PipeChat Digest #3377 - Tuesday, January 14, 2003
 
Circling Turkey Buzzards (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Speaking of funerals . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Funeral Styles
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Rollins College
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Funeral Styles
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Funeral Styles
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Funeral Styles
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Speaking of funerals...
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Funeral Styles
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Turkey Buzzards and Taste
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
OFF TOPIC: Turkey Buzzards and Taste
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Of some Organ Builders [NOT ANYONE ON THIS LIST]
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Re: The Hallelujah Chorus is Satanic??  but there's more!!!
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Never the twain shall meet
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Turkey Buzzards and Taste
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Funeral Styles
  by "Gary A. Raish" <garfd@ptdprolog.net>
Re: funeral repertoire
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
 

(back) Subject: Circling Turkey Buzzards (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 16:46:16 -0800   I had my first request for "On Eagle's Wings" today. Not while there's breath in MY body (grin).   My reply to my sub-organist:   > Candace asked if it would be possible to use On Eagle=B9s Wings > (you know, the one you are so crazy about) as a vocal solo, or if I wou= ld > play it as part of the prelude for her wedding.   I have an obligation as the Organist/Choirmaster (and a faithful communicant) to obey the canon in the Prayer Book which forbids "light and unseemly music".   Therefore ... on MY watch, the playing, singing, whistling, humming, strumming, or playing of a recording of "On Eagle's Wings" (or reproduction by any other means or medium, including but not limited to kazoo or jug bands in the parking lot) is ABSOLUTELY FORBIDDEN before, during or after ANY service held in St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church. It's the camel's nose of CCM in the tent, and I won't be a party to it. I have NEVER permitted it; I will NOT play it.   But I won't BE there (grin).=20   If the RECTOR wants to permit it, that's up to HIM ... the canon gives him ULTIMATE charge of the music. I just don't want it to come back and haunt us as a possible precedent at some later time, particularly if someone (God FORBID!) should want it sung or played at SUNDAY Mass.   You might point out to the bride that it's a FUNERAL song in the RC church (grin).   On the other hand, if she wants a PROPER TEXT of Psalm 91 sung, she can have "He That Dwelleth In the Secret Place of the Most High" by James MacDermid. If you look in the bottom drawer of the tall metal file cabinet IN the organ loft (next to the sound desk), there should be two copies. If not, let me know, and I'll find it here at home. I just bought it again recently ... it had been out of print. Or, she can have Psalm 91 from the Prayer Book chanted by George. I think I have that in the computer.   More appropriate would be "Song of Ruth" by Gounod ("Entreat Me Not To Leave Thee") - that's probably still in one of my organist's notebooks, or in that bottom drawer. George should also have a copy in his notebook.   I'll also attach my settings of "O Perfect Love" (Charterhouse) and "Lord, Who At Cana's Wedding Feast" (Kingsfold) to this e-mail ... we usually sing one or the other when the bride and groom go into the chancel after the first part of the Marriage Service. They're about the right length. I don't think I have the accompaniment to "Lord, Who At Cana's Wedding Feast" in the computer, but "Kingsfold" is #331 in the Hymnal.   >=20 > Please let me know if you have rules about what can be played or sung. = I > usually play sacred and classical music for the prelude for weddings.   All TEXTS sung have to be from the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer, an approved Hymnal (the 1940, Hymns Ancient & Modern, The English Hymnal, Songs of Syon), the Missal, or the Breviary. By common consent, the words of Bach cantatas are approved. I permit that Twyla Paris anthem (Lamb of God) because it's PERCEIVED as a paraphrase of the Agnus Dei when sung in the context of the Mass. It also sounds like an English folk-song to ME (grin).   Other than that, no "light or unseemly music", which I take to mean nothing (other than Here Comes the Bride and There Goes the Bride, which we recently DID decide to permit) that's recognizably secular, or that will call to mind a secular or otherwise inappropriate image or event. In other words, NO "eat your strawberries and drink your sweet wine", Strauss waltzes, etc. (chuckle).=20   I usually play: Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring, Sheep May Safely Graze, Air in D (Bach), Cantilene Nuptiale (Dubois, 12 Pieces), selections from Messe de Marriage (Dubois ... that's in the metal filing cabinet under "D", a black spiral-bound book that's coming apart), I Am Black But Comely (Dupre - Antiphons), How Fair and Pleasant Art Thou (Dupre - Antiphons), Cantilena (Rheinberger), Andante in B Flat (Handel Organ Concerto in F), etc. ... anything in the Concordia Wedding Music books is OK.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: Speaking of funerals . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 19:05:03 -0600   If you play my funeral, play some REAL organ music, and play it well - I'll be the only one actually listening to you! And I'm one of the few that will probably pay well.   Thinking of all the free funerals I've done over the years,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Funeral Styles From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 19:10:36 -0600   Goodness! A funeral with all that must take a good hour if not more. In = 25 years as a minister, I have NEVER had a choir at a funeral--and only = rarely a duet instead of a soloist. It would be lovely to have a choir, but certainly rare. And my services seldom run over 20 minutes (which is fervently appreciated by most). However, this is a midwestern, non-liturgical tradition.   OTOH, rarely do we have church funerals anymore--they are almost always at the funeral home, which I find very sad for people who were active in the church.   Dennis Steckley __________________   Hmmm .... I'm a LITTLE confused ... are you saying that Anglican and Lutheran funerals AREN'T liturgical?   I'm organist/choirmaster in an Anglican church, and our funeral rites consist of:   (1) THE BURIAL OFFICE   Opening Sentences (chanted) - I am the Resurrection and the life, etc. Chanting of one to five Psalms The big long reading from 1 Corinthians 15:20FF Anthem - I heard a voice from heaven Collect - Remember thy servant ... First Blessing - Unto God's gracious mercy ...   (2) THE REQUIEM MASS (listing only the musical parts)   Introit - Requiem aeternam Kyrie - Requiem Mass      
(back) Subject: Rollins College From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 19:20:24 -0600   Does anyone know the stoplist of the organ at the Knowles Memorial Chapel at Rollins College?   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Styles From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 20:22:46 EST     --part1_4f.29be8005.2b5611e6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/14/2003 7:15:43 PM Central Standard Time, = kzrev@rr1.net writes:   > rarely do we have church funerals anymore--they are almost always at > the funeral home, which I find very sad for people who were active in = the > church. > My graduate organ professor said: "It is the duty of the = church to see the Christian soul from birth to death; the church is prostituting itself to leave funerals to the undertakers -- nothing against the undertakers!"   Dale G. Rider, MSM, CAGO Organist/Director of Music Ministries First Baptist Church /American Kansas City, Missouri Volunteer Staff Organist Community of Christ Auditorium & Temple Independence, Missouri   --part1_4f.29be8005.2b5611e6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 1/14/2003 7:15:43 = PM Central Standard Time, kzrev@rr1.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><B><I>rarely do we have = church funerals anymore--they are almost always at<BR> the funeral home, which I find very sad for people who were active in = the<BR> church.</B></I><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Times New Roman" = LANG=3D"0">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; My = graduate organ professor said:&nbsp; <I>"It is the duty of the church to = see the Christian soul from birth to death; the church is prostituting = itself to leave funerals to the undertakers -- nothing against the = undertakers!"</I><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0">Dale G. = Rider,&nbsp; </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D1 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" = LANG=3D"0"><I>MSM, CAGO<BR> Organist/Director of Music Ministries</I><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0"><B>First = Baptist Church</B> /American<BR> Kansas City, Missouri<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <I>Volunteer Staff = Organist</I><BR> <B><I>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </I>Community of = Christ</B> Auditorium &amp; Temple<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Independence, = Missouri</FONT></HTML>   --part1_4f.29be8005.2b5611e6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Styles From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 17:34:09 -0800   Our funerals typically take 1 - 1 1/4 hours, depending on how many people there are to receive Holy Communion. A full-to-standing-room-only church (which we often HAVE, both on Sundays AND at funerals) can take 1 1/2 hours ... but since we only marry and bury communicants, people know what to expect.   Funeral home funerals are forbidden in the Anglican Catholic Church. In extraordinary cases, the graveside Committal Service and burial can be done first at the cemetery (usually privately, at the family's request), and then the (public) Burial Office and Mass later at the church (usually on the same day).   Now that we have a permanent church building, the WAKES will probably be moved from the funeral home to the church as well. That's an old, OLD Anglican custom.   To quote from our funeral booklet:   "THE PARISH PRIEST is the 'funeral director'; call HIM before you make ANY arrangements."   Cheers,   Bud   "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" wrote: > > Goodness! A funeral with all that must take a good hour if not more. = In 25 > years as a minister, I have NEVER had a choir at a funeral--and only = rarely > a duet instead of a soloist. It would be lovely to have a choir, but > certainly rare. And my services seldom run over 20 minutes (which is > fervently appreciated by most). However, this is a midwestern, > non-liturgical tradition. > > OTOH, rarely do we have church funerals anymore--they are almost always = at > the funeral home, which I find very sad for people who were active in = the > church. > > Dennis Steckley > __________________ > > Hmmm .... I'm a LITTLE confused ... are you saying that Anglican and > Lutheran funerals AREN'T liturgical? > > I'm organist/choirmaster in an Anglican church, and our funeral rites > consist of: > > (1) THE BURIAL OFFICE > > Opening Sentences (chanted) - I am the Resurrection and the life, etc. > Chanting of one to five Psalms > The big long reading from 1 Corinthians 15:20FF > Anthem - I heard a voice from heaven > Collect - Remember thy servant ... > First Blessing - Unto God's gracious mercy ... > > (2) THE REQUIEM MASS (listing only the musical parts) > > Introit - Requiem aeternam > Kyrie - Requiem Mass > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Styles From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 21:04:09 -0500   On 1/14/03 8:10 PM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > Goodness! A funeral with all that must take a good hour if not more.   Yer in a hurry? Hey, it's the only time I get buried!   > In 25 > years as a minister, I have NEVER had a choir at a funeral--and only = rarely > a duet instead of a soloist. It would be lovely to have a choir, but > certainly rare.   If it "would be lovely," then why not, at least for a "special" funeral, HAVE IT? In 25 years, have you not had a funeral for a pastor, a bishop, = a terrific Christian layperson, a Christian musician, for whom you'd like to have "lovely" funeral? Having done it for THEM, do it for ANY Christian. This ain't the time for "ranking" Christians.   > And my services seldom run over 20 minutes (which is > fervently appreciated by most).   Must be nice to feel "appreciated."   > However, this is a midwestern, non-liturgical tradition.   Evidently. But I've had a good bit of funerals in the Dakotas, Wisconsin, etc., where we spent an hour or so at the food afterward, and it would = have seemed unseemly to spend only 20 minutes at the funeral itself. Funeral might easily run 45-65 minutes followed by more time in the churchyard burial, followed by an hour or so at food. Then home to milk the cows, = etc. I don't know that "liturgical" has much to do with it. > > OTOH, rarely do we have church funerals anymore--they are almost always = at > the funeral home, which I find very sad for people who were active in = the > church.   When I was a Midwestern pastor, I simply informed the so-called "funeral director(s)" that funerals would be held in the church. End of subject. Never had one anywhere else. Why would I? Appreciate (most of) your attitude; but stick by your guns. Let the Church be the Church. > Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of funerals... From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 20:02:56 -0600   ---- Original Message ----- From: <DudelK@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 3:33 PM Subject: Re: Speaking of funerals...     > I don't play funerals very often these days, but my favorites include:   > Handel: Dead March from Saul   If it was good enough for Queen Victoria it's good enough for me. <g>   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Styles From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 21:09:21 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3125423361_4586797 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 1/14/03 8:22 PM, "ProOrgo53@aol.com" <ProOrgo53@aol.com> wrote:   > My graduate organ professor said: "It is the duty of the church to see = t=3D he > Christian soul from birth to death; the church is prostituting itself to = =3D leave > funerals to the undertakers -- >=3D20 Dale: I=3DB9m totally with your grad prof. My first pastoral post was in = Nort=3D h Dakota, 1961. Never had any problem with the undertakers doing their job, just as I was doing mine.   Same in (urban) Maryland about ten years later.   A pastor should know his job and DO it.   Alan   --B_3125423361_4586797 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Funeral Styles</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 1/14/03 8:22 PM, = &quot;ProOrgo53@aol.com&qu=3D ot; &lt;ProOrgo53@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><FONT SIZE=3D3D"4">My = graduate =3D organ professor said: &nbsp;<I>&quot;It is the duty of the church to see = the=3D Christian soul from birth to death; the church is prostituting itself to = le=3D ave funerals to the undertakers --<BR> </I></FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><I><BR> </I>Dale: &nbsp;I&#8217;m totally with your grad prof. &nbsp;My first = pasto=3D ral post was in North Dakota, 1961. &nbsp;Never had any problem with the = und=3D ertakers doing their job, just as I was doing mine. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Same in (urban) Maryland about ten years later. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> A pastor should know his job and DO it.<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3125423361_4586797--    
(back) Subject: Turkey Buzzards and Taste From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 21:54:45 EST   How do people reach the age of marriage (and the age of death) and not =   only remain clueless, but expend huge amounts of time, energy, and effort = as proponents of bad taste? It is alarming that there is such an overflowing =   well of bad music being churned out that for some unholy reason is being "appreciated" and "cherished." It may be that with the total and willful collapse American education = and culture, in which silence, thought, and reading are replaced by loud vulgarity EVERYWHERE (every elevator, store, waiting room, and even = airplanes taxiing on the runway have pop music blasting), one noise is indistinguishable from another, and future generations remain ineducable. Any small attempt at maintaining standards is now viewed as "snobbery" =   and "elitism," right down to the "down-home" inability of our leadership = to form an English sentence. Mediocrity is now firmly and militantly = entrenched in American culture, leaving us by the wayside as laughingstocks. One = need only watch news broadcasts from anyplace else in the civilized world to = feel the shame of world opinion. The horror is that we're so damned proud of it.  
(back) Subject: OFF TOPIC: Turkey Buzzards and Taste From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 22:29:15 -0500   A serious, and hopeful answer may lie in the purpose of our list.   Who, in their right mind would build a real pipe organ? You can accomplish this without that much effort with a digital. Sounds better than they used to.. inversley to Seb Gluck Posts.   Fire me, and stop bitching about elevator conversations unless it involves stuff overheard on a Wurlitzer elevator lift.   ...What are you attempting to do in those elevators?   Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Of some Organ Builders [NOT ANYONE ON THIS LIST] From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 22:50:00 -0500   Phoneys in the pipe organ world have done much overpriced mischief in the loft.   Who are these frauds? Switching ranks between two churches and charging both for new pipework?   No one in this most August List has ever done any illegal stuff. A colorful thread involving these characters might brighten the week for the rest of us.   Stan     They are culturally well-veneered frauds. Get two sources for references and micro-manage their every action.   The 'Walking Pipes' is one of their scams.   NEVER let pipes leave the loft.    
(back) Subject: Re: The Hallelujah Chorus is Satanic?? but there's more!!! From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 23:05:36 EST     --part1_2f.3351778b.2b563810_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Drums are associated with praise and worship bands, too. Lee   --part1_2f.3351778b.2b563810_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D"#400040" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Drums are associated with = praise and worship bands, too.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_2f.3351778b.2b563810_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Never the twain shall meet From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 23:14:26 EST     --part1_86.249e0ffb.2b563a22_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Did you meet Gregory Peterson in Boston? He is the music = director/organist at Old South Church, Copley square. He was very kind to me and let me practice on the wonderful E.M. Skinner which had 4 full length 32's, a bourdon, violone, an open wood, and a bombarde . The 32' open wood was on =   the back wall along with a chamade rank...wow...it also had a separate = string division. Greg   --part1_86.249e0ffb.2b563a22_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Did you meet Gregory = Peterson in Boston? &nbsp;He is the music director/organist at Old South = Church, Copley square. &nbsp;He was very kind to me and let me practice on = the wonderful E.M. Skinner which had 4 full length 32's, a bourdon, = violone, an open wood, and a bombarde . &nbsp;The 32' open wood was on the = back wall along with a chamade rank...wow...it also had a separate string = division. <BR>Greg</FONT></HTML>   --part1_86.249e0ffb.2b563a22_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Turkey Buzzards and Taste From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 23:16:09 EST     --part1_4b.29596e76.2b563a89_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I agree 100%-it is also a phenomenon at colleges :( greg   --part1_4b.29596e76.2b563a89_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I agree 100%-it is also = a phenomenon at colleges :( <BR>greg</FONT></HTML>   --part1_4b.29596e76.2b563a89_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Styles From: "Gary A. Raish" <garfd@ptdprolog.net> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 23:37:18 -0500   As a funeral director & organist I have one comment about the priest being "funeral director" and contacting the church first.... Yes, I certainly agree that the family should make arrangements regarding the service with the clergy but PLEASE remember to include the funeral director in the = plans. Remember funeral directors also have schedules. It makes for major = problems when the family and clergy make all arrangements and then come and tell = the funeral director when the viewing & services will be. Remember we have other services also and we need to work our schedule so we have automotive equipment as well as help available. If the family, clergy and funeral directors work together it makes things much easier. So there you have my two cents in the conversation. Gary Raish ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 8:34 PM Subject: Re: Funeral Styles     > Our funerals typically take 1 - 1 1/4 hours, depending on how many > people there are to receive Holy Communion. A full-to-standing-room-only > church (which we often HAVE, both on Sundays AND at funerals) can take 1 > 1/2 hours ... but since we only marry and bury communicants, people know > what to expect. > > Funeral home funerals are forbidden in the Anglican Catholic Church. In > extraordinary cases, the graveside Committal Service and burial can be > done first at the cemetery (usually privately, at the family's request), > and then the (public) Burial Office and Mass later at the church > (usually on the same day). > > Now that we have a permanent church building, the WAKES will probably be > moved from the funeral home to the church as well. That's an old, OLD > Anglican custom. > > To quote from our funeral booklet: > > "THE PARISH PRIEST is the 'funeral director'; call HIM before you make > ANY arrangements." > > Cheers, > > Bud > > "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" wrote: > > > > Goodness! A funeral with all that must take a good hour if not more. In 25 > > years as a minister, I have NEVER had a choir at a funeral--and only rarely > > a duet instead of a soloist. It would be lovely to have a choir, but > > certainly rare. And my services seldom run over 20 minutes (which is > > fervently appreciated by most). However, this is a midwestern, > > non-liturgical tradition. > > > > OTOH, rarely do we have church funerals anymore--they are almost = always at > > the funeral home, which I find very sad for people who were active in the > > church. > > > > Dennis Steckley > > __________________ > > > > Hmmm .... I'm a LITTLE confused ... are you saying that Anglican and > > Lutheran funerals AREN'T liturgical? > > > > I'm organist/choirmaster in an Anglican church, and our funeral rites > > consist of: > > > > (1) THE BURIAL OFFICE > > > > Opening Sentences (chanted) - I am the Resurrection and the life, etc. > > Chanting of one to five Psalms > > The big long reading from 1 Corinthians 15:20FF > > Anthem - I heard a voice from heaven > > Collect - Remember thy servant ... > > First Blessing - Unto God's gracious mercy ... > > > > (2) THE REQUIEM MASS (listing only the musical parts) > > > > Introit - Requiem aeternam > > Kyrie - Requiem Mass > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: funeral repertoire From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 22:28:54 -0600   I'm not a organist, someone else can do it.   The 2 Norwegian tunes and Jesu, would be almost a "must play". It's hard to pick my favorites, there just to many.   Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring - Bach Sheep May Safely Graze - Bach Largo (New World Symphony) - Dvorak Come sweet death - Bach In Heav'n Above, In Heav'n above - Norwegian folk tune Behold the Host Arrayed in White - Norwegian folk tune Fairest Lord Jesus ( Beautiful Savior) Still, Still with Thee (when purple morning breaketh) He Leadeth Me (O blessed thought) Nearer, still Nearer.   I have pretty much told my family to have a organ concert and hymn sing when I pass, Not much sermon, let the hymns be the message. NO , no,,, I may be retired but,, I'm not ready to go yet, ;-)   Luther   >Jim Clouser wrote: >> >> Hey gang, >> >> I've noticed so much discussion on funerals in the past week or so that = I >> couldn't help but wonder: out of your entire "funeral repertoire", = what are >> your favorite pieces? >> >> Jim Clouser >> BM candidate, Cleveland Institute of Music >> Music Director/Organist >> Reformation Lutheran Church >> Eastlake, Ohio >> >