PipeChat Digest #3388 - Saturday, January 18, 2003
 
RE: Bach CDs--your choices solicited
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
O.K., Maybe I'm just stupid, but.
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3387 - 01/17/03
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: Mediocrity
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho
  by "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org>
Saving Pipe Organs from the Wrecking Ball
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Lemare Recording
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
ON Eagle's Wings
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
OT-ish:  inflatable church
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Fwd: Re Sand
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Mediocrity
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
Re: Mediocrity
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
re: from funerals to weddings
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Re: Lemare Recording
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Weddings and wierd music
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
RE.: MEDIOCRITY
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Bach CDs--your choices solicited From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 14:07:34 -0600   Bob:   Robert Clark's recording (2 CDs) at Naumburg is very fine.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: lindr@cch.com [mailto:lindr@cch.com]=20 Sent: Friday, January 17, 2003 12:36 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Bach CDs--your choices solicited             I have a friend who recently has become quite enamored of the Preston Bach recordings. I'd like to introduce a little variety into her diet but am not "up" on who is best at what. I don't want taffy-pulling rubato, I don't want inhuman machine-like playing. I'm looking for historically-informed playing that truly comes alive, has emotion, bears repeated listening, and is well-recorded on a fine instrument in a good building. Is that all? No. I want inexpensive. Cutouts from Berkshire Records is what I'm thinking. I'd much rather spend $2-$6 per CD than $16-$20.   Here are some artists from the Berkshire roundup I thought looked interesting: Lagace, Genevieve Soly (new name [Canadian] to me--she plays the concerti), Rogg, Fagius, Radulescu (1 disc), Idenstam (1 disc). There are many others, several of whom I don't consider to be at their best in this literature.   I know Lagace was discussed quite favorably recently on a list. Was it this one? Could you list your favorites, if possible, among his many offerings, or is everything of equal importance?   Thanks very much, Bob Lind       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: O.K., Maybe I'm just stupid, but. From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 16:23:45 -0500   An organ of historical value goes down with the building? CRASH! as The Organ Death Penalty is executed in Honolulu.   ALOHA!   Where are the Organ Preservation Societies?   Of which I pay some money for slick magazines?   OHS? ATOS? - you publish nice organ magazines.   Can you save an organ?   Or are you just selling magazines?   Show us what you can Do!   Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3387 - 01/17/03 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 21:57:07 +0000   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'><DIV> <P><BR><BR></P> <DIV></DIV> <P>Lots of interesting topics here. Yes, Ron - you are absolutely right. = (Ron Severin). Bach registration - you want to hear a stunning performance = of the Bach "Gig" Fugue? Listen to Edwin H Lemare <A = href=3D"http://www.orgel.com/music/lemare-e.html">http://www.orgel.com/musi= c/lemare-e.html</A>&nbsp;playing it on Tubas etc virtually throughout - = but he sure knows how the notes go! I&nbsp;posted a bit of the = original&nbsp;"American Mediocrity" post on History House - I don't know = if any other members of this list&nbsp;subscribe to that, but being = interested in history in an amateur sort of way&nbsp;&nbsp;I quite enjoy = reading the posts there -&nbsp;it&nbsp;has a predominantly US membership. = It has produced quite a few replies - mostly agreeing with the = proposition! However there are some fine American performers, not only in = the organ loft. It is very hard to judge the long term musical worth of = composers - Benjamin Britten with Elgar and Purcell are probably the only = world class composer <P>www.johnfoss.gr </P></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV></div><br clear=3Dall><hr>MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection = service: <a href=3D"http://g.msn.com/8HMQEN/2020">2 months FREE*</a> = </html>  
(back) Subject: Re: Mediocrity From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 17:48:00 EST     --part1_17d.156cb0b7.2b59e220_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Mediocrity to me is "ho hum", lack luster, lack of sparkle, lack of = spirit, whatever terms one wishes to use.   Frankly, mediocrity can quite simply be a lack of preparation on the part = of the presenter. Whether in concert or in worship, it's inexcusable.   Neil Brown   --part1_17d.156cb0b7.2b59e220_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Mediocrity to me is "ho hum", lack luster, lack = of sparkle, lack of spirit, whatever terms one wishes to use.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Frankly, mediocrity can quite simply be a lack of preparation on the part = of the presenter.&nbsp; Whether in concert or in worship, it's = inexcusable.<BR> <BR> Neil Brown</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17d.156cb0b7.2b59e220_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho From: "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 09:54:37 +1100   Hello quilisma,   Saturday, January 18, 2003, 6:27:10 AM, you wrote:   > Wasn't there just a discussion recently to the effect that it WAS > possible to use heel-and-toe on the organs of Bach's time (at least some > of them), and that evidence had surfaced to support at least the > POSSIBILITY that Bach DID?   See the (English) IAO publication "Organists' Review" November 2002 for an article by Johannes Geffert (Koln) in this subject based on writings of Petri, Turk, Knecht and Kittel and generally concluding that a toe heel technique may well have formed part of Bach's technique.   Geffert's conclusion is worth quoting in full:   'When I teach pedal playing I sympathise with Petri: "one has to be armed to encounter all types of pedalboards, all shapes and styles". I believe that a pure application of toe playing must be understood and practiced but not applied too rigorously. To understand it, it is necessary to employ appropriate technique to make musical sense "..a secure and effortless technique will free the player to concentrate on playing more musically and communicating with the listener...". This is in fact the whole point: to let the music speak and not be overly compelled by adherence to narrow views on toe or heel.'   -- Regards, Roger   Roger Brown roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org http://rogerbrown.tripod.com http://member.melbpc.org.au/~robrown/    
(back) Subject: Saving Pipe Organs from the Wrecking Ball From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 18:35:58 EST   Dear Mr. Lowkis et alia: Saving important (or even "un"important) pipe organs is a very difficult =   task, and is rarely, if ever, accomplished by an organization. Rather, = when it occurs, it is done by individuals, organbuilding firms, or groups of concerned and motivated people who can organize and fund the endeavor. While many of the advocacy organizations DO produce informative journals =   and can be successfully at lobbying for the cause, they are rarely made up = of people who have the funds, personnel, and resources. Removing an organ can =   cost many tens of thousands of dollars - wages, crate building, packing materials, trucks, rigging and riggers, dismantling expertise, and the unbelievable cost of storage, unless it is going directly to a workshop or =   its new home. We are in the process of trying to save several pipe organs over 100 = years old, in exceptional condition (including an IV manual with a 32' Open and = a very rare III manual nearly 120 years old that has barely been tuned, = leaving its voicing unaltered). The bureaucracy is staggering, and sometimes negotiations drag on for so long that the organ is lost to the wrecking = ball. Many times, the rug is pulled out from under the project, promises are broken, or the instrument ends up split parted out, electrified, or = chopped up into a neo-something by somebody insensitive. When moving or storing an =   antique musical monument, NOTHING is guaranteed. In all fairness, the theatre organ groups DO tend to be more motivated, even though they have come under a great deal of criticism for sometimes launching in without professional advice, or re-specifying the unification =   without realizing that it is an important feature of the original tonal design. The fact remains that some of these local groups, even with = minimal training, have saved and refurbished a number of American theatre organs, = and they continue to be played and heard. I have seen several pipe organs removed from churches, only to be left = in heaps in the new location, too badly damaged to be used, or junked in a warehouse in a tangled pile, languishing until disposed of. The most important point here is that organists have developed an odd cultural gap between veneration of the antique, but unrelenting resistance = to the notion of a "used" pipe organ. A "used" Amati violin is never passed = up, and a "used" Wissner grand is most sought after, yet the number of "used" Skinners, Kimballs, Roosevelts, and Johnsons that have been relegated to = the landfill is heartbreaking and angering. Summing up: educate OTHER ORGANISTS about the virtues of saving = instruments or some of the pipework; handle and store the organ or its parts properly = and with respect; talk to as many organists and pipe organ builders as you can =   when you know that an instrument is in danger. Why do organists think that =   there is only one way, or even no way, to relocate an organ? If your = "local organ tech" gives you a blank look and a shrug, cast your net much, much wider. Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Lemare Recording From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 17:59:14 -0600   At 9:57 PM +0000 01/17/03, John Foss wrote: >Lots of interesting topics here. Yes, Ron - you are absolutely >right. (Ron Severin). Bach registration - you want to hear a >stunning performance of the Bach "Gig" Fugue? Listen to Edwin H >Lemare ><http://www.orgel.com/music/lemare-e.html>http://www.orgel.com/music/lemar= e-e.html playing >it on Tubas etc virtually throughout -   John   i think I have to disagree with you - i don't think that it is being played on Tubas throughout. I would have to go do some research but as I remember the Welte system did not control the registration. I have a feeling that Nelson Barden, who played these rolls on the Church of the Covenant organ for this recording probably did the registration. And what I am hearing is what would be typical Diapasons on an organ of that vintage.   I do have to say that Lemare's playing is impeccable. I heard Nelson play these rolls at a late night session during a Boston AGO Convention. I think all of us that heard them that night were highly impressed.   Lemare along with some other organists including Virgil Fox played to make the music ENJOYABLE to the listening public. None of this "academically correct" crap that we hear at way too many organ recitals today. One of today's current crop of young organists that plays in this fashion is Ken Cowan - he makes MUSIC and makes the music ENJOYABLE to the general public. We need more concert artists like Ken, ones that don't worry about "toes only" or not using the Swell boxes, etc. The "dry" academic type recitals have done a great deal to make the organ go out of favor with the general public.   Recently I attended a concert played by one of the "academic" types of recital artists. I was bored to death with the whole thing. He closed the first half with the Bach Passacaglia played in a very academically correct way but was deadly. I told someone during the intermission that I needed to go home and listen to a GOOD version of the piece to wash that performance out of my ears. And the version I listened to later was the performance of Ken Cowan playing the piece on the new Nichols & Simpson organ in Kalamazoo, Michigan at its dedication. The difference between the two versions was like night and day. Ken MADE music - the other performer just pressed all the right (well almost <G>) notes.   i guess I'm back on my soapbox about making our favorite instrument ENJOYABLE for the general public. But I think it is something we ALL have to be concerned about.   David  
(back) Subject: ON Eagle's Wings From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 19:13:23 -0600   "My church uses it occasionally when the message is about God's support and comfort in adveristy - not too often, because it is musically lacking and so awkward to sing. But in the right setting, the text speaks in spite of the musical deficiencies."   *********************************** I agree it is hard to sing--it was originally written for a soloist--but I disagree with your assessment of the music quality; I find it beautiful = and fitting to the text. Dennis Steckley    
(back) Subject: OT-ish: inflatable church From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 20:18:19 -0500   http://www.inflatablechurch.com   Hop on into the site and download the 2.7mb movie. It's a must-see. Right down to the inflatable (though sadly nonfunctional) organ =   with pipe facade. :)))   They were interviewing the owner of the company who makes this thing on CBC Radio 1 about an hour ago. It takes 3 hours to set up, 2.5 hours to knock down, and they're planning to sell them to other countries. Evidently blow-up hymn books can also be made.   Thinking this is a delightfully kooky wedding location, Ad ;->      
(back) Subject: Fwd: Re Sand From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 20:43:13 -0600   > > >8 PM Friday 1/17 >Visited with Sand at 6 PM. He seems to be feeling well. He has not >had anything to eat since he left the hospital on Wednesday PM, so >he is starving. (actually a good sign!) He said he ate some >toothpaste as a snack. I talked to the nurse to try to get him >something. His vital signs seem stable--better than yesterday. He >has not thrown up anymore. They will probably move him out of ICU as >soon as a bed is available. I will continue to keep you posted. >Thanks for your prayers. D H   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Mediocrity From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 22:16:02 -0500   From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 12:52:05 -0500   > Mediocrity has many meanings. <snip> > If it means accessable service music to most players, > such as the Lorenz offerings and similar music, then > we part company. There is a definate place in a service > for well crafted, but easily acquired material. Recital > music as preludes and postludes will work only in big > churches, or where this sort of thing is encouraged. > I think appropriateness is a better word. <snip> > I do think it may be mediocre to play great music badly, > just to say you played something harder or out of reach > of most others. That borders on elitist leanings, > which I always find pretentious and silly. A church service > is not a concert. <snip> > Is the music mediocre, or the thinking behind it?   Thank you, Ron. Yes, I need to think a little more explicitly about my = own meaning. (I don't mind disagreeing with you, by the way, but I certainly wouldn't want to "part company", please!)   I certainly agree about concertizing vs. worship, and I certainly don't = intend to concertize in a church service, or mix the two.   I agree that the mediocrity has very much to do with the thinking behind = the music -- the thinking behind how it was written as well as how it is = played.   You see, my technique has been horrible for 30+ (egad, 40+) years. It = limits my playing. I have to think about the notes too much. I want to improve my technique in order to broaden my music choices. I want to understand the instrument better to interpret even easier music more thoughtfully.   Recently someone on one of the lists noted a CCM church's advertisement = that itemized "No boring organ music" as one of its assets. I covet that = asset. Yes, I wish I could play like Felix, but that just ain't gonna happen. = I'm too old to acquire that level of technique, besides just not being that = gifted.   But I can keep from being boring. Playing just to fill the time is = boring. Playing for applause is boring, too.   I played for a long time -- just not very well -- mediocre. Then I = "retired" for a few years. Then, I was "called" to play. I figured if I was being "called", it wasn't to be mediocre.   Probably, in a couple of years, I'll come back to this "mediocre" music, = and find the music wasn't mediocre after all. It was me.   Mark Koontz      
(back) Subject: Re: Mediocrity From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 23:05:34 EST     --part1_10f.1d275828.2b5a2c8e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Mark:   Technique comes with playing music within your own personal ability. Pedaling is probably where most need some work. Knowing where the feet are at all times helps sight reading immensely. In the beginning work with hymns, bass in the pedal of course, tenor and alto in the left hand, solo the tune in the right hand. Mark your pedal toes and heels so it's smooth. Over time doing this with hymns helps your sight reading of much more involved material. Wear shoes that help you feel the pedal notes. The Harold Gleason method is still one of the best method books, and was the foundation for Harold's teaching when he opened the Eastman School of Music. The most useful Bach works for most service playing are the eight little P&F the Anna Magdalena Book, and some of the Cantata transcriptions such as Jesu Joy. Stick to a steady diet of that sort of thing for a while, and things will happen for you beyond your wildest immagination. Work on the Couperin Masses and what ever sounds good to you. Make it fun, and it will become your own.   Of the eight P&F my personal favorite is the Em especially the fugue. If the pedal is registered right can soar to the heavens. Don't discount these so called spurious gems. There is a universe of learning contained with in these basic pieces, if you give them the respect they surely deserve.   All the best Mark,   Ron Severin   --part1_10f.1d275828.2b5a2c8e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hi Mark:<BR> <BR> Technique comes with playing music within your own personal<BR> ability. Pedaling is probably where most need some work. Knowing<BR> where the feet are at all times helps sight reading immensely.<BR> In the beginning work with hymns, bass in the pedal of course,<BR> tenor and alto in the left hand, solo the tune in the right hand. <BR> Mark your pedal toes and heels so it's smooth. Over time doing<BR> this with hymns helps your sight reading of much more involved<BR> material. Wear shoes that help you feel the pedal notes. The<BR> Harold Gleason method is still one of the best method books,<BR> and was the foundation for Harold's teaching when he opened<BR> the Eastman School of Music. The most useful Bach works<BR> for most service playing are the eight little P&amp;F the Anna = Magdalena<BR> Book, and some of the Cantata transcriptions such as Jesu Joy.<BR> Stick to a steady diet of that sort of thing for a while, and things<BR> will happen for you beyond your wildest immagination. Work on the<BR> Couperin Masses and what ever sounds good to you. Make it fun,<BR> and it will become your own. <BR> <BR> Of the eight P&amp;F my personal favorite is the Em especially the = fugue.<BR> If the pedal is registered right can soar to the heavens. Don't = discount<BR> these so called spurious gems. There is a universe of learning<BR> contained with in these basic pieces, if you give them the respect<BR> they surely deserve.<BR> <BR> All the best Mark,<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_10f.1d275828.2b5a2c8e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: re: from funerals to weddings From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 20:08:04 -0800 (PST)   John Speller writes:   Not for Episcopalians, who almost exclusively marry in church. Episcopal clergy will only marry people in places other than church for very special reasons.     When my wife and I married, we just didn't want a church wedding. I had spent my life playing for weddings and making it pretty for everyone else, and when it came to my own, we agreed to get married at home. We had an episcopal priest who is a family friend marry us in our living room with our friends standing around. My best friend who was also my best man played prelude and postlude voluntaries on my Flentrop organ (I didn't have the Artiste yet)and it was a beautiful ceremony. After we finished the ceremony we went upstairs and changed into jeans and had a barbecue and margheritas. Later that day there were Grucci fireworks on the Hudson to celebrate the centennial of Nyack Hospital, so we all walked down to the river playing the 1812 Overture on kazoos all the way to the amazement of the entire town. It was a great wedding day.   On the subject of "drive by funerals/weddings" I remember when I was younger and had just started my teaching career I used to spend a lot of time in Daytona Beach where my parents had recently moved from Indiana. There was a funeral home on US 1 that had a drive through window exactly like the ones in banks with the thick glass and the drawer that came out to put money in. In this case the drawer contained a guest register and pen, and when you pushed a button, velvet drapes parted inside and lights slowly came up on the coffin and its contents slightly tilted so you could see. It became a popular thing to do among young bar-hoppers to drive through in the wee hours (if you didn't feel like going to the inlet to skinny dip), push the button and view the corpse of the day, and if you were really drunk, SIGN THE BOOK, making up some fictious name that you thought ironic or funny. It got to be such a popular entertainment, that they finally closed up the window. You can still see the outline where it was on the side of their building. The next move was usually a 5:00 a.m. breakfast at Sambo's before going home to bed.   Ken (who can barely stay up til 10:00 these days.)       =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Kenneth Potter, Organist/Director of Music St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square, Bronx, NY 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, Austin Op. 2097 at: = http://www.nycago.org/Organs/html/StPetersEpBronx.html =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. http://mailplus.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Lemare Recording From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 23:27:16 EST     --part1_a3.37cc71cb.2b5a31a4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi David:   I couldn't agree more with your assessment of Lemare's playing, no matter who is responsible for the actual registration. Nelson did a fine job of allowing this fine symphonic organist of the past to come alive for us, using the type of stops he most likely was very familiar with. It was indeed fun to listen to, and an appreciation for Edwin's symphonic style. You are right about recital material, and how it's presented and played. People will return again and again to hear musical artists at work. There is a fluidity and grace in people like Ken Cowan, Catherine Crozier that is pure gold to listen to. It is apparent that they listen as well as play. Felix is like that too, a pure joy.   Ron Severin   --part1_a3.37cc71cb.2b5a31a4_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hi David:<BR> <BR> I couldn't agree more with your assessment of Lemare's playing,<BR> no matter who is responsible for the actual registration. Nelson<BR> did a fine job of allowing this fine symphonic organist of the<BR> past to come alive for us, using the type of stops he most<BR> likely was very familiar with. It was indeed fun to listen to, and<BR> an appreciation for Edwin's symphonic style. You are right about<BR> recital material, and how it's presented and played. People will<BR> return again and again to hear musical artists at work. There is<BR> a fluidity and grace in people like Ken Cowan, Catherine Crozier<BR> that is pure gold to listen to. It is apparent that they listen as = well<BR> as play. Felix is like that too, a pure joy.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a3.37cc71cb.2b5a31a4_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and wierd music From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 23:59:34 EST     --part1_1ad.ef72e9d.2b5a3936_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/17/03 4:00:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, EchoGamba@aol.com writes:     For any confused readers, 'Puff the magic dragon' lived in 'Honour Leigh'. = Isn't that song all about the effects one might experience through drug = usage?     I didn't relize that Honor Leigh was where Puff lived, having never seen = the text of the song written, and, actually, never gave it much thought.   I always thought it was a very cute song about a boy with an active imagination growing up and having to part with his. It's always been a favorite of mine. I mercifully managed somehow to live through the = sixties and seventies without being exposed to the drug culture first hand, = although I did get a whiff of it on occasion, but nothing that was remotely = attractive.   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502     --part1_1ad.ef72e9d.2b5a3936_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica>In a message dated 1/17/03 4:00:37 AM = Eastern Standard Time, EchoGamba@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR>For any confused readers, 'Puff the magic dragon' lived in 'Honour = Leigh'. &nbsp;Isn't that song all about the effects one might experience = through drug usage? <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I didn't relize that Honor Leigh was where Puff lived, having never = seen the text of the song written, and, actually, never gave it much = thought. <BR> <BR>I always thought it was a very cute song about a boy with an active = imagination growing up and having to part with his. &nbsp;&nbsp;It's = always been a favorite of mine. &nbsp;&nbsp;I mercifully managed somehow = to live through the sixties and seventies without being exposed to the = drug culture first hand, although I did get a whiff of it on occasion, but = nothing that was remotely attractive. <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_1ad.ef72e9d.2b5a3936_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE.: MEDIOCRITY From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 22:13:56 -0800 (PST)   I would much rather go to a church and hear someone play Ellen Jane Lorenz well than to hear him butcher the major works which are far beyond his reach technically.   As for the "contemporary" crap we have inflicted on us, I would simply prefer to attend a service where there was no music than to have to listen to this guitar twanging and drum-beating shit.   I think that if this junk doesn't go out-of-style soon, we will need to have a bar installed in the choir room so that anyone attending the services who has any musical taste at all can at least fortify himself with a martini before having to hear such a noise.   I am really enjoying church services these days. I stay the hell away from them.   D. Keith Morgan       __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. http://mailplus.yahoo.com