PipeChat Digest #3390 - Saturday, January 18, 2003
 
Re: heel-and-toe, YOW !
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Weddings and wierd music
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re : Lemare recording
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Mediocrity
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Mediocrity - untactfully
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Mediocrity
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
NYTimes.com Article: Ex-Music Director of Church Admits Raping Girl
  by <marika57@optonline.net>
Early Spanish Music
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: RE.: MEDIOCRITY
  by "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca>
Fred Astaire
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Mediocrity and church music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Weddings and wierd music
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
RE: Early Spanish Music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: heel-and-toe, YOW ! From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 10:09:13 -0000   -----Original Message----- From: Ross & Lynda Wards <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 18 January 2003 08:55 Subject: Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho     > >In other words, use any part of your body to play any note you damn well >please, as long as the musical result is worth listening to. >   I read, and I started thinking ........ Yes, I know they were adolescent and purile thoughts, but they occupied a merry moment. Then again, how would you indicate to future generations how you wanted = the performer to distort themselves - to the audience's heightened amusement, = no doubt (and isn't that what we're all about ?)   And then again, to obtain an 'authentic' performance of a Sir Adrian Boult rendition, should one also imitate his unique conducting style ? Don't some people sway a lot these days ! So much attention paid to the fingers and wrist positions, so much written about relaxation techniques = in back, shoulders and arms; and nary a word on how whole-body action might effect things (although whole-body action is 'de-rigeur' for "air-guitar" solos).   musicman (Still busy unravelling himself)    
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and wierd music From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 07:28:05 -0500       Cremona502@cs.com wrote:     > [snip] > I mercifully managed somehow to live through the > sixties and seventies without being exposed to the > drug culture first hand, although I did get a whiff > of it on occasion, but nothing that was remotely > attractive.   Hi Bruce, That's because you didn't get a good enough whiff. You have to get close enough to inhale you know--just ask Bill. (g)    
(back) Subject: Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 07:34:14 -0500       Ross & Lynda Wards wrote:   > [snip] > > In other words, use any part of your body to play any note you damn well > please, as long as the musical result is worth listening to. > > Ross >   Hi Ross, I once heard Felix Hell play the piano with his nose during a rare = relaxing moment between registration rehearsal sessions on a Casavant organ. The = result was still quite musical indeed. Methinks it's the artist and not the body = part that contains the music. (g)    
(back) Subject: Re : Lemare recording From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 12:39:41 +0000   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'><DIV> <P>Having read your comments, David, I listened to the Lemare recording = again - I was replying some what instinctively to a post about Bach = registration and the sound in my mind was of Tuba's in the Lemare = recordings. It was about 6 months ago I listened to it previously. In fact = it sounds a bit like enclosed&nbsp;Compton Tuba/Tromba's on their big = concert organs though it may be a Diapason (Diaphone?) chorus with a reed = added - there is definitely, to my ears at any rate, a reed attack at the = beginning of each note. Also I am playing it through a "reserve" AIWA mid = fi system attached to my PC which hasn't got the breadth of sound of the = big system which my organ plays through. It wasn't until you mentioned it = that I realised it was a player roll - I thought it might have been an = early acoustic recording - and I have no idea what the specification of = the organ in the Church of the Covenant, Boston is. If it is a player roll = did he have a chance to "polish" the performance like MIDI? Pe <DIV></DIV>www.johnfoss.gr <DIV></DIV></div><br clear=3Dall><hr>The new MSN 8 is here: Try it <a = href=3D"http://g.msn.com/8HMQEN/2018">free* for 2 months</a> </html>  
(back) Subject: Re: heel-and-toe, yo ho ho From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 07:15:02 -0600   When we were young we thought we knew everything and our elders were old and stupid...for some reason we either had enough common sense or respect not to show it...and it was amazing how much smarter these older folks got =   as we got older.   Jon    
(back) Subject: Mediocrity From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 09:20:23 EST     --part1_1bf.1bb8d572.2b5abca7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   I think one will find the meaning of mediocrity - as it was brought up = here - in a book by Frankey Schaeffer (the son of Francis Schaeffer) entitled, "Addicted to Mediocrity".   While in school, I bought this book thinking that it was discussion mediocrity in the Christian life. Surprisingly, it was discussing the = "arts" and how the church has rewarded and encouraged mediocrity. Over the = years, I've forgotten much of the substance of the book, so I would commend it to =   y'all for reading.   Part of his premise was that much of fine art came "out of" the church. There was a "genius" behind the music - both the structure of the music as =   well as lyrics had depth. Some time in the not so recent past, art came under fire and was disdained by the church unless there was an obvious Christian meaning to it.   Anyway, I think many Christian bookstores will carry this book. It's not = a large book and most of it could be read while standing at the bookshelf in =   the store.   Thanks, Keith   --part1_1bf.1bb8d572.2b5abca7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> I think one will find the meaning of mediocrity - as it was brought up = here - in a book by Frankey Schaeffer (the son of Francis Schaeffer) = entitled, "Addicted to Mediocrity".<BR> <BR> While in school, I bought this book thinking that it was discussion = mediocrity in the Christian life.&nbsp; Surprisingly, it was discussing = the "arts" and how the church has rewarded and encouraged = mediocrity.&nbsp; Over the years, I've forgotten much of the substance of = the book, so I would commend it to y'all for reading.<BR> <BR> Part of his premise was that much of fine art came "out of" the = church.&nbsp; There was a "genius" behind the music - both the structure = of the music as well as lyrics had depth.&nbsp; Some time in the not so = recent past, art came under fire and was disdained by the church unless = there was an obvious Christian meaning to it.<BR> <BR> Anyway, I think many Christian bookstores will carry this book.&nbsp; It's = not a large book and most of it could be read while standing at the = bookshelf in the store.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1bf.1bb8d572.2b5abca7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Mediocrity - untactfully From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 09:26:27 EST     --part1_1b9.c9560a7.2b5abe13_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,     > As for the "contemporary" crap we have inflicted on us, I would simply > prefer to attend a service where there was no music than to have to = listen > to this > guitar twanging and drum-beating shit.   Again, I seriously question the appropriateness of church leaders using = this kind of language when discussing the frustrations of their position. How = can I say it without coming across as sounding judgemental, but this kind of language should not be used by people who say that they are to "lead" = people in worship of a Holy God.   Sorry, kinda, Keith   --part1_1b9.c9560a7.2b5abe13_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">As for the = "contemporary" crap we have inflicted on us, I would simply prefer to = attend a service where there was no music than to have to listen to = this<BR> guitar twanging and drum-beating shit.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Again, I seriously question the appropriateness of church leaders using = this kind of language when discussing the frustrations of their = position.&nbsp; How can I say it without coming across as sounding = judgemental, but this kind of language should not be used by people who = say that they are to "lead" people in worship of a Holy God.<BR> <BR> Sorry, kinda,<BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1b9.c9560a7.2b5abe13_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Mediocrity From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 15:32:08 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Back in the 1960's, when I was very young, I recall the "God is dead" movement. I also recall the writings of Dr John Robinson (then Bishop of Woolwich in the UK) and his book entitled "God of the gaps". More recently, the wonderful and inspirational writings of the last Bishop of Durham, Dr Jenkins.   However, being the discriminating type, I also became aware of the superlative writings of Dietrich Boenhoffer and his blend of modernity and Christology.   I grew up confused, but determined not to follow the conventional path.   Now....let's go back to the days of GREAT spiritual/church patronage....the 18th century and before, when God was in his heaven and all was right with the world. No uncertainties, no deep questions other than the business of planetary motion etc etc. The church had real power and influence and were, by and large, in tune with what was going on in the world.   The music was solid, considered, a part of the wider sphere of musical activity. Ask yourselves a question perhaps. Is the secular music of Bach not the language of Lutheran hymnody also? It is possible to hum the opening of "Wachet Auf" whilst playing one of the French Suites, for example.   A society "in tune" with itself and its creator.   Then comes along science, mathematic, physics, geometry, questions about the origins of life, an expanding world, cross cultural influences etc etc.   Then comes the "Big Bang" (a term coined by its arch rival...Prof Sir Fred Hoyle of the "steady state" thinking brigade) and the implication that the origin of everything had infinite mass but absolutely no circumference. (Steady State is even more confusing).   Discoveries continue apace and Hubble has opened our eyes and perceptions to virtual infinity....unimaginbale even one hundred years ago.   I'm sure you get my meaning........conventional religion has been rubbished; excatly the way that Boenhoffer predicted in his suggestion that there was and would be such a thing as religionless Christianity.   Where does this leave the churches?   At the touch line? A mere annoying diversion from truth? Powerless? Irrelevant? Old hat? Estranged from the world and society?   Perhaps it is all these things if the name of the religious game is power and influence.   It is this which is at the core of the lamentable power struggle between Darwinists and Fundamentalism....at its sharpest, and perhaps most ludicrous, in the USA.   People are simply not turned on by religion posing as pseudo-science.....the classic "God of the gaps".   Still....there is another side to religion which still continues to inspire. There is the beauty of Christology and the overpowering appeal of Christian concern and love. There is both joy and pathos in the fabulous art of church music......much of it written in the past 120 years. The gravity of really great organ music is not a small component in this art.   When the "divines" of this world admit that they know very, very little, like the rest of us, then perhaps they will be in a position to humble themselves before their creator and concentrate on the imitation of the spirit and body, rather than pursuing the trappings of failed power and conceited religious imperialism.   I've said enough.....discuss!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Kzimmer0817@aol.com wrote: > > > I think one will find the meaning of mediocrity - as > it was brought up here - > in a book by Frankey Schaeffer (the son of Francis > Schaeffer) entitled, > "Addicted to Mediocrity". > > While in school, I bought this book thinking that it > was discussion > mediocrity in the Christian life. Surprisingly, it > was discussing the "arts" > and how the church has rewarded and encouraged > mediocrity.....   ...... Some time in the not so > recent past, art came > under fire and was disdained by the church unless > there was an obvious > Christian meaning to it. > >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: NYTimes.com Article: Ex-Music Director of Church Admits Raping Girl From: <marika57@optonline.net> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 10:33:58 -0500 (EST)   This article from NYTimes.com has been sent to you by marika57@optonline.net.       Ex-Music Director of Church Admits Raping Girl   January 18, 2003         RIVERHEAD, N.Y., Jan. 17 - The former music director of a Long Island church admitted in court today that he repeatedly raped an 11-year-old girl who had been his music student and a baby sitter to his two small children.   The defendant, Matthew Filippi, 34, pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree rape and to endangering the welfare of a minor, admitting he had sex with the girl in December 2001 and March 2002. The first rape occurred in his home in Setauket and the second in his van in a parking lot in nearby Port Jefferson, he said.   Acting Justice Michael F. Mullen of State Supreme Court here said he would sentence Mr. Filippi to 12 years in prison when he returns to court on Feb. 14. Mr. Filippi was sent to the Suffolk County jail, where he has been held since last April.   Mr. Filippi was indicted last year on five counts of rape, two of sodomy and one of endangering a child. He could have faced up to 25 years in prison on the charges to which he pleaded guilty.   The Suffolk district attorney's office agreed to the 12-year sentence primarily to help the victim avoid the trauma of having to testify, according to Raymond A. Tierney, assistant district attorney.   "No amount of time would fully redress the injury suffered by this child," Mr. Tierney said.   Mr. Filippi worked as a private music teacher, giving the victim voice and keyboard lessons for about two years, Mr. Tierney said.   "These were not isolated incidents," he said, "and this was not an isolated victim."   Mr. Tierney said that items police found on the defendant's computer indicated "many additional acts occurred outside the statute of limitations and outside our jurisdiction."   Mr. Filippi was the music director at St. Margaret of Scotland Roman Catholic Church in Selden for about six years, but was dismissed in 2001 for violating a policy against inviting young parishioners to his home.   The Rev. Chris Aridas, the pastor, said he fired Mr. Filippi after learning he had been alone with a child on at least one occasion. That child was not the girl Mr. Filippi raped, Father Aridas said.   He said the parents of the child who was raped came to him six months after Mr. Filippi was fired, with a troubling e-mail message their child had received from Mr. Filippi. The parents asked Father Aridas to speak with Mr. Filippi, said the priest, who called the district attorney's office instead.   http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/18/nyregion/18ABUS.html?ex=3D1043904037&ei= =3D1&en=3Ddeb3fd71b20cb29f       HOW TO ADVERTISE --------------------------------- For information on advertising in e-mail newsletters or other creative advertising opportunities with The New York Times on the Web, please contact onlinesales@nytimes.com or visit our online media kit at http://www.nytimes.com/adinfo   For general information about NYTimes.com, write to help@nytimes.com.   Copyright 2002 The New York Times Company  
(back) Subject: Early Spanish Music From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 09:41:40 -0600   Hello All! Could anyone reccomend some specific volumes I could purchase in order to get a good selection of Early Spanish Music and the like by such composers as Cabezon, Cabanilles, Correa, etc? Volumes with multiple composers would be good as well as specific volumes within complete works sets.     As Always, Thanks for your help. Beau Surratt, Organist St. Peter's UCC, Elmhurst,IL Organ Performance Major, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb,IL      
(back) Subject: Re: RE.: MEDIOCRITY From: "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 11:50:49 -0400   I have to agree with respect to the contemporary music. Our church (United Church of Canada) started a "contemporary" service about six years ago held at 9:00am on Sunday mornings with a "traditional" service at 11:00am.   I have attended the contemporary services (rarely) and find them unbearable. The music is what I refer to as "ear candy" -- contemporary drivel with little or no musical value (not that all contemporary music fits that description!) and words that have had all beauty and majesty knocked out of them through the ruthless application of inclusive language and the avoidance of any "guilt-imposing" undertones (e.g., don't ever mention "sin"). Any prayers have music playing underneath which I find distracting -- I end up listening to the music rather than the prayer.   As for installing a bar in the choir room, our contemporary service does serve coffee and muffins in the vestibule which worshipers are invited to bring into the sanctuary during "worship?"   This, to me, is "drive-thru" ministry at its finest. I find that most of the adherents tend to be upwardly mobile professional "transients" (here for a year or two, then off to the next promotion) and seem to have very little respect for a house of worship. The focus is convenience -- come as you are, worship with sound-bytes (music-bytes?) and breakfast, then on to the day's next activity.   Unfortunately, the contemporary model has, on many occasions in the past, spilled over into the traditional service. The result was that I, too, stayed away from church services for nearly 1 1/2 years. I'm back at it now and am bent on fighting this from the inside. Now I'm just careful about when I go to church. For example I find that I can't attend combined services any more -- just too unpredictable in terms of liturgy style.   We have a 3-manual 56-stop instrument that is beautiful (even though it's digital). You can take all the contemporary piano/keyboard/drums/whatever-other-instrument-you-want-to-add stuff but for Christmas service, our music director used David Willcocks' arrangement of "O Come All Ye Faithful." with near full-organ on the final verse (he's still shy about adding reeds). IMHO there can be no comparison made between the two in terms of inspiring a congregation and singing praise to God.   Andrew Barss Halifax, Nova Scotia   On Saturday, January 18, 2003, at 02:13 AM, D. Keith Morgan wrote:   > I would much rather go to a church and hear someone > play Ellen Jane Lorenz well than to hear him butcher > the major works which are far beyond his reach > technically. > > As for the "contemporary" crap we have inflicted on > us, I would simply prefer to attend a service where > there was no music than to have to listen to this > guitar twanging and drum-beating shit. > > I think that if this junk doesn't go out-of-style > soon, we will need to have a bar installed in the > choir room so that anyone attending the services who > has any musical taste at all can at least fortify > himself with a martini before having to hear such a > noise. > > I am really enjoying church services these days. I > stay the hell away from them. > > D. Keith Morgan > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. > http://mailplus.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Fred Astaire From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 16:08:49 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I don't use heels a lot in Bach, but I sure do for the opening of the D Major Prelude and Fugue....and I bet Bach did!   Only Fred Astaire or Virgil "twinkle toes" Fox could have managed "toes only" without kicking themselves to death.   Give me a Pedal to Great coupler anyday!   Talking of which, do they have any of these in the USA? They would make the Middelschulte "Perpetuem Mobile" a breeze!   With a suitable sequencer/recording thing....I could have an adoring fan club if I just moved my feet around and flung my arms in the air as the organ played itself.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > there is no piece that bach wrote that requires use > of the heel.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Mediocrity and church music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 10:35:51 -0600   Colin has said my feelings in part much better than I could. I agree with all of you and none of you, so have temporarily lost the good sense to keep my mouth shut (it leaves me more and more often these days).   Worship encompasses many things. If one looks at the service in a traditional prayer book, we start out with acknowledgement and praise of God as the omnipotent, omniscient Being. Then we listen to passages from his Word, and generally a minister's interpretation. Then we affirm our own faith, followed immediately by prayers for others and ourselves and confession of our own sins, followed by absolution. Then, clothed in his righteousness, we enter into communion with our God, and leave to love and serve him.   Music for the church must uplift hearts and raise them to another level of consciousness of God, to prepare and lead them through these steps of worship. This includes planning and preparation of the prelude, hymns, service music, interludes, anthems, and postludes. The music should attempt to match the message and mood of the service and all its various parts, to help draw it all into a cohesive whole. That means that being a church organist encompasses more than sitting down at a console on Sunday.   I deplore hearing organists massacre great works of literature, yet I also despise those who never aspire to play anything other than easy literature that they can sight-read on Sunday. No, we cannot all play the Wedge or Tournemire (I for one cannot and never will, but applied my efforts at the age of 30 to learn to play what I could of classical repertoire as well as I could and present it, mainly in church). I realize that some will never play Bach or the like at services, but still should aspire to inspire worship and strive to improve their talents to effectuate this end. If we believe in God, then he/she/it deserves our very best efforts. If God is good and encompasses beauty, then our music must reflect that beauty, and should be carefully selected with that goal in mind. My own services were nothing special as to difficulty, but tried each week to accomplish what I have described here.   I disagree with much of the attempts to segregate music into church or recital repertoire. Much of the organ music repertoire CAN effectively be used at church, and indeed will probably only be heard by the masses if played in church. If you want to draw more people to the organ, that is where you must start. If people associate "organ music" with trite ditties at church, baseball fields, or massacred Bach, as I did growing up, then the task is all but lost from the start. You will find that in many congregations without a good pastor/celebrant/preacher, the music may be the only means of conveying the worship. That elevates the organist to neither tyrant nor demagogue, but remands him or her to status of servant with great responsibility.   I realize that all my blathering presupposes that one believes in an omnipotent and omniscient God. If one doesn't, then it would be difficult to accomplish the task. I sometimes think, when I visit other churches, that I can tell a lot just from listening how the organist conceives of God.   I finally left my position and church of 17 years because battling the Godless (or as Colin mentioned, the "God in the gaps") nature of belief in the Episcopal Church just finally sucked the will out of me, and I found I could not return to the spontaneous haphazardness of many of the Protestant churches here. Now I am turning those energies to the courtroom and advocating for children (with mixed results), but miss the organ greatly, although I still talk to God regularly. Every day I await news from list members of what they did in church on Sunday and meaningful discussion of the music of our instrument, and am disappointed by the lack of news of uplifting services filled with great music, or interesting discussion of the organ and its music.   Where are you, organists?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and wierd music From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 11:44:46 EST     --part1_133.19b5739d.2b5ade7e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/18/03 7:28:43 AM Eastern Standard Time, mike3247@earthlink.net writes:     That's because you didn't get a good enough whiff. You have to get close enough to inhale you know--just ask Bill   Alas, as my waistline will attest, the only thing I smoked was ham!   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502     --part1_133.19b5739d.2b5ade7e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica>In a message dated 1/18/03 7:28:43 AM = Eastern Standard Time, mike3247@earthlink.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR>That's because you didn't get a good enough whiff. <BR>You have to get close enough to inhale you know--just <BR>ask Bill<FONT SIZE=3D3> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Alas, as my waistline will attest, the only thing I smoked was ham! <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_133.19b5739d.2b5ade7e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Early Spanish Music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 10:45:35 -0600   Beau, I don't know if this Spanish music is early enough for you, but in 1996 I heard Guy Bovet play some of the music of Jose Lidon (1748-1827) at St. Michael's in NYC. He has helped edit a book of Lidon's works: Obras Completas para Organo: 6 piezas sueltas y 4 piezas para la Misa, published by Schola Cantorum, circa 1993.   This is some interesting music, but I believe all manuals. I would recommend it, even though the volume is a little pricey (I think mine was about $40 US).   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com