss of nerve. One can't particularly fault the music, which I thought was splendid, but after a promising start the order of worship became increasingly amorphous and quasi-improvisatory (like the C of E itself nowadays).   I have heard that for the family, this Westminster Abbey extraganza was = not the real funeral-- which was held in more private conditions *and* was considerably more traditional in content.   Share your rector's distaste for eulogizing. Please don't anyone try to eulogize me when I'm gone. Just play Bach and Howells, sing the Durufle mass, and swing lots of incense... I'll need it.   Paul          
(back) Subject: RE: Christmas disappeared... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 15:53:07 -0500   > the folks in charge decided the Christmas > Eve theme would be The Three Kings   A legend understandably promoted by medieval royalty, complete with their alleged bones in a reliquary in Cologne Cathedral for the edification of millions of pilgrims. (It's still there, a gleaming golden case behind = the high altar).   The scriptures, however, say nothing about their being either kings or three.   But I'll take the image over one clergylady's politically correct term, = "the three wise people."   Paul    
(back) Subject: Speaking of funerals... From: "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 1 Jan 2000 00:22:14 -0500   Hey gang,   I've noticed so much discussion on funerals in the past week or so that I couldn't help but wonder: out of your entire "funeral repertoire", what = are your favorite pieces?   Jim Clouser BM candidate, Cleveland Institute of Music Music Director/Organist Reformation Lutheran Church Eastlake, Ohio     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2003 11:09 PM Subject: Re: Funerals     > Justin Karch wrote: > > > BUT I'm putting this request that for my funeral the entire Brahms > Requiem > > be performed. That's all I would even need. > > When I was a young silly thing of 22 (as opposed to being the silly old > thing I am now), fairly newly arrived in New York, I invited a few > friends to my apartment in Brooklyn Heights for dinner. I managed to > get myself so completely inebriated on bourbon that I proceeded > (according to stories I heard about later) to sing the entire Brahms > Requiem as an unaccompanied solo with score in hand. My guests > finished cooking their dinner and serving it. I don't remember much > about it. Nevertheless, I would be available for your funeral at > reasonable rates for a repeat performance. $25 and a bottle of Knob > Creek should do nicely, and I wouldn't need an accompanist. Ah, the > old days. > > Ken > > > > > > > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Kenneth Potter, Organist/Director of Music > St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square, Bronx, NY > 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, > Austin Op. 2097 at: http://www.nycago.org/Organs/html/StPetersEpBronx.html > = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > __________________________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. > http://mailplus.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: funeral repertoire From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 15:19:16 -0800   Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring - Bach Sheep May Safely Graze - Bach Before Thy Throne - Bach Pastorale (3rd movement) - Bach God's Time Is Best - Bach When In The Hour of Utmost Need - Bach Out of the Deep - Bach (double pedal) We All Believe In One True God - Bach By the Waters of Babylon - Bach Largo (New World Symphony) - Dvorak Dead March from Saul - Handel Requiem Aeternam - Titcomb In Paradisum - Faure/Dupre   Cheers,   Bud     Jim Clouser wrote: > > Hey gang, > > I've noticed so much discussion on funerals in the past week or so that = I > couldn't help but wonder: out of your entire "funeral repertoire", what = are > your favorite pieces? > > Jim Clouser > BM candidate, Cleveland Institute of Music > Music Director/Organist > Reformation Lutheran Church > Eastlake, Ohio > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2003 11:09 PM > Subject: Re: Funerals > > > Justin Karch wrote: > > > > > BUT I'm putting this request that for my funeral the entire Brahms > > Requiem > > > be performed. That's all I would even need. > > > > When I was a young silly thing of 22 (as opposed to being the silly = old > > thing I am now), fairly newly arrived in New York, I invited a few > > friends to my apartment in Brooklyn Heights for dinner. I managed to > > get myself so completely inebriated on bourbon that I proceeded > > (according to stories I heard about later) to sing the entire Brahms > > Requiem as an unaccompanied solo with score in hand. My guests > > finished cooking their dinner and serving it. I don't remember much > > about it. Nevertheless, I would be available for your funeral at > > reasonable rates for a repeat performance. $25 and a bottle of Knob > > Creek should do nicely, and I wouldn't need an accompanist. Ah, the > > old days. > > > > Ken > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > Kenneth Potter, Organist/Director of Music > > St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square, Bronx, NY > > 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, > > Austin Op. 2097 at: > http://www.nycago.org/Organs/html/StPetersEpBronx.html > > = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > > > __________________________________________________ > > Do you Yahoo!? > > Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. > > http://mailplus.yahoo.com > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: First Organ Recital From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 17:50:37 -0600   Impressive, huh? I told you.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Kzimmer0817@aol.com   Needless to say, the music was beautiful. The organ was absolutely beautiful. I was able to experience the effect of the "French Swell". After the recital, I was able to go to the back of the main case and look at the mechanism - having communicated with Mr. Wechsler beforehand. I met John Mander and had a very brief conversation.   Anyway, I'm afraid I'm going to have a problem appreciating subsequent organ recitals having had this experience as a first. Well, I've got patients in exam rooms waiting for me, so i'd better get to work.          
(back) Subject: Elgar and Franck From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 17:55:21 -0600   Does anyone on the list play the Vesper Voluntaries or L'Organiste for occasional service music nowadays?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: Speaking of funerals... From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 18:06:07 -0600   How about:   Cortege et Litanie - Dupre Master Tallis's Testament - Howells From an old French air and Dolcezza, from 3 Reflections for Organ - Percy Whitlock When I can read my title clear - arr. Dale Wood Clair de lune - either Debussy or Vierne Pavane for a dead princess - Ravel You can't always get what you want - Rolling Stones   for funerals, to name a few?   Sincerely (from the woman who debuted "Send in the Clowns" for the seating of the mothers-in-law at weddings),   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Jim Clouser   I've noticed so much discussion on funerals in the past week or so that I couldn't help but wonder: out of your entire "funeral repertoire", what are your favorite pieces?        
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of funerals... From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 18:23:55 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 13, 2003 6:06 PM Subject: RE: Speaking of funerals...     But I did it at a funeral!!! MWM   Glenda wrote: > Sincerely (from the woman who debuted "Send in the Clowns" for the > seating of the mothers-in-law at weddings),      
(back) Subject: Re: Elgar and Franck From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 16:44:40 -0800   All the time (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Glenda wrote: > > Does anyone on the list play the Vesper Voluntaries or L'Organiste for > occasional service music nowadays? > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Trinity English Lutheran Church From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 19:42:17 -0500   I will travel a bit next Sunday (if the weather permits) to hear Felix Hell give a performance at the subject church in Fort Wayne Indiana. After hearing Felix play 6 times last year, I would gladly travel any reasonable distance to hear him play again, and I wouldn't really mind if he was playing a calliope or a Mander, such is my attraction to any Felix Hell performance. Imagine my delight to learn that TELC has an enormous 4 man. =C6olian Organ that had major additions and tonal finishing by The =C6olian-Skinner Organ Company in 1968. Apparently the organ is nicely spread out in the big domed sanctuary with a Positiv Division high up on the wall opposite the console, and a large trumpet mounted clear up in the top of the dome. My friend and fellow list member Keith Morgan worked on this organ in 1968 as a tonal finisher for The =C6olian-Skinner Company, and he says this is an exciting instrument in a resonant space. Does anyone have any up to date information about this organ? I visited the TELC website, but most of it was still under construction, and no mention of the organ appeared. It would be interesting to read a specification and perhaps to learn a bit of its history since 1968. Thanks in advance Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Re: funeral repertoire From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 19:52:42 -0500   most of the Brahms chorale preludes   the slow movements from the Mendelssohn sonatas   any number of Bach chorale preludes, the larger ones as well as many from = the Orgelbu"chlein. (my very favorite is the ornamented Nun komm, der = Heiden Heiland); also arrangements from instrumental sonatas, such as the = sarabande from a cello sonata that I am sure is familiar to most of you.   Elgar Nimrod from Enigma Variations and the fourth mvt. from Widor symph. = V if you have a large enough instrument   just what I can think of now   Merry   Merry Foxworth   =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   http://ibo.bww.com/foxworth password: foxy   http://www.geocities.com/pcfla33981/index.html   http://www.geocities.com/merryfoxworth/CapstoneRealtyBostonMA.html   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).            
(back) Subject: Fanfare for a Son-of-an-Organbuilder From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 20:57:48 -0500   Dear Lists and Friends,   I am just back from a remarkable weekend in Atlanta, which included a stupendous concert by Olivier Latry on the new, well-stuffed Mander at Peachtree United Methodist Church. I have written about the church, and = have written about the Organ. Anyone not aware of it yet can find it in detail at: < http://www.mander-organs.com/html/peachtree.html >   So, this is not about the church or the Organ. Rather, it is about people. = A few years ago, a wonderful <Festschrift>, a book of essays by great people in the world of the Organ, appeared in honor of Noel Mander, who founded = the Mander company in 1936. It was called by the lovely title, "Fanfare for an Organ Builder." Almost by definition, I cannot do a Festschrift on my own, but I do want to do a bit of an essay on Noel's son, John Pike Mander, now Managing Director of the Company. In addition to masterminding the amazing and beautiful Peachtree Road Organ, he pulled something off this weekend that some of those who work for the company will not soon forget, and I = hope you will not mind these thoughts - they are, after all, about those who = toil day after day making Pipes, Chests, Consoles, and everything else that = goes into the instrument we love.   When I finished up my undergraduate work in Organ, I had an idea that = there would be glamor and excitement in Organbuilding, and decided to call = around and find out who would be clever enough to consider hiring this young treasure full of Bach and Hindemith and lots of ideas about exactly how an Organ ought to sound. I first went to Papa Holtkamp, because he was close = at hand, and I knew him somewhat through my singing at St. Paul's, East Cleveland, the family church. I learned how well he knew *me* when he said in a most gentle way: "Malcolm, how about doing a two year tour of duty in the Army, and then come back and see me, and we will have something to = talk about." I wrote to a couple of other rather distant builders, but also = went down and visited Schantz in Orville. I thnk it was Bruce Schantz who said something like: "We really do not want people working for us who are interested Organs, at least in terms of having opinions about how they should be built. We need hard-working, steady people who will do the work, but have their interests in other areas - Little League, other athletic and/or social activities, family activities, etc. We are in this business because we love the instrument, and have ideas about how an Organ should sound and be made, and we really don't want people coming along to = interfere with our mission, or telling us we are doing it wrong. We know we are = doing it successfuly and in a way that pleases many, because we have been around for a long time." I think there is lots to explain and commend that attitude, but at the time, I was really mad. And so the search went - nowhere, and I decided instead on graduate work at The Juilliard in New York, where a friend and I ended up maintaining the practice Organs, such = as they were, and thus having a bit of both worlds.   Well, back to this past weekend. I know a lot of the people who work at Manders because many of them get a chance to come here to install instruments, and it is not always the same people. Those who purchase instruments from us are responsible for accommodating the installation = crew, but, as is the case with some European builders, we offer churches the chance to save that money by asking parishioners to house the crew at no charge. This has the benefit of establishing nice relationships between = the installers and church families. This was particularly the case at Chestnut Hill (Philadelphia), to the extent that when it came time for Peter = Sykes's splendid dedication recital, the host families got together and funded flights for all the men and, of course, accommodation in their homes. It = was a great gesture, and a good time was had by all, except, of course, by = those who had worked on the Organ long hours, but in the workshop only. So, when there was, I believe, talk of that possibly happening in Atlanta, an enormous instrument on which every single person in the works had to have had a hand, John Mander made the decision that all who wanted to come to Atlanta for the great occasion could do so at half fare (at this already very low fare season), and accommodation would be provided free in a good hotel. Well, I think the final tally was 18 - I believe I made 19 - and = what a great weekend it was! I arrived too late on Saturday for the tour of the facilities of CNN, which is well watched all over the world, and was too exhausted and inept to take part in what was, I am told, a rollicking pool tournament at "Buckhead Billiards," but for me, the best thing of all was meeting those few people whom I did not know, and getting to know better those I did. What I learned in the process is what this posting is about. = I heard from quite a few of the male and female Manderins that this was the first time they had been able to see and hear a finished Mander instrument at its dedication -or at all. And there were several who had never been to the U.S. before, and having had a very hospitable taste of it this time, = are keen to come again. Several Mander staff, long term or new, expressed = great interest now in finally coming back to see the great Organ at St. Ignatius Loyola in New York. That's one group I, and I know the people at St. Ignatius, will be most pleased to show that instrument to.   Well, there is a big ending to this, a very moving moment. Olivier Latry, being fully aware that there was a large contingent of the Organbuilders from the Mander works present in Atlanta for his recital, after receiving thunderous applause from a truly full house in response to his = performance, took to the microphone and asked the entire crew to come up front to be acknowledged. Is that a first? I don't know, but it was a wonderful = gesture on Olivier's part, and the audience reaction was very gratifying to everyone, to say the least. Many a moist eye was seen. So, fanfares to = John Mander for shepherding this complex project to a beautiful completion, of course to Music Director Scott Atcheson, Assistant Organist Michael Shake, Jr., to Don Harp, Senior Minister, the Donors of the Organ, and the entire church staff - and - to all the men and women from the works in Bethnal Green who, well, toiled is indeed the word, over every piece of this = immense instrument. It was great to see them get the recognition they truly = deserve, and we are all grateful in the extreme to John Mander for his great generosity of spirit and substance in causing this weekend-to-remember to take place!   And it never ceases. One of the men told me this morning that they have = now set to work, making 48 slider chests for the restoration of the majestic Albert Hall Organ! And there will be more before that great behemoth = speaks again!   Cheers to all,   Malcolm Wechsler - still coming down out of the clouds. In case you have forgotten: www.mander-organs.com              
(back) Subject: Re: Never the twain shall meet From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 20:31:53 -0600   Was that his house in Hartford, Connecticut (where he lived in later = life), or the one here in Missouri, at Hannibal (where he grew up)? = Incidentally, the player organ from the Hartford house is now in the Hannibal house; I'm not quite sure how this came about. You can also visit the Mark Twain = cave (as in Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, etc.) near Hannibal, where train = robber Jesse James once also hung out. Just a plug for Missouri tourism ...   John Speller, St. Mark's, St. Louis.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 13, 2003 1:58 PM Subject: Never the twain shall meet     > Hello, > > That's a bit uncanny! > > Not only do originate from the same Scottish clan as > Mark Twain, I visited the Twain family house and felt > so "at home" there.....I just wanted to move in. > > Regards, >      
(back) Subject: RE: funeral repertoire From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 21:38:02 -0500   I usually play the Easter chorales from the Orgelbuechlein and some of the Brahms chorale preludes. I never cared much for the latter in my youth, = but lately they have definitely grown on me.   For postludes: if I'm feeling ambitious and in good form, I might attempt Dupre's "Cortege et Litanie" which strikes me as an excellent funeral = piece even though he didn't have such an occasion in mind, did he (the title notwithstanding)? Personally, I think the Choral from the Suite by Alain = is also fitting, but it's strong stuff that one might not want to spring on a family unawares. Usually I play it safe with two more from the Orgelbuchlein, "Alle Menschen mussen sterben" and "Wer nur den lieben = Gott".