PipeChat Digest #3419 - Friday, January 31, 2003
 
Re: IT'S VERY SIMPLE...Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put	to the te
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Free organ.. and concert reminder.
  by "Carol Scott" <dclscott@skyenet.net>
Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
RE: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Morning Prayer
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Re: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Re: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Todd Wilson Concert
  by <FLTim@aol.com>
Felix Hell in Berrien Springs, MI
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
 

(back) Subject: Re: IT'S VERY SIMPLE...Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put to the test From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:56:45 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3126866205_13018995 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 1/31/03 1:14 PM, "ScottFop@aol.com" <ScottFop@aol.com> wrote:   > 3) if you approve them then you tell the couple that church policy = states=3D that > the staff organist receive his full fee >=3D20 > 4) if they squawk then you say, again: "I am sorry for the confusion, = how=3D ever, > the church policy states that an outside organist must be approved and = th=3D at > the staff organist must still receive his full fee.   Oh, no, Scott. And, believe me, I hesitate immensely to disagree with you (thank goodness it=3DB9s a tiny = point).   > then you tell the couple that church policy states . . . >=3D20 > They should have known that, in writing, from a wedding booklet thingy = lo=3D ng > before this point. Don=3DB9t spring it on them at this point in the = conversa=3D tion; > it will only result in the =3DB3confusion=3DB2 to which you allude in = paragraph 4=3D .. > Avoid that. >=3D20 > I sure DO agree that while these things are a nuisance, it IS FUN to = figh=3D t > with bride=3DB9s momma! They think they know (and control) it all, and = it=3DB9s =3D good > to =3DB3clarify=3DB2 this little matter. >=3D20 > Alan >=3D20     --B_3126866205_13018995 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: IT'S VERY SIMPLE...Re: Weddings: right of first refusal put to = t=3D he test</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 1/31/03 1:14 PM, = &quot;ScottFop@aol.com&quo=3D t; &lt;ScottFop@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">3) if you approve them then you = tell =3D the couple that church policy states that the staff organist receive his = ful=3D l fee<BR> <BR> 4) if they squawk then you say, again: &quot;I am sorry for the confusion, = =3D however, the church policy states that an outside organist must be = approved =3D and that the staff organist must still receive his full fee. &nbsp;<BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Oh, no, Scott. &nbsp;And, = b=3D elieve me, I hesitate immensely to disagree with you (thank goodness = it&#821=3D 7;s = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D=   &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nb= s=3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;a tiny point). &nbsp;<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">then you tell the couple that = church =3D policy states . . . <BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">They should have known that, in = writing=3D , from a wedding booklet thingy long before this point. &nbsp;Don&#8217;t = sp=3D ring it on them at this point in the conversation; it will only result in = th=3D e &#8220;confusion&#8221; to which you allude in paragraph 4. &nbsp;Avoid = th=3D at.<BR> <BR> I sure DO agree that while these things are a nuisance, it IS FUN to fight = =3D with bride&#8217;s momma! &nbsp;They think they know (and control) it all, = a=3D nd it&#8217;s good to &#8220;clarify&#8221; this little matter.<BR> <BR> Alan<BR> </FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"BI Avant Garde DemiOblique"><BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3126866205_13018995--    
(back) Subject: Free organ.. and concert reminder. From: "Carol Scott" <dclscott@skyenet.net> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 14:09:07 -0500   Passing this on for a friend of a friend: Hammond M2console. Free. Located in Central Illinois. 309-454-1606. Must be picked up; some loading help available.   Also a reminder that Felix Hell is appearing in Berrien Springs, Michigan this Sunday (handy to Chicago and Northern Indiana). Email me for details if you're interested.   Carol Scott Stevensville United Methodist Church    
(back) Subject: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 11:44:36 -0800 (PST)   Dear List:   I hear a collective groan shuddering through the halls of Cyberland: =93Oh, God, no, not another Pipe Organ List on the Internet! What does this make, eight thousand or so??=94   Yes, I=92m afraid so. I have been thinking about this, and I feel that, the more the Computer and the Internet become part of our lives, the more specific and fine-grained will be our self-expression therein.   I have enjoyed being on PIPORG-L since 1996; and PipeChat since about 1998; and even to have lurked on OrganChat. I am told there are other lists too.   Most lists up to now seem to want to fall into either a =91serious=92 or a =91light=92 category. I keep wondering if I really fit into either one. I=92m a chatty, gregarious, extroverted, very verbal, highly degreed organist. At times I feel I don=92t fit in. When I feel like being chatty, or academic, I have to watch which list I post to, lest a certain lady or a certain gentleman take me to task publicly.   Maybe it=92s just me, but I=92m neither a lightweight nor a 900-lb = gorilla, and oftentimes (like this past week, for example), I=92ve been made to feel like both.   Hence, I have embarked on an experiment, and I emphasize it=92s an EXPERIMENT.   I have just created, thanks to Yahoo! Groups, a new, moderated internet list for *credentialed* organists. The normal minimum qualification for membership will be a master=92s degree in music or Associate level certification with one of the three major English-speaking organ societies. Membership is at the list owner=92s discretion, and one=92s credentialing is not to be seen either as a guarantee nor an absolute obstacle to participation. The list is *not* meant for beginners, hobbyists, or fans of the instrument--there are many other venues where you can shine.   I hope you will all take this experiment in the good spirit in which it was conceived. I think that the experience of high-level postgraduate training gives its, um, survivors a common language and common pool of experience that they may enjoy sharing together. The same idea that informs the famous University Club of New York. I don't like elitism, and I hope you won't see this list as elitist. But *we* need someplace to go too, I think.   At Indiana University, Bloomington, there was a great place for us on the third floor, the old Associate Instructor=92s Office amongst the organ practice rooms. We called it the =93AI Lounge=94, and hung out in = it at all hours....storing our organ shoes, scores, metronomes, and lunches there...pounding its old wretched piano...and so forth. For a while, the AI Lounge came under the domination of one or two ugly personalities, and it was more of a snakepit than a lounge...but I remember the times when I had some of the best conversations of my life there, fun *and* sophisticated, scholarly *and* full of laughter. I remember swapping jokes while playing the left hand parts of the Mahler 5 in full orchestral score (struggling furiously to keep up with the 19 year old who was sailing thru the top half of the page!!)   I=92m also very glad to reflect that the people who sparkled the brightest there have gone on to great things!   So, in the best spirit of the old AI lounge, I am opening, as of today, The Scholarly Organist Group. If you are an organist with high professional credentials, visit this website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scholorgroup/ and consider this a personal invitation to join and enjoy yourself.   You can also access the new list via my website, www.Jonathanbhall.com.   As List Owner, I do NOT intend for my personality or writings to dominate the list. I have other venues for that. But I do plan to participate, and to be myself!   I should also say that this new list is not intended to disparage or drain membership from established lists, but to provide a new and, I hope, creative alternative.   As I say, this list is an *experiment.* If it fails, it fails, no hard feelings and no excuses. But I=92m hoping it succeeds, and provides another avenue of conviviality for the seriously sociable, and the sociably serious.   With all best wishes to you all,   Jonathan    
(back) Subject: RE: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 14:58:24 -0500   Just three odds and ends to contribute:   For those who want to keep Christmas going as long as possible, Feb. 2 is the terminus. Then you've really got to pack those ornaments back away. = The first time I visited Paris was mid-to-late January. Street lamps were = still festooned with the municipal Christmas decorations. We'd never see them up this late in America, except on a few private porches whose owners are probably suspected by all passers-by simply as hopeless procrastinators.   Tournemire's Purification suite is one of the most beautiful. Lawrence Sears, late music critic in the Washington D.C. area, Librarian at Washington Cathedral, and organist at the Church of the Blessed Sacrament, considered it the crown jewel of the entire Orgue Mystique.   Candlemas lore reminds me of a charming little trilogy of books by William Mayne that I was lucky enough to pick up around 1970, when they were still available. Choristers' Cake, Cathedral Wednesday, and A Swarm in May all take place in a cathedral and its choir school-- a fictional cathedral, as = I recall, but closely modeled on Canterbury. In A Swarm in May, Candlemas = is a prominent event in the story because some of the candles are made from = wax taken from the cathedral's own bee hives maintained way up in the central tower, and every year one of the choristers is chosen to help the beekeeper-- an honor, but also a job with unusual challenges.   It would be nice to think that all this was true. Unfortunately, as a children's-librarian friend once explained to me, few American kids dig William Mayne, so none of his books are very easy to find over here. If you see any, grab them! How could anything like them ever be written or published again? This would be a nice weekend to re-read one of them.    
(back) Subject: Re: Morning Prayer From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:06:38 -0500   Hi Alan:   Morning Prayer and Mass In the Greek Orthodox tradition were intended to be an integral part of one service from beginning to end. They seem to hold to this tradition even today. The more pious arrive early for the extended service, but many arrive in time just for Mass.   There seems to be a parallel to the Greek service and the Service of English Catholics, but for some reason were split into two separate services, Morning Prayer, and then Mass, or Holy Communion.   Upon my cursory knowledge of English Cathedrals, originally of Monastic tradition, the Mass was not seen in the Nave of the church, but hidden behind the choir screen, very similar to the way the Greeks perform their services today. The Chancel Screen although not opaque today, seems to be a vestage of the time when the most sacred parts of the mass were said away from the curious eyes of the ordinary believers. The English Monastics allowed the choir, mostly monks and novices to fully view the Mass and sing the liturgy. The Greeks even exclude the Cantor and choir to sit outside the enclosure for Mass and not in full view of the priest, but sing the corresponding responses to his chanting.   To my understanding from the evidence left behind, The reverence for the Mass was such that it was held apart even by the English Monastics up to a certain point. IIRC all the English Monastics were offshoots of various Benedictine orders including Cistercians, and other various cloistered monks. It was they who began experimentation with a form of pipe organ as early as 870 AD in Winchester and as late as 1,361 AD in Halberstadt Germany to enhance the music and participation of the people. In the early church the Mass was said over the tomb of a known Christian Martyr. Today the altar, in Catholic Churches contains a stone, over which the priest places the chalace for Mass, relics of various known and recognized Saints. Thus the altar is a vestage of either Christ's or a Saints tomb. I find the symbolism fascinating.   Sincerely,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Comments on Candle-Mass, Feb 2 From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:52:49 -0500       Alan Freed wrote: > > On 1/31/03 1:08 PM, "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> = wrote: > > > February 2 has for many centuries been observed in Western = Christianity > > as 3Candlemas,2 Candle-Mass, or, more formally, The Purification. > > Even MORE formally, the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod used to call it = "The > Presentation of Our Lord and the Purification of Mary." >   Perhaps this Sunday there will be a stuffy cleric somewhere who will = announce, "......(a lesson)....for the Feast of the Purification of Mary, or, as the heathen = call it, 'Groundhog Day,' is written in ......"   Being a, ahem, 'responsible Lutheran musician,' I'll be playing Bach = settings (Sebastian and Christoph) of "Mit [Freed] and Freud ich fahr dahin."   And Alan, be it known that for at least a decade, Compline (with 30min = organ recital preceding) has been observed Sunday evenings during term and under Lutheran auspices at = Heinz Chapel, Univ. of Pittsburgh. At one point a 'churchmouse,' who went around the city = 'rating' worship services, called it the "best liturgical show in town." It was founded by John Becker, and = is rather more participatory than Seattle (at least as I witnessed the latter once in the = mid-80s.)   Stan Yoder The Burgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 16:18:02 -0500   At 11:44 AM 1/31/2003 -0800, you wrote: >Dear List: > >I hear a collective groan shuddering through the halls of Cyberland: >"Oh, God, no, not another Pipe Organ List on the Internet! What does >this make, eight thousand or so??" > >Yes, I'm afraid so. I have been thinking about this, and I feel that, >the more the Computer and the Internet become part of our lives, the >more specific and fine-grained will be our self-expression therein. > >I have enjoyed being on PIPORG-L since 1996; and PipeChat since about >1998; and even to have lurked on OrganChat. I am told there are other >lists too. > >Most lists up to now seem to want to fall into either a 'serious' or a >'light' category. I keep wondering if I really fit into either one. >I'm a chatty, gregarious, extroverted, very verbal, highly degreed >organist. At times I feel I don't fit in. When I feel like being >chatty, or academic, I have to watch which list I post to, lest a >certain lady or a certain gentleman take me to task publicly. > >Maybe it's just me, but I'm neither a lightweight nor a 900-lb gorilla, >and oftentimes (like this past week, for example), I've been made to >feel like both. > >Hence, I have embarked on an experiment, and I emphasize it's an >EXPERIMENT. > >I have just created, thanks to Yahoo! Groups, a new, moderated internet >list for *credentialed* organists. The normal minimum qualification >for membership will be a master's degree in music or Associate level >certification with one of the three major English-speaking organ >societies. Membership is at the list owner's discretion, and one's >credentialing is not to be seen either as a guarantee nor an absolute >obstacle to participation. The list is *not* meant for beginners, >hobbyists, or fans of the instrument--there are many other venues where >you can shine. > >I hope you will all take this experiment in the good spirit in which it >was conceived. I think that the experience of high-level postgraduate >training gives its, um, survivors a common language and common pool of >experience that they may enjoy sharing together. The same idea that >informs the famous University Club of New York. I don't like elitism, >and I hope you won't see this list as elitist. But *we* need someplace >to go too, I think. > >At Indiana University, Bloomington, there was a great place for us on >the third floor, the old Associate Instructor's Office amongst the >organ practice rooms. We called it the "AI Lounge", and hung out in it >at all hours....storing our organ shoes, scores, metronomes, and >lunches there...pounding its old wretched piano...and so forth. For a >while, the AI Lounge came under the domination of one or two ugly >personalities, and it was more of a snakepit than a lounge...but I >remember the times when I had some of the best conversations of my life >there, fun *and* sophisticated, scholarly *and* full of laughter. I >remember swapping jokes while playing the left hand parts of the Mahler >5 in full orchestral score (struggling furiously to keep up with the 19 >year old who was sailing thru the top half of the page!!) > >I'm also very glad to reflect that the people who sparkled the >brightest there have gone on to great things! > >So, in the best spirit of the old AI lounge, I am opening, as of today, >The Scholarly Organist Group. If you are an organist with high >professional credentials, visit this website: >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scholorgroup/ and consider this a >personal invitation to join and enjoy yourself. > >You can also access the new list via my website, www.Jonathanbhall.com. > >As List Owner, I do NOT intend for my personality or writings to >dominate the list. I have other venues for that. But I do plan to >participate, and to be myself! > >I should also say that this new list is not intended to disparage or >drain membership from established lists, but to provide a new and, I >hope, creative alternative. > >As I say, this list is an *experiment.* If it fails, it fails, no hard >feelings and no excuses. But I'm hoping it succeeds, and provides >another avenue of conviviality for the seriously sociable, and the >sociably serious. > >With all best wishes to you all, > >Jonathan   Jonathon,   I wish you all the best with this list, but be prepared to talk to = yourself a lot, or listen to yourself. I do think I know what you are after, a = very sober list that seeks to improve knowledge on perfomance matters as well = as the organ as an instrument, on a higher level than the other lists.   I have checked out some of these other lists, and have found extremely little traffic on a lot of them. Most organists and organ enthusiasts = have joined Pip-orgL or Pipe-chat. Some others are on E-org.   The other thing, for most of us working, we can find the time for only so many internet lists to read.   Anyways, I do wish you success.   Cheers,   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:22:01 -0600             May the scholars go their way. God knows we need them. If only they were a bit more tolerable :-) I feel fortunate that I realized early on that I wanted to be a musician first and foremost, thank you. In my dreams, I should like to be on an organ list devoted to people who are truly passionate about organ literature--past, present, future--who know literature, who want to know all there is to know about it if that were only possible, who expand their repertory weekly, and who can't wait to find another worthy piece. There are a few others just about as hooked as = I am, I'm pleased to find; but I'm appalled at the lack of reponse so often to queries involving our literature and regret that there is but a handful of organists on these lists who may enter into a repertory discussion or who help a needy colleague who is searching for a work that is seemingly unavailable.   Case in point: I recently asked 3 lists what they recommended of the work of Robin Milford, whose centenary was January 22. I got two replies from three lists! I called about 10 music dealers, and only Lois Fyfe had something of his. The poor guy languishes in near oblivion, and you'd = think that no one cares.   I'm a composer and am all too well aware of the vicissitudes of the publishing game. More and more these days, if a piece doesn't sell the requisite number of copies that (probably) some bottom-line, = bean-counting, upper-management, tone-deaf jerk comes up with, the piece goes permanently out of print before most people even know of its existence. This is true, of course, of sacred choral literature, CDs, and other relevant music commodities. One lesson to be learned here is that we need to spread the gospel of good publications that houses take a big gamble on producing for our benefit. If we don't support this and gobble up some copies, we'll be down to the top 50, which seems to be all that 95% of American organists can handle these days. But I ramble, so enough said.   Personally, I very much enjoy Jonathan's writing and subject matter, and I'm rather delighted that he offended certain people with whom I've also had trouble. If his new list might include nonscholarly types who share my passion, I'd be happy to join some lively discussion. Otherwise, I'll = skulk and lurk and wait for the day when my kind of list comes along. I should live so long. :-)   Robert Lind      
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing The Scholarly Organist Group x-post From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:22:56 -0600             May the scholars go their way. God knows we need them. If only they were a bit more tolerable :-) I feel fortunate that I realized early on that I wanted to be a musician first and foremost, thank you. In my dreams, I should like to be on an organ list devoted to people who are truly passionate about organ literature--past, present, future--who know literature, who want to know all there is to know about it if that were only possible, who expand their repertory weekly, and who can't wait to find another worthy piece. There are a few others just about as hooked as = I am, I'm pleased to find; but I'm appalled at the lack of reponse so often to queries involving our literature and regret that there is but a handful of organists on these lists who may enter into a repertory discussion or who help a needy colleague who is searching for a work that is seemingly unavailable.   Case in point: I recently asked 3 lists what they recommended of the work of Robin Milford, whose centenary was January 22. I got two replies from three lists! I called about 10 music dealers, and only Lois Fyfe had something of his. The poor guy languishes in near oblivion, and you'd = think that no one cares.   I'm a composer and am all too well aware of the vicissitudes of the publishing game. More and more these days, if a piece doesn't sell the requisite number of copies that (probably) some bottom-line, = bean-counting, upper-management, tone-deaf jerk comes up with, the piece goes permanently out of print before most people even know of its existence. This is true, of course, of sacred choral literature, CDs, and other relevant music commodities. One lesson to be learned here is that we need to spread the gospel of good publications that houses take a big gamble on producing for our benefit. If we don't support this and gobble up some copies, we'll be down to the top 50, which seems to be all that 95% of American organists can handle these days. But I ramble, so enough said.   Personally, I very much enjoy Jonathan's writing and subject matter, and I'm rather delighted that he offended certain people with whom I've also had trouble. If his new list might include nonscholarly types who share my passion, I'd be happy to join some lively discussion. Otherwise, I'll = skulk and lurk and wait for the day when my kind of list comes along. I should live so long. :-)   Robert Lind      
(back) Subject: Todd Wilson Concert From: <FLTim@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 16:26:02 EST     --part1_3b.32c69c61.2b6c43ea_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear List:   If you ever make your way down to Florida, there will be a concert on = Sunday, February 23rd that you won't want to miss.   You can find a list of Todd's credentials and honors at the Karen = McFarlane Artists web-site at: <A = HREF=3D"http://www.concertorganists.com">http://www.concertorganists.com</A= >   The program will be held at: The Cathedral of St. Jude the Apostle 5815 5th Avenue N St. Petersburg, FL call (727) 347-9702 for more concert information and directions. = Information about the Todd Wilson master class being offered is also available. Ask = for the Jason Lorenzon, Cathedral Director of Music.   The organ at St. Jude's is an impressive IV-manual Rodgers/Ruffatti combination instrument. A III-manual Rodgers organ is located in the rear =   gallery   --part1_3b.32c69c61.2b6c43ea_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear List:<BR> <BR> If you ever make your way down to Florida, there will be a concert on = Sunday, February 23rd that you won't want to miss.<BR> <BR> You can find a list of Todd's credentials and honors at the Karen = McFarlane Artists web-site at:<BR> <A = HREF=3D"http://www.concertorganists.com">http://www.concertorganists.com</A= ><BR> <BR> The program will be held at:<BR> The Cathedral of St. Jude the Apostle<BR> 5815 5th Avenue N<BR> St. Petersburg, FL<BR> call (727) 347-9702 for more concert information and directions.&nbsp; = Information about the Todd Wilson master class being offered is also = available.&nbsp; Ask for the Jason Lorenzon, Cathedral Director of = Music.<BR> <BR> The organ at St. Jude's is an impressive IV-manual Rodgers/Ruffatti = combination instrument.&nbsp; A III-manual Rodgers organ is located in the = rear gallery</FONT></HTML>   --part1_3b.32c69c61.2b6c43ea_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Berrien Springs, MI From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 22:39:17 +0100 (CET)   > Also a reminder that Felix Hell is appearing in Berrien > Springs, > Michigan this Sunday (handy to Chicago and Northern > Indiana). Email me > for details if you're interested. > > Carol Scott > Stevensville United Methodist Church   Yes, it will be at Andrews University, Berrien Springs, 4 pm For details contact the organizer, Brian Milnikel, Trinity Lutheran of St. Joseph, MI, per e-mail: bkm_goblue@hotmail.com, or by phone (269 - 428 4776 (h) 269 - 983 5000 (ch)   Hans-Friedrich Hell