PipeChat Digest #3383 - Thursday, January 16, 2003
 
Re: Cameron Carpenter in Allentown PA
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Clueless (Was: Turkey Buzzards and bad Taste)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: Chest Releathering
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
On Turkey's Wings
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Casavant lever-arm and ventil chests
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Drive Throughs
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: From funerals to weddings
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Drive Throughs
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
American mediocrity
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Re: American mediocrity
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: Cameron Carpenter in Allentown PA
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: On Turkey's Wings
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: On Turkey's Wings
  by "Steven Frank" <steve@virgilfox.com>
Re: American mediocrity
  by "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org>
Re: From funerals to weddings
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: From funerals to weddings
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: From funerals to weddings
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: From funerals to weddings
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: From funerals to weddings
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: American mediocrity
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Cameron Carpenter in Allentown PA From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 07:16:32 EST     --part1_120.1c6c4fcc.2b57fca0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/15/2003 7:11:30 PM Central Standard Time, stepwill@enter.net writes:   > Cameron, 21, has > been hailed the youngest and most controversial of American touring > organists. His performances have received acclaim for his = interpretations > of > imposing repertoire and for his imaginative improvisations.   Hi, Y'all!   I'm just curious, but is this from Cameron's press release or is this = comment something the host organist/presenter printed? Is Cameron the youngest? = Ol' Felix has been on the circuit for quite a while. Most controversial? Well, =   now, that title could go to many, many, many organists, both female and = male.   Have a great day, y'all!   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea   --part1_120.1c6c4fcc.2b57fca0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 1/15/2003 7:11:30 PM = Central Standard Time, stepwill@enter.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Cameron, 21, has<BR> been hailed the youngest and most controversial of American touring<BR> organists. His performances have received acclaim for his interpretations = of<BR> imposing repertoire and for his imaginative improvisations. = </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0"><BR> Hi, Y'all!<BR> <BR> I'm just curious, but is this from Cameron's press release or is this = comment something the host organist/presenter printed? Is Cameron the = youngest? Ol' Felix has been on the circuit for quite a while. Most = controversial? Well, now, that title could go to many, many, many = organists, both female and male.<BR> <BR> Have a great day, y'all!<BR> <BR> Yours,<BR> <BR> Darryl by the Sea</FONT></HTML>   --part1_120.1c6c4fcc.2b57fca0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Clueless (Was: Turkey Buzzards and bad Taste) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 07:03:19 -0600   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > How do people reach the age of marriage (and the age of death) and = not > only remain clueless, but expend huge amounts of time, energy, and = effort as > proponents of bad taste?   What *I* want to know is how so many people can manage to GO THROUGH LIFE COMPLETELY CLUELESS ABOUT ANYTHING? Why aren't these people taken off the streets and disposed of somehow?   Perfect example: I sent an Invoice to a church with a post-it note attached to a small form that I needed to submit to a competitive pipe organ manufacturer for the reimbursement of a "warranty repair". In it, I asked them to sign it and return it, and even included a self-addressed, stamped envelope for their convenience.   Well, I received the check for the church's portion of the work in that SASE, but NO form. Upon calling the church, my secretary was told: "Oh, we thought that form was for US!"   DUH! Can't anyone READ anymore???   And so far as I recall, she wasn't a blonde, either, so THAT excuse is out. . .   Faithfully,   G.A.   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: RE: Chest Releathering From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 08:48:10 -0500       concerning early Casavant chests you wrote: .. It will contain lever balance arms operating the pouches and these are rather tricky to releather and adjust properly, I've releathered a fair number of Casavant chests as early as 1905 and = I've never seen any thing that resembles what you've described. The = distributors (primaries) and stop actions from the earlier Casavants were more complicated than they are now. A good course of action is to convert old Casavant ventil chests to pitman. You eliminate the old, sometimes troublesome stop action, and you gain the ability to fit the chest with a schwimmer and you essentially have a good as new chest. The distributors from the older Casavants can be a nuisance but there are ways of = simplifying their action. They tended to overdo some things-just to be safe I suppose. AjM              
(back) Subject: On Turkey's Wings From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 10:15:01 EST   I was not passing judgment on "On Eagles' Wings," despite that being = the initial subject of the threat. I was trying to figure out why Americans = are so willfully, militantly, and belligerently celebrate mediocrity, and have =   embraced it as a source of national pride, right to the top. Incidentally, the only time I've EVER heard the song was in the weeks following the release of the videotape of Ashcroft croaking it out, = bellowing at some breakfast meeting. It is impossible to know from that rendition, which David Letterman played on his show nightly for weeks afterwards, whether it has any musical value.  
(back) Subject: Casavant lever-arm and ventil chests From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 10:38:02 EST   Casavant lever-arm chests are all releatherable, and my firm has done them right down to the 32' Open Wood, where the valves are the size of professional chefs' skillets. They are most often found on Pedal wind = chests, and on 1-32 or 1-44 of a manual stop that is available in the Pedal by transmission. These are very different from non-transmitted offset chests, =   which operate by pneumatic tubing and exhaust small pouch blocks within = the offest chest (no extra magnets). While it is a much more facile operation to remove the lever arm = chests and invert them, releathering them as benchwork, they CAN be, and often = are, releathered in place. Obviously, the investment in both funds and time is =   greater, but if you can't haul an open 16' or 32' out of the instrument, = you still have the option of doing it in situ. In older ventil-style Casavant chests, there are special = considerations, such as the stop action valves, and one must be careful with the = half-rounds, etc. In general, if you make a graph with pouch schedules, well sizes, and =   valve sizes, they are quite releatherable. For Pitmans, just make new ones, using sharp punches, a good mallet = and punchpad, and above all else, THE PROPER WEIGHT OF LEATHER, or they won't move. With all releathering, get your calipers and match your leather thickness, get the best possible hides, grade them properly before you = stamp out your pouches, and be careful not to distort the springs. Older = Casavant pouch springs are of a different gauge, coil, and strength than the modern =   commercially available springs, so we simply had several hundred replicas made by a spring manufacturer for replacement work, since we were dealing with nearly 10,000 pipes. We found plenty of already-abused springs, while = a small handful had slightly distorted during the course of the work, and we =   didn't want to compromise. Of course, Mr. Speller is right, and a builder may tell you that it = would be a smaller investment in time and money to rechest the instrument with modern replacements. If one wishes to retain the original tone and voicing =   attack of the pipework, in the case of important or notably fine voicing = and finishing, it is best to match toe hole sizes and action type.   Sebastian M. Gluck Tonal Director, Gluck New York, Inc. Editor, Journal of American Organbuilding Columnist, The American Organist  
(back) Subject: Drive Throughs From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 09:43:48 -0600     Even better, in the light of such a recent volume of correspondence, "Drive-through Funerals" ? Then, of course, you could have a drive-by followed by a drive-through !   ________________________ Still better is the story of the new young Catholic priest who was doing well in his first parish with several innovative ideas. The bishop came to visit and was mostly complimentary. "Father," said the bishop, "Your spirit of innovation is good, and I can see that your people like it. I don't even object to the drive through confessional you installed, but ......................................             .............the flashing neon sign that says 'Toot-n-Tell or Go to Hell' is just too much!"     Dennis Steckley   Ich liebe meine Katzen        
(back) Subject: RE: From funerals to weddings From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 10:56:56 -0500   > Episcopal clergy will only marry people in places other than church for very special reasons.   Interesting. They indeed don't seem to perform marriages outside the = church very often, but I didn't know that this was a policy from on high.   Isn't true that when ecclesiastical solemnization of holy matrimony first became customary, the ceremony was never *in* the church, but just = outside, at the front door?      
(back) Subject: Re: Drive Throughs From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 10:58:48 -0500   All of this reminds me of the cult movie "The Loved One," with Jonathan = Winters, et al. One scene is in the chapel of the cemetary (LA's Forest Lawn, thinly disguised). A = wedding is in progress. The control room staff is eyeing the clock and turns on a large "CUT" sign on = the rear wall, visible only to the cleric (Ed Reimers, I believe.) He hurriedly finishes the = ceremony, and while the canned Mendelssohn plays the wedding party exits via a front side door. = Simultaneously, a funeral congregation enters from the rear, a black drape unrolls behind the altar, = the casket slides out from under the altar, during all of which Reimers lights a quick cigarette = from a nearby candleabra. Lugubrious music is then heard.   This flick was advertised as having "something to offend everybody." The = cemetary's casket room was overseen by Liberace. Rod Steiger also starred. Hilarious, if sick.   Stan Yoder  
(back) Subject: American mediocrity From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 10:02:37 -0600             Interesting that Frank DeFord was lamenting just the other day on NPR's Morning Edition that even in the National Football League mediocrity has won the day. Each team (with the exception of the Cincinnati Bengals, who just plain stink) is just about as bad as the next, and the only good = thing about this year's Super Bowl will be the commercials.   Why can I sit here and know full well that most people in my country have lousy taste, have no sense of culture, no appreciation of the finer things in life. Crassness and idiocy rule. I'll try not to get into politics and point to the fools in the Republican party. An awful lot of people from other countries think we're shallow and have no values, and I can only agree.   To get this on topic, I fear that American shallowness and glitziness is also apparent in a great percentage of the organ music being written and published today and for some decades. Name me a few recently-composed American organ works that break out of this mold that are also accessible and appealing, and I'll take due note.   Robert Lind       = TubaMagna@aol.com = On Turkey's Wings = =       I was not passing judgment on "On Eagles' Wings," despite that being the initial subject of the threat. I was trying to figure out why Americans = are   so willfully, militantly, and belligerently celebrate mediocrity, and have embraced it as a source of national pride, right to the top.        
(back) Subject: Re: American mediocrity From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:15:52 EST     --part1_67.75d15ae.2b5834b8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/16/2003 10:03:45 AM Central Standard Time, = lindr@cch.com writes:     > accessible > and appealing, and I'll take due note. >   libby larsen-pamela decker-frank ferko i still agree with you 110% greg   --part1_67.75d15ae.2b5834b8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/16/2003 10:03:45 AM Central Standard Time, lindr@cch.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">accessible <BR>and appealing, and I'll take due note. <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>libby larsen-pamela decker-frank ferko <BR>i still agree with you 110% <BR>greg</FONT></HTML>   --part1_67.75d15ae.2b5834b8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Cameron Carpenter in Allentown PA From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:17:50 -0500   > Is Cameron the youngest? Ol' Felix has been on the circuit for quite a while   Felix is younger, having turned just 17 last Sept. 14. Cameron, however, is the youngest *American*. I assume that Felix is still officially = German, although at his 16th birthday party (a very memorable occasion, held at = St. Peter's Lutheran Church, New York as a determined spark of light shining into the murk of 9/11) the pastor described him as a "one-man United Nations". German-born with a Russian mother, he obviously loves America = and seems to be on the way to citizenship.   And Cameron does seem to be the most controversial. Knowledgeable = reviewers here and in Piporg-L have been unanimous and unreserved in praising = Felix's and Ken's performances but give Cameron's mixed reviews. While = celebrating his technical brilliance, enthusiasm, and charisma, they take exception to some of his rhythmic liberties and other interpretive ideas. I'm looking forward to hearing him sometime to find out what all this is about.        
(back) Subject: Re: On Turkey's Wings From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 08:18:54 -0800     ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com>   > I was not passing judgment on "On Eagles' Wings," despite that being the > initial subject of the threat. I was trying to figure out why Americans are > so willfully, militantly, and belligerently celebrate mediocrity, and = have > embraced it as a source of national pride, right to the top. > Incidentally, the only time I've EVER heard the song was in the = weeks > following the release of the videotape of Ashcroft croaking it out, bellowing > at some breakfast meeting. It is impossible to know from that rendition, > which David Letterman played on his show nightly for weeks afterwards, > whether it has any musical value.   Seb:   I didn't see the Letterman, but I think Ashcroft sings some appalling travesty of his own creation, not "On Eagles' Wings" - which, as Paul = Emmons points out, is not a bad piece of music, though perhaps not to everyone's taste.     Michael Fox    
(back) Subject: Re: On Turkey's Wings From: "Steven Frank" <steve@virgilfox.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:19:52 -0500   on 1/16/03 10:15 AM, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Incidentally, the only time I've EVER heard the song was in the weeks > following the release of the videotape of Ashcroft croaking it out, = bellowing > at some breakfast meeting. It is impossible to know from that rendition, > which David Letterman played on his show nightly for weeks afterwards, > whether it has any musical value.     Hi, Sebastian, and all,   Although Ashcroft's singing was very funny, it was not Eagle's Wings. It = was another "eagle soaring" type of song.   Some negatives re Eagle's Wings: 1) starts on the 7th of the scale over a sub-dominant chord. 2) range is an octave and a fourth! 3) begins "you who" sounds like "yoohoo"   Steve    
(back) Subject: Re: American mediocrity From: "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 10:27:53 -0600   At 10:02 AM 1/16/03 -0600, you wrote: >published today and for some decades. Name me a few recently-composed >American organ works that break out of this mold that are also accessible >and appealing, and I'll take due note.   as an american composer/arranger of organ music not much interested in glitzy I'll take issue with this, while I am uncertain what you may mean by accesible what I have published is appealing if you like melodic pieces in a baroque style and I beleive most of it has enough depth as not to be boring. this would especially be true of the second volume of Celtic Organ music which will be released later this month       Regards, Richard Jordan   http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com http://www.OnJordansBanks.com  
(back) Subject: Re: From funerals to weddings From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:31:13 -0500   On 1/15/03 9:13 PM, "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote:   [quoting Alan]   >> To us, the building, the room, or the >> forest glade where a wedding is held has nothing to do with it. > > Not for Episcopalians, who almost exclusively marry in church. = Episcopal > clergy will only marry people in places other than church for very = special > reasons. > Agreed, John. When I said that the venue "has nothing to do with it," I meant "so far as the state is concerned." Lutherans, too, rarely and only under exceptional circumstances do weddings in unusual places. When I did those weddings in (even) "strange" places, I was NOT serving a parish (I = was retired), which liberated my conscience from the usual parish-pastor strictures; even though they were Christian ceremonies, I was functioning = as an officer of the state rather than as a parish clergyman. Had I been a parish pastor, I'd have accepted few or none of those ceremonies and/or their venues.   Alan          
(back) Subject: Re: From funerals to weddings From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:37:23 -0500   On 1/15/03 11:11 PM, "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > The same here in NZ. The bishop told me, in answer to my question, that > clergy in the diocese may only take weddings and baptisms outside a = parish > church if the family are more than 10 kilometres or more from a parish > church (medical reasons excepted). That means I've never, ever, taken a > wedding outside a church, and only a handful of baptisms. Personally, I = hate > taking funerals outside the church, too, even if it is an undertaker's > "chapel".   Ross, as my post a few minutes ago may have hinted, I'm in agreement not only with such a "rule" but with the spirit behind it. I feel even = stronger about those baptisms, except in extremis in the hospital or such circumstance. And I've never done a funeral other than in the church.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: From funerals to weddings From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:54:13 -0500   On 1/16/03 10:56 AM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > Isn't true that when ecclesiastical solemnization of holy matrimony = first > became customary, the ceremony was never *in* the church, but just = outside, > at the front door?   I can comment only that in recent generations (up to two centuries or so?) the Anglican wedding ceremony (and the Lutheran ones, taken over en toto from the Anglicans, in English-speaking countries) had two parts: (1) the declarations of intent and "giving away" of the bride--this held OUTSIDE = the chancel, in the nave; and (2) the actual vows, blessings, etc., done AT = the altar. But maybe that DOES have the roots that you describe. I don't = know.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: From funerals to weddings From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 12:26:44 -0500   Alan Freed writes:   > When I said that the venue "has nothing to do with it," I meant "so far = as the state is concerned." Lutherans, too, rarely and only under exceptional circumstances do weddings in unusual places. When I did those weddings in (even) "strange" places, I was NOT serving a parish (I = was retired), which liberated my conscience from the usual parish-pastor strictures;   Just out of curiosity, what prevents a Lutheran or Episcopal clergyman = from holding weddings elsewhere? Canon law? Bishop's directions as "the ordinary?" A ruling by the congregation itself?   And what is the reasoning behind such a prohibition?   Perhaps it's for the same reason that banns are published: to enable any third persons who object to the marriage to appear and do so. If the ceremony is held in some out-of the-way, obscure spot, perhaps on private property with "no trespassing" signs all around it, this precaution = (however seldom the opportunity is taken) can easily become impracticable. More generally, strange sites violate the spirit of its being a public event in front of various witnesses, and (in the case of parishioners) seem to exclude or disregard the parish as quasi-family who should feel welcome to share the celebration in their usual meeting place.   Those sound like good possible explantions to me. I just wonder whether this is the actual rationale. As bizarre as the idea of holding a = Christian wedding away from the church building seems to me personally, I am also (agreeing with the 16th-century reformers for a change) adamant as to the essential superfluity of clergy for the validity of marriage. How can it need the church building when it doesn't even need a priest? There's got = to be a better, more objective reason than some vague (and rather Manichaean) feeling that a secular setting is just an inappropriate place.     Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: From funerals to weddings From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 12:35:39 -0500   > (1) the declarations of intent and "giving away" of the bride--this = held OUTSIDE the chancel, in the nave; and (2) the actual vows, blessings, etc., done AT = the altar. But maybe that DOES have the roots that you describe.   That's right, I forgot about that. Hence the little procession from the front of the nave to the altar steps, during which we organists are often instructed either to be sure to play a moment of traveling music, or not = to. This perambulation is a vestige of earlier practice.      
(back) Subject: Re: American mediocrity From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 13:46:25 EST     --part1_12b.2054028b.2b585801_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I'm wondering if it's mediocrity or complacency or apathy, some of each? = I know that within the context in which I minister (as a full-time = musician), I deal with folks, wonderful that they are, that simply have no vision of = what "could be", merely what "is".   At my most recent meeting with our staff/parish relations committee (i.e., =   personnel), after all the discussions and bantering, I simply said, "I am = not willing to sell THIS place short." They were taken aback by that.   Last night, the building committee approved my requests and = recommendations for the new family life center. They have no real clue about what a FLC "could" be. But when they saw what the architect and I worked out in = hours of meetings, perhaps they have caught a vision (I certainly hope so).   Having said all that, my former pastor had a vision of what our music = program could be. He pushed for bringing me here and pushed for a new pipe organ (now 8 years old).   Mediocrity does NOT have to prevail, although it is the prevailing sensibility these days. It will not be allowed to prevail in my church. = And I think, God will honor my determination.   Keep up the good work, comrades!!   Neil Brown       --part1_12b.2054028b.2b585801_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I'm wondering if it's mediocrity or complacency = or apathy, some of each?&nbsp; I know that within the context in which I = minister (as a full-time musician), I deal with folks, wonderful that they = are, that simply have no vision of what "could be", merely what = "is".&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> At my most recent meeting with our staff/parish relations committee (i.e., = personnel), after all the discussions and bantering, I simply said, "I am = not willing to sell THIS place short."&nbsp; They were taken aback by = that.<BR> <BR> Last night, the building committee approved my requests and = recommendations for the new family life center.&nbsp; They have no real = clue about what a FLC "could" be.&nbsp; But when they saw what the = architect and I worked out in hours of meetings, perhaps they have caught = a vision (I certainly hope so).<BR> <BR> Having said all that, my former pastor had a vision of what our music = program could be.&nbsp; He pushed for bringing me here and pushed for a = new pipe organ (now 8 years old).&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Mediocrity does NOT have to prevail, although it is the prevailing = sensibility these days.&nbsp; It will not be allowed to prevail in my = church.&nbsp; And I think, God will honor my determination.<BR> <BR> Keep up the good work, comrades!!<BR> <BR> Neil Brown<BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_12b.2054028b.2b585801_boundary--