PipeChat Digest #3418 - Friday, January 31, 2003
 
Re: Morning Prayer
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put to the test
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: Morning Prayer
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 (long!)
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
IT'S VERY SIMPLE...Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put to the test
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 (long!)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: Morning Prayer
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 (long!)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Morning Prayer From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 09:13:12 -0800   Before the Reformation (WAY before the Reformation) there were two streams of the Divine Office: the monastic, which St. Benedict simplified from the Desert Fathers in the sixth century (the Desert Fathers said all 150 Psalms every DAY; St. Benedict reduced that to every WEEK; Archbishop Cranmer reduced it to once a MONTH in the Book of Common Prayer), and a simpler Office that was used by parish churches and the secular clergy.   A succession of Benedictine popes imposed the monastic office on the entire Church.   I don't know for certain, but it would SEEM that Morning and Evening Prayer didn't spring full-blown from Archbishop Cranmer's head ... I would imagine that he had SOME familiarity with the earlier simple Office.   As to what the parishes did, we know from the various Books of the Hours that have survived that Vespers, at least, was a popular Office. A lot of the macaronic tags of medieval carols and songs are the first lines of the most familiar Latin Vesper hymns.   Canons Regular in cathedrals had the obligation to chant the Office ... they were alloted food and drink and a "living" in payment, according to the ancient Minutes of Chapter.   The issue is further complicated (in England, at least) by the Old Foundation cathedrals that were also monastic communities.   I doubt that the full-blown Office was sung in village churches; on the other hand, at the Reformation the sung services were regarded as important enough that John Merbecke brought out his "Book of Common Praer Noted", which WAS simple enough to be sung by a couple of "clerkes" (tonsured chanters), or even a congregation, though from the small number of copies surviving, I doubt it was ever in the pews ... this was the era when the sole copy of the Bible in English was CHAINED to the lectern in the parish church.   Pre-Reformation, the Mass was regarded as Christ's service; Vespers (on account of the Magnificat) was regarded as Mary's service. That's why you find MOST of the musical compositions for the Office being written for Vespers ... Office Hymns, Magnificats, settings of the Final Anthems of the Blessed Virgin (Alma Redemptoris Mater, Ave Regina Caelorum, Regina Caeli, Salve Regina), etc.   Except for one early Polish baroque setting of Compline, I can't think of much written for the Office EXCEPT for Vespers ... certainly a setting like the Monteverdi was as elaborate as anything that was being performed at the Mass at that time.   England before the Reformation was known as "Mary's Dowry" ... the site of the apparition at Walsingham was a major place of pilgrimage. Despite the best efforts of the Puritans, the English simply transferred their veneration of the Virgin to Evensong, which in some places in England remains the principal Sunday service to this day. English composers switched from writing Latin settings of Salve Regina, etc., to writing large-scale Magnificats in English, and life went on as usual (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote: > > Just an academic question occasioned by the recent mentions of the place = of > Morning (and Evening, I suppose) Prayer in Anglican parishes. > > Before the Reformation, were these services sung by ordinary parishes at > all? Or were they purely monastic offices, sung at cathedrals and such > foundations? > > How, then (and, more to the point, WHY) did they become parish services > after the Reformation? (A very similar thing happened in Lutheranism, = of > course; I should look up that history and ask how parallel it is to the = same > shift in Anglicanism, I guess.) > > Alan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put to the test From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 12:15:18 -0500   Hi, Y'all!   At Coral Ridge (Presbyterian Church) it never was a problem since the = wedding policy stated, "one of the CRPC organists will play for your = wedding. Please schedule the organist after your date has been cleared, = etc., etc., etc. . . . ." So, usually Colin or I, or Becky or I, or I, = would play nearly all of the weddings at the Church. I enjoyed playing the = funerals for the families of the Church, and since I usually had more = "history" with the family, I played the majority of the funerals. That was = o.k. For weddings, we usually shared the responsibility and the pay ($250 = which included a consultation during working hours or phone consultation = plus rehearsal).   For other churches I have served, it was always in the wedding policy that = the church organist (me) would play the weddings. When it was requested, I = would allow others to play the prelude music, but I ALWAYS PLAYED THE = PROCESSIONAL AND RECESSIONAL. The clergy and the wedding coordinator = always wanted it this way. I agree. And, of course, I always received my = full fee.   That's how I've handled this issue over the past 25 years or so.   I wish you well. And you know what? I think it's o.k. for Aunt Nellie or a = favorite musician from their family or friend to play as long as they have = the necessary skills. And how do you determine if that person has the = skill? That's another topic for another day!!!!!!!!   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea  
(back) Subject: Re: Morning Prayer From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:04:20 -0500   On 1/31/03 12:13 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> = wrote:   > Before the Reformation (WAY before the Reformation) there were two > streams of the Divine Office: the monastic, which St. Benedict > simplified from the Desert Fathers in the sixth century (the Desert > Fathers said all 150 Psalms every DAY; St. Benedict reduced that to > every WEEK; Archbishop Cranmer reduced it to once a MONTH in the Book of > Common Prayer), and a simpler Office that was used by parish churches > and the secular clergy. > > A succession of Benedictine popes imposed the monastic office on the > entire Church. > > I don't know for certain, but it would SEEM that Morning and Evening > Prayer didn't spring full-blown from Archbishop Cranmer's head ... I > would imagine that he had SOME familiarity with the earlier simple > Office.   Oh, certainly; my recollection is that Morning Prayer was a conflation of Lauds, Matins, and Prime. And Evening Prayer similarly from Vespers and Compline. (Oddly--or perhaps not--just NOW Compline is coming back in its own right/rite (St. Mark's, Seattle, for example), and its loss from EP = made up for by the revival of the Lucenarium at the beginning of the office.) > > As to what the parishes did, we know from the various Books of the Hours > that have survived that Vespers, at least, was a popular Office. A lot > of the macaronic tags of medieval carols and songs are the first lines > of the most familiar Latin Vesper hymns.   I thought Books of the Hours were for private devotion rather than corporate. > > Canons Regular in cathedrals had the obligation to chant the Office ... > they were alloted food and drink and a "living" in payment, according to > the ancient Minutes of Chapter. > > The issue is further complicated (in England, at least) by the Old > Foundation cathedrals that were also monastic communities.   "Complicated," or perhaps just multiplied? > > I doubt that the full-blown Office was sung in village churches; on the > other hand, at the Reformation the sung services were regarded as > important enough that John Merbecke brought out his "Book of Common > Praer Noted", which WAS simple enough to be sung by a couple of > "clerkes" (tonsured chanters), or even a congregation, though from the > small number of copies surviving, I doubt it was ever in the pews ... > this was the era when the sole copy of the Bible in English was CHAINED > to the lectern in the parish church.   As today is the phone book in a phone booth in better hotels, etc. = Purpose not to make it UNavailable, but to assure its CONTINUED availability. > > Pre-Reformation, the Mass was regarded as Christ's service; Vespers (on > account of the Magnificat) was regarded as Mary's service. That's why > you find MOST of the musical compositions for the Office being written > for Vespers ... Office Hymns, Magnificats, settings of the Final Anthems > of the Blessed Virgin (Alma Redemptoris Mater, Ave Regina Caelorum, > Regina Caeli, Salve Regina), etc. > > Except for one early Polish baroque setting of Compline, I can't think > of much written for the Office EXCEPT for Vespers ... certainly a > setting like the Monteverdi was as elaborate as anything that was being > performed at the Mass at that time. > > England before the Reformation was known as "Mary's Dowry" ... the site > of the apparition at Walsingham was a major place of pilgrimage. Despite > the best efforts of the Puritans, the English simply transferred their > veneration of the Virgin to Evensong, which in some places in England > remains the principal Sunday service to this day. English composers > switched from writing Latin settings of Salve Regina, etc., to writing > large-scale Magnificats in English, and life went on as usual (grin). > Bud: Thanks a bunch. Uncharacteristically, I've dug out a resource on = the subject, and have just begun to check it out. Maybe I'll have more add soonly. Any validity to my (hugely over-simplified) suspicion that the Office was the successor to the synagogue, and the mass the successor to Temple worship?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 (long!) From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:08:24 -0800 (PST)   Hi, List.   A few thoughts on Candlemas/Purification, and a service list for you.   February 2 has for many centuries been observed in Western Christianity as =93Candlemas,=94 Candle-Mass, or, more formally, The Purification. It falls forty days after December 25, the day our ancient forebears assigned for the Nativity of the Lord. Both days, it turns out, are also highly significant in ancient paganism, which helps explain their selection as Christian holidays. (Remember, the Bible doesn=92t mention when exactly Jesus was born.)   In pre-Christian Celtic Europe, the first three days of February represented a kind of Triduum of Light. With the noticeable return of daylight, we are also at the mid-point between Solstice and Equinox. Pagans to this day celebrate February First as a =93cross-quarter day.=94 Speaking for Irish paganism, February First was not only the first day of spring, but was the feast of the goddess Imbolc, the goddess of spring, birth, and the nursing of babies=97her name means =93ewe=92s = milk.=94   The ancient Irish church replaced Imbolc with Saint Brigid, who was possibly the first female bishop in the church=92s history. (A former high priestess of the old religion, she was converted and, as the story goes, was to have been consecrated a Virgin, but the consecrating bishop =93accidentally=94 made her a bishop instead, to the delight of her legion of female followers, who also converted!) To this day, rituals that honored Imbolc are now offered to Brigid. In the West of Ireland, women bring their daughters to flowing water and leave candles. Candles, a symbol of returning light. Saint Brigid=92s nuns preserved a sacred fire in Kildare=97not to be seen by males!!=97until Henry VIII ordered it extinguished.   It kind of makes one think of the male priesthood as new-fangled, and equality of the sexes as the Old Way, doesn=92t it?   The next day, Purification, or Candle-Mass, again focuses on the symbolism of returning light. Candles per se have nothing to do with Mary=92s =93churching=94 forty days after giving birth; she offered a pair = of turtledoves, not candles (or oil lamps!). And the connection to Simeon=92s words =93a light of revelation for the Gentiles=94 which are = the Gospel of the day are really just a convenient cover for a much more ancient (and beloved) practice. On this day, also, the Western church historically blessed *all* the candles meant to be burned in church all year!   You=92re going to laugh now, but it=92s true: Groundhog=92s Day is also a survival of this ancient triduum of light. On February Second a groundhog will supposedly emerge from hibernation and look for his (her) shadow. The weather is forecast by whether he/she see it or not. But on this day, in ancient European belief, the bear-god emerged from hiberation=97the bear-god, which was Europe=92s version of the god Seth, guardian of the underworld. Death was defeated and Life reaffirmed. (The greco-roman myth of Persephone/Proserpine is another version of this.) The ancient Armenian church had a fire-purification ritual on this day, and predicted the weather from the smoke. More fire, more weather! The Latin word =93februare=94 means =93to purify.=94   The Third of February is Saint Blase Day. As a Catholic boy in New York, I was lined up every February Third with the rest of the school and our throats were blessed with crossed...CANDLES. =93By the intercession of Blase, bishop and martyr, may God protect you from diseases of the throat and from every other illness, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.=94   Why?   Saint Blase, bishop (of Sebaste) and martyr, is said to have saved a child=92s life while in prison awaiting martyrdom. The child was choking on a fish-bone, and Blase extracted it from the boy's throat=97hence his subsequent =93specialty=94 in protecting our throats! (I must remember to get my throat blessed this year=97I actually miss the custom, and with my sinuses, I can=92t get too much help.) No candles figure anywhere in the story.   So there=92s more to the story, and to the candles that symbolize Blase. Blase seems to have replaced the older figure of Merlin in Celtic Christianity...Merlin the magician and healer. In early sources, one =93Blase=94 is called the =93maister=94 or teacher of Merlin. In old = Germanic etymology, =93Blase=94 and =93blaze=94 are a pun as they are in modern = English. You=92ll have to consult my old friend Fr. Dennis O=92Neill, a priest of the Archdiocese of Chicago and a scholar of Celtic paganism and mythology, for all the details on this. But, predictably, story bled over into story, and there is no coincidence in the three-day progression of Brigid, Mary, and Blase, and the candles that symbolize all three of them. All three have to do with the historic First Day(s) of Spring, and the return of light to the earth.   (Think about it. You still observe this old calendar. =93In the Bleak Mid-winter=94 implies November First as the first day of winter, doesn=92t it? How can it be =93midwinter=94 if it=92s four days after the season starts? And when is =93Midsummer Day=94 if not June 21st, exactly = half-way through a summer that starts on May First? And why is August First =93Lammas=94 or =93loaf-mass=94 if not to serve as a first fruits harvest festival? I=92m not quite sure when our seasons were shifted to fall ON the solistices, but it never used to be that way! Notice the old church days on the old season-days. February 1, May 1, August 1, and November 1 all contain(ed) significance for a liturgical Christian. But only the spring equinox matters otherwise, and that only to determine the date of Easter.)   What I=92ve told you is what I have learned by working with Fr. O=92Neill. =   If you want to corroborate any of it, there are countless websites you could visit as a start. Some are cheezy and unreliable, others are pretty good. Here is one you might like: http://www.earthsky.com/2000/esmi000202.html       Anyhow, The Church of the Epiphany may be a liturgically excellent Rite II church, but we=92re definitely not pagans! Our celebration of the Purification on this Sunday will be free of explicit pagan references; no one will bow to Imbolc, no one will worship Seth or the Bear-God, or Goddess help us, Merlin! AND we don=92t much care whether Punxatawney Phil sees his shadow or not! I=92m just offering the above comments to show how fascinating I find the ancient roots of Christian practice. I think we=92re the stronger for it=97a more literally Incarnational faith=97and though there=92s no such person as Imbolc, Jesus is alive, and lives our history with us, and our very Cultural Baggage becomes holy!   Light the candles, bless your throats, go to a river, watch that groundhog, and praise the Lord!   SO........with that:     The Feast of the Purification February 2, 2003 The Church of the Epiphany, NYC     Organ Prelude: Ave Maria, Ave Maris Stella Jean Langlais   Processional Hymn: 257 O Zion, open wide thy gates (Edmonton)   Gloria: S278, William Mathias   Psalm: Single chant, Farrant in F; Psalm, =93Quam dilecta=94, 84:1-6 pointed as per "Anglican Chant Psalter"   Sequence Hymn: 259 Hail to the Lord who comes (Old 120th)   Gospel Acclamation: The Celtic Alleluia (No, I didn=92t choose it for Celtic reasons!)   Offertory Anthem: Nunc Dimittis (for tenor solo, mixed choir and organ) (Luke 2:29-32, RSV) Jonathan Hall   Sanctus: S128, William Mathias   Communion Hymn: 497 How bright appears the Morning Star (Wie sch=F6n leuchtet)   Recessional Hymn: 446 Praise to the holiest in the height (Newman)   Organ Postlude: Entree from =93Suite Medievale=94 Jean Langlais   --------end------------    
(back) Subject: IT'S VERY SIMPLE...Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put to the test From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:14:09 EST     --part1_129.21b59f37.2b6c16f1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/31/03 8:49:55 AM Central Standard Time, tcarter215@yahoo.com writes:   > For those of you that have right of first refusal on > weddings written into your contracts, what do you do > when the couple wants to have a family member play? > Do you charge your regular fee anyway, a reduced fee > or none whatsoever? I'm in this situation for the > first time at my new position (an upper upper middle > class congregation, whereas I'm slaving away for a > living) and don't know what the proper thing to do is. > Any shared experience or advice would be most helpful     It's very simple:   1) you tell them the church policy which, I assume, is to your benefit and =   states that if an outside organist is requested, that you (the staff organist) approve of them and that you will still receive your full fee   2) find out WHO they want and WHAT their experience is. If they sound like = a left-footed ninny then you can say "well this is a very specialized instrument and is rather complex. Perhaps it would be best if our staff organist played for you and Aunt Suzie contributed to your special day in another manner."   3) if you approve them then you tell the couple that church policy states that the staff organist receive his full fee   4) if they squawk then you say, again: "I am sorry for the confusion, however, the church policy states that an outside organist must be = approved and that the staff organist must still receive his full fee. If that = isn't satisfactory then I will be happy to play for your ceremony. Is there anything else I can assist you with today?"   5) if they threaten to go "right to the pastor on this," then respond with =   "would you like for me to show you to his office?" or "would you like for = me to dial his telephone extension for you?"   That generally ends it right there, if it even goes that far. Of course, there are those bride's mothers who think they rule the world and can make =   their OWN policies. A bit more challenging indeed, but BOY do I have fun with them!!! heheh   Scott F. Foppiano, Austin, TX Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.   --part1_129.21b59f37.2b6c16f1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 1/31/03 8:49:55 AM Central = Standard Time, tcarter215@yahoo.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">For those of you = that have right of first refusal on<BR> weddings written into your contracts, what do you do<BR> when the couple wants to have a family member play? <BR> Do you charge your regular fee anyway, a reduced fee<BR> or none whatsoever? I'm in this situation for the<BR> first time at my new position (an upper upper middle<BR> class congregation, whereas I'm slaving away for a<BR> living) and don't know what the proper thing to do is.<BR> Any shared experience or advice would be most helpful</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> <BR> It's very simple:<BR> <BR> 1) you tell them the church policy which, I assume, is to your benefit and = states that if an outside organist is requested, that you (the staff = organist) approve of them and that you will still receive your full = fee<BR> <BR> 2) find out WHO they want and WHAT their experience is. If they sound like = a left-footed ninny then you can say "well this is a very specialized = instrument and is rather complex.&nbsp; Perhaps it would be best if our = staff organist played for you and Aunt Suzie contributed to your special = day in another manner."&nbsp; <BR> <BR> 3) if you approve them then you tell the couple that church policy states = that the staff organist receive his full fee<BR> <BR> 4) if they squawk then you say, again: "I am sorry for the confusion, = however, the church policy states that an outside organist must be approved and that the staff organist must still = receive his full fee.&nbsp; If that isn't satisfactory then I will be = happy to play for your ceremony.&nbsp; Is there anything else I can assist = you with today?"<BR> <BR> 5) if they threaten to go "right to the pastor on this," then respond with = "would you like for me to show you to his office?" or "would you like for = me to dial his telephone extension for you?"<BR> <BR> That generally ends it right there, if it even goes that far.&nbsp; Of = course, there are those bride's mothers who think they rule the world and = can make their OWN policies.&nbsp; A bit more challenging indeed, but BOY = do I have fun with them!!!&nbsp; heheh<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D4 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D"Monotype Corsiva" LANG=3D"0"><B>Scott = F. Foppiano</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></B>, = Austin, TX<BR> Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D"Monotype Corsiva" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_129.21b59f37.2b6c16f1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 (long!) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 12:22:46 -0600   Fascinating. I did my graduate work on the Anglo-Irish writers who = wrote autobiographies 1890-1920, during the troubles. So I know an = immense little about Celtic roots.   Maybe you could do your Nunc Dimittis at St. Paul's in March. Scott has = a fine tenor section leader.   P   Offertory Anthem: Nunc Dimittis (for tenor solo, mixed choir and organ) (Luke 2:29-32, RSV) Jonathan Hall   Sanctus: S128, William Mathias   Communion Hymn: 497 How bright appears the Morning Star =20 (Wie sch=F6n leuchtet)   Recessional Hymn: 446 Praise to the holiest in the height =20 (Newman)   Organ Postlude: Entree from "Suite Medievale" Jean Langlais   --------end------------     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: Morning Prayer From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:25:42 -0500   Bud notes:   > settings of the Final Anthems of the Blessed Virgin (Alma Redemptoris Mater, Ave Regina Caelorum, Regina Caeli, Salve Regina), etc.   These four are the prototype for what was meant by the rubric that goes = 'in quires and places where they sing, here followeth the anthem.'   I verified this a few years ago with Stephen Cleobury, when in a lecture = he discussed a particular setting of the Regina Coeli, mentioning that this would make "a good evensong anthem." I asked him if Regina Coeli weren't indeed just *A* good anthem, but one of *the* definitive evensong anthems. He said, "Of course. You're forgetting the English habit of understatement."    
(back) Subject: RE: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 (long!) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 12:30:45 -0600   Sorry, gang. That little note was intended to go only to Jonathan.   Peter      
(back) Subject: Re: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:40:12 -0500   On 1/31/03 1:08 PM, "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> wrote:   > February 2 has for many centuries been observed in Western Christianity > as =B3Candlemas,=B2 Candle-Mass, or, more formally, The Purification.   Even MORE formally, the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod used to call it "The Presentation of Our Lord and the Purification of Mary."   > With the noticeable return of daylight, we are also at the   approximate?   > mid-point between Solstice and Equinox.   Alan