PipeChat Digest #3395 - Wednesday, January 22, 2003
 
RE: Gamble hinge tape
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: British mediocrity
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Fwd: Van Hulse Toccata Op. 39
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Van Hulse Toccata Op. 39
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: Twice is enough
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: British mediocrity
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Waldorf-Astoria Moller
  by "rnewman" <rnewman@shop.rutgers.edu>
RE: British mediocrity
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Hymn for Candlemas (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: British mediocrity
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: MEDIOCRITY
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
wedding hymns (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Hinge tape
  by "Chapman Gonz=E1lez" <chapmanp@comcast.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Gamble hinge tape From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 21:59:33 -0500   > For those of us who have used it for years, its hard to believe that its no longer available.   That was my discovery last time I checked. It shocked me, too. I'd be interested in whether there is an equivalent.   Preserving music for re-use is not in a publisher's interest. Apparently, not enough choir directors consider what they have bought to have = permanent value to go to the trouble of buying and using such products, either-- = never mind that every copy might cost ten times what it did a generation ago.   Ya can't take anything like that for granted anymore. The times they are a'changin'.   Paul (who still believes that all choral copies worth buying are worth binding = in manila folders)      
(back) Subject: RE: British mediocrity From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 21:06:24 -0500   Colin Mitchell writes:   >Good British organ music?   >Well.....certainly Stanford (Irish actually), Bridge, Bairstow, Norman Cocker (of Tuba Tune fame), Simon Preston (Alleluyas) and Francis Jackson (the excellent "Diversion for Mixtures" of considerable difficulty, the fine "Toccata, Choral and Fuge" and the ever lovely "Impromptu" written for Sir Edward Bairstow, to mention just a few of his works.   >Now a question, where did Peter Racine Fricker hail from? If he was English, then he wrote a strange, but rather haunting "Pastoral".   That is indeed a haunting piece. I have a recording and the score but = have never taken the time to learn it properly. It's rather challenging, at least for a Pastoral.   > Almost certainly, the greatest work is the "Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue" by Healey Willan, performed to perfection by Dr Francis Jackson at York Minster, on the old EMI-Great Cathedral Organs series, vinyl recording. (They were close friends)   You have now mentioned three pieces from that single recording (also = Cocker and Jackson's own Diversion). Not surprising-- I've always loved it, too. But wasn't Willan living in Canada when he composed that piece? I usually consider him Canadian, although of course he was born and raised British. Wasn't this piece inspired by/intended for the organ at Saint Paul's in Toronto? John Tuttle made another very impressive recording of it (on CD) there ten-to-fifteen years ago.   If you like Jackson's music (yes, so do I, and it's probably under-rated, although I still prefer Leighton), do you know his toccata in B minor? It appeared on an old Argo recording of evensong from King's, made in Boris Ord's day, whose Mag and Nunc was Stanford in G. Again, I have the music but haven't learned it. It must be twenty pages, but they go fast.   My point earlier was less to assert that Howells, Mathias, and Leighton = were great organ composers (although I do like all three very much) than to ask what has been written *since* of equal caliber. It strikes me that you could rely upon even the gentle Gebrauchsmusik of Willan, Stanford, and = some of the others you mention (might we add Sir George Dyson?) to be solidly crafted and gracious. I made the acquaintance of much of this in the late 1960s and early 70s, as a student, when I set aside about a dollar a day = for music through the RSCM. English music was considerably cheaper than American music in those days, and the money went a long way. The = situation was an Anglophile's delight; I pored over many publishers' catalogs and ordered heaps of it, some by names completely new to me, e.g. Steele, Leighton, Joubert, or Fricker. The arrival of a substantial parcel of = organ or choral music from England, wrapped in brown paper and tied up with = twine, was a high point of every month. One day in the summer of '68, from maybe = a dozen members of a Novello series of contemporary organ music that I had acquired, none of which I had then heard either live or recorded, I picked out Leighton's Prelude, Scherzo, and Passacaglia almost at random to = learn, and I think hit the jackpot-- never stopped loving that composer.   Nowadays, the most active publisher of contemporary British organ music-- for service use, anyway-- seems to be Kevin Mayhew, but it is = disappointing, even rather shocking, how slapdash most of this material is compared to a generation ago. The contents-- presumably by some of the most reputable church musicians in the country, various cathedral organists etc.-- seem = to be facile transcriptions of short improvisations with no subsequent tightening up or refinement at all. I must admit to playing from them occasionally when the hymns on which they are based are sung in a service, because they are handy and not difficult, but I tend to feel rather cheap doing so-- not to mention that Mayhew sees fit to issue its stuff in bindings that not even a heavy hymnal on each side can reliably keep open = on the rack! If (as I fear) this is symptomatic of an abandonment of standards in the Church of England generally (though still with a few blessed shining exceptions), it's really cause for grief.      
(back) Subject: Fwd: Van Hulse Toccata Op. 39 From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 07:43:59 -0600   We have received the following note at the Administration account. If you can be of any help to the Symphony please reply to the address below as the questioner is not a member of the list.   David     >X-Sent-via: StarNet http://www.azstarnet.com/ >Subject: Van Hulse Toccata Op. 39 >Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 06:39:38 -0700 >Thread-Topic: Van Hulse Toccata Op. 39 >Thread-Index: AcLBUtQ3p4/+Lc15S1W0T9NwcJY9YQ=3D=3D >From: "Steve Gamble" <sgamble@tucsonsymphony.org> >To: <admin@pipechat.org> >Sender: <admin@pipechat.org> > >Greetings Administrator, > >Would it be possible to do me a huge favor and ask your list if they >know of a recording of this piece? Camil Van Hulse was the first >conductor of >the Tucson Symphony back in 1929. So we get requests for information >about him from time to time. Unfortunately we're not an abundant >resource. Thanks for any help. > >Steve Gamble, Librarian >Tucson Symphony Orchestra >2175 N. 6th Ave. >Tucson, AZ 85705 >sgamble@tucsonsymphony.org >520-792-9155 x118 >520-792-9314 fax >520-991-7056 cel     -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Van Hulse Toccata Op. 39 From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 09:35:02 EST     --part1_7e.344cb7fe.2b5eb496_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hey, David.   Joyce Jones may be of some help on Van Hulse since she has championed his works for many years and regularly plays his wonderful piece as a concert finale. I don't have her e-mail, but I'm sure of the zillions of people = who read this, surely someone must.   Yours,   Darryl   --part1_7e.344cb7fe.2b5eb496_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0">Hey, David.<BR> <BR> Joyce Jones may be of some help on Van Hulse since she has championed his = works for many years and regularly plays his wonderful piece as a concert = finale. I don't have her e-mail, but I'm sure of the zillions of people = who read this, surely someone must.<BR> <BR> Yours,<BR> <BR> Darryl</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7e.344cb7fe.2b5eb496_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Twice is enough From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 15:26:23 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Good to know that Sand is back home.   If Sand would let us know when I can tell my hilarious story.....I don't want to be the one who sends him back into the ICU.   Regards and love to Sand,   Colin Mitchell UK>   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: British mediocrity From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 15:42:48 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I think that Healey Willan used to say that he was, "English by birth, Canadian by adoption and Scotch by absorption".   I had the great pleasure of meeting him once.   I am not sure of the country lineage or pedigree, but Johann Nepukem (Sp?) David wrote some difficult organ music and lived in Dorset, England.   I once looked at an organ score and almost had a seizure! (Tomorrow is another day!)   I must investigate Leighton more thoroughly......   Contemporary composers?   I just don't know anything of substance having being written in the UK other than works by Francis Jackson, who continues to compose well into his 80's.     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote: >     > You have now mentioned three pieces from that single > recording (also Cocker > and Jackson's own Diversion). Not surprising-- I've > always loved it, too. > But wasn't Willan living in Canada when he composed > that piece? I usually > consider him Canadian, although of course he was > born and raised British.   > If you like Jackson's music (yes, so do I, and it's > probably under-rated, > although I still prefer Leighton), do you know his > toccata in B minor?>   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Waldorf-Astoria Moller From: "rnewman" <rnewman@shop.rutgers.edu> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 12:16:49 -0500       Hi list,   I was reading last night online about the Waldorf-Astoria moller installed in the NYC hotel in1931 and removed sometime in the 1950's. Somewhere it mentioned that the organ is currently (this was probably written a few years back) in storage in Montclair, NJ. Any idea who owns it or if there are any plans for it?   -Randy      
(back) Subject: RE: British mediocrity From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 13:50:15 -0500   Colin Mitchell writes:   > I am not sure of the country lineage or pedigree, but Johann Nepukem (Sp?) David wrote some difficult organ music and lived in Dorset, England.   That is very interesting. Johann Nepomuk David was Austrian, I think, and was living in Leipzig during World War II. His partita "Unuberwindlich starke Held, Sankt Michael" was written at that time. The desperate = terror and supplication one would feel being in a city onto which bombs are = raining down is captured marvelously in the first movement, I think. It's a wonderful piece for Michaelmas. His son, Thomas Christian David, wrote a piece called "Dux Michael" that seems to be based on the same chorale. I don't know of any other organ settings of this melody than those two. I didn't know that he ever lived in England.   > I once looked at an organ score and almost had a seizure! (Tomorrow is another day!)   His best-known partita from Choralwerk is, I understand (none of them are very well known in America), "Es ist ein Schnitter". It certainly = qualifies as difficult. The hardest section of all, in my experience, is a mere bicinium over a pedal ostinato in the last movement. The two hands go = all over the place in rapid figurations. Unfortunately, I seem to have lost = my copy of this partita.       > -----Original Message----- > From: Colin Mitchell [SMTP:cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk] > Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 10:43 AM > To: PipeChat > Subject: RE: British mediocrity > > Hello, > > I think that Healey Willan used to say that he was, > "English by birth, Canadian by adoption and Scotch by > absorption". > > I had the great pleasure of meeting him once. > > I am not sure of the country lineage or pedigree, but > Johann Nepukem (Sp?) David wrote some difficult organ > music and lived in Dorset, England. > > I once looked at an organ score and almost had a > seizure! (Tomorrow is another day!) > > I must investigate Leighton more thoroughly...... > > Contemporary composers? > > I just don't know anything of substance having being > written in the UK other than works by Francis Jackson, > who continues to compose well into his 80's. > > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > --- "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote: > > > > > You have now mentioned three pieces from that single > > recording (also Cocker > > and Jackson's own Diversion). Not surprising-- I've > > always loved it, too. > > But wasn't Willan living in Canada when he composed > > that piece? I usually > > consider him Canadian, although of course he was > > born and raised British. > > > If you like Jackson's music (yes, so do I, and it's > > probably under-rated, > > although I still prefer Leighton), do you know his > > toccata in B minor?> > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Everything you'll ever need on one web page > from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts > http://uk.my.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Hymn for Candlemas (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 13:09:18 -0800   I needed a communion hymn for Candlemas, so I set "In His Temple Now Behold Him" to "Divinum mysterium" with the "evermore and evermore" refrain. If anybody wants it, msg. me pvt. and specify Sibelius or PDF file. It's already going out to my music download list, so if you're on that, you don't need to do anything.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: British mediocrity From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 17:33:33 EST     --part1_10.2b9279ef.2b5f24bd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/20/2003 4:43:07 PM Eastern Standard Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:     > Now a question, where did Peter Racine Fricker hail > from? If he was English, then he wrote a strange, but > rather haunting "Pastoral". >   I don't guess that he is/was related to the H A Fricker who transcribed = the Sibelius "Finlandia" published by Schott, eH?   Rick in VA   --part1_10.2b9279ef.2b5f24bd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/20/2003 4:43:07 PM Eastern Standard Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Now a question, = where did Peter Racine Fricker hail <BR>from? &nbsp;If he was English, then he wrote a strange, but <BR>rather haunting "Pastoral". <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I don't guess that he is/was related to the H A Fricker who = transcribed the Sibelius "Finlandia" published by Schott, eH? <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_10.2b9279ef.2b5f24bd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: MEDIOCRITY From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 15:40:26 -0700       Andrew Barss wrote: > > An organist acquaintance of mine was visiting in Germany this summer. > She reported about one organ she visited that had a drawstop with no > name specified. Apparently drawing that stop would open a drawer in the > console revealing a fully-stocked liquor cabinet! > > I don't remember the instrument but have no reason to doubt the story. > > Andrew Barss > Halifax, Nova Scotia   One organ so equipped is the Rieger in Ratzeburg. The knob is labeled "Rauschwerk" which in German provides some interesting word play on the contents of a mini bar.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: wedding hymns (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 16:11:01 -0800   (1) Lord, Who At Cana's Wedding Feast (Kingsfold) (2) O Perfect Love (Charterhouse)   We have the wedding at Cana for the Gospel this Sunday, so I'm rummaging around in the wedding hymns in the computer. If anybody would like copies, pvt. me and indicate Sibelius or PDF. I'm sending them to my download list.   O Perfect Love to Charterhouse ALMOST redeems the text (chuckle)!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Hinge tape From: "Chapman Gonz=E1lez" <chapmanp@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 20:07:03 -0500   Thanks to the large number of you who responded to my question about = Gamble Hinge tape. I have, through your help, discovered something at The = Library Store (on the web at <www.thelibrarystore.com>) that appears to be roughly the same product and have ordered some today. I will report to the list after I've tried it.   Again, its great to be able to get such competent help when one needs it. These lists are so helpful. Thanks, everyone.   Chapman in Baltimore