PipeChat Digest #3789 - Sunday, July 6, 2003
 
Re: OHS 2003, First Full Day - VERY LONG
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Steve's Church Concert
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Carving a niche in history
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Steve's Church Concert
  by <Shiresvillebone@aol.com>
Re: Steve's Church Concert
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Effective teaching
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Carving a niche in history
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
versets on the psalm-tones or the church modes?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
VERY LONG:  SLC AGO convention, chapter 4
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Thanks, OHS
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Swedish composers
  by "Josiah Armes" <solideogloria87@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: OHS 2003, First Full Day - VERY LONG From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 06:24:15 -0500         > In a message dated 7/5/03 11:44:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > manderusa@EARTHLINK.NET writes: > > >> She has concretized a great deal, > Is this "musique concr=E8te"?    
(back) Subject: Re: Steve's Church Concert From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2003 13:13:08 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   How right John Foss is concerning musical education at a young age!   Much as I hated my schooldays, (all Rugby and Cross Country runs)I still recall the music lessons and the school choir. We were fortunate in having an absolutely excellent (rugby playing) music teacher who actually inspired his classes. Not only that, the school had previously a "virtuoso" choir trainer, and his successor continued to build on that astounding legacy.   Nowadays, "they" pamper to fashion; and "study" anything from rap to heavy-metal, with barely a mention of classical music. I am certainly not anti-pop and I am quite capable of tapping my feet to S-club 7, Michael Jackson and the rest, even though I have now left "head-banging" and playing the "air guitar" behind.   If they want rhythm and excitement, the classical repertoire has that in abundance....Honneger, Prokofiev, Scarlatti....even Bach.   When Carlo Curley says, "Bach was the inventor of Rock & Roll", he isn't far wrong...if only classical music people could communicate such infectious enthusiasm and the sheer panache of the "Sinfonia to Cantata no.29".   Oddly enough, I have always regarded the best music education as that which "involves" people; perhaps even at a physical level. Children love to move to music, and by combining music and dance, or even music and athletic activity, there would be a harvest to reap from the initial seeds.   I used to know a sports teacher who did just this, and he would always conclude his classes, "And if you think gymnastics is difficult, then try ballet!"   Music and movement is so NATURAL.....it just happens, even though there are some who cannot co-ordinate anything, including their clothes.   There is, certainly in the UK, the impression that anything "classical" is not "hip" or doesn't have "street cred", and yet, not even the "break dancers" could come close to the physical prowess and body control of Fred Astaire, let alone a top-class ballet-dancer.   I have always argued that classical music is not an elitist thing, but those who take it up and succeed become an elite, just as great athletes are.   Hopefully, we may yet get rid of politically correct educators and replace them with people who actually KNOW something. Instead of sinking into the mire of "lowest common denominator", we may be able to lift pupils towards excellence and personal success.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Yes Steve - congratulations! Encouraging children to > take part in worthwhile music is absolutely > essential > for the future - if they don't learn decent music > now > what will they teach future generations?   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Carving a niche in history From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2003 17:20:14 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I have a wonderfully colourful book which I obtained in Holland many years ago, more or less devoted to organ cases in Holland but written in the local language.   I have also seen many of the beautiful drawings by Dr A G Hill of organ cases in Europe and especially in the UK, where we have a number of fine specimens.   Locally, there is a Compton Organ with THE most beautiful twin oak case carved by the famous "Mouseman of Kilburn", Robert Thompson, whilst over the next hill lies Halifax Parish Church with its Gilbert-Scott casework. Similarly beautiful twin cases are in evidence at All Soul's, The Pavement, York, executed again by Thompson's of Kilburn.   However, by far the most spectacular carving locally, is that done by a local Halifax Craftsman known as "the owlman"......the whole sanctuary screen, furniture, organ case and lectern carved so perfectly in English Oak.   The small organ I play has a free standing case in oak, with rather nice pipeshades carved by Denys Thurlow personally.   All this made me think about casework generally, and whether, in this day and age, organ builders have in-house carvers or whether they call upon outside artist/craftsmen.   Do any companies employ carvers these days?   If not, who are the best in the field on whom they call when an intricate organ-case is carved?   I am especially thinking of organ cases in recent years which qualify as true works of art, such as St.Iggies, New York, which really demonstrates that outstanding craftsmanship still exists. Indeed, it is a spectacular organ case which befits the exciting Mander instrument within.   In fact, who were the greatest carvers in our respective counties, and where are their finest extant examples of their work?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK                   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Steve's Church Concert From: <Shiresvillebone@aol.com> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2003 13:04:12 EDT     --part1_bc.3ab4552d.2c39b08c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   >.Hopefully, we may yet get rid of politically correct >educators and replace them with people who actually >KNOW something. Instead of sinking into the mire of >"lowest common denominator", we may be able to lift >pupils towards excellence and personal success.   YES! I think that much of what you have said is the essence of my = emerging philosophy of education, as well as my professors ideas. I can not wait = to actually get out there and teaching, so that I can provide a better, = rounder, and more "musically" apt program than I was given throughout my grade = school days!   Regards, JP Meyer   --part1_bc.3ab4552d.2c39b08c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = FACE=3D3D"Geneva" F=3D AMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" SIZE=3D3D"2">&gt;.Hopefully, we may yet get rid of = politic=3D ally correct<BR> &gt;educators and replace them with people who actually<BR> &gt;KNOW something. Instead of sinking into the mire of<BR> &gt;"lowest common denominator", we may be able to lift<BR> &gt;pupils towards excellence and personal success.<BR> <BR> YES!&nbsp; I think that much of what you have said is the essence of my = eme=3D rging philosophy of education, as well as my professors ideas.&nbsp; I = can=3D20=3D not wait to actually get out there and teaching, so that I can provide a = bet=3D ter, rounder, and more "musically" apt program than I was given throughout = m=3D y grade school days!<BR> <BR> Regards,<BR> JP Meyer</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" FACE=3D3D"Geneva" = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"=3D20=3D SIZE=3D3D"2"></FONT></HTML>   --part1_bc.3ab4552d.2c39b08c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Steve's Church Concert From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2003 13:12:29 EDT     --part1_ca.1f0dcd1d.2c39b27d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Shiresvillebone@aol.com writes: > I can not wait to actually get out there and teaching, so that I can > provide a better, rounder, and more "musically" apt program than I was = given > throughout my grade school days!   Ah, the idealist. Nothing wrong with that, but when you "get out there," = the idealism will head straight into what's out there...whether that be = labelled mediocrity or practicality or survival.   Gee, I'm sounding ever so cynical. Oh well.   Neil Brown   --part1_ca.1f0dcd1d.2c39b27d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D3 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Shiresvillebone@aol.com writes: </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D =3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERI=3D F" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I can not wait to actually = get=3D20=3D out there and teaching, so that I can provide a better, rounder, and more = "m=3D usically" apt program than I was given throughout my grade school = days!</FON=3D T><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D3 FAMI=3D LY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"arial" LANG=3D3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Ah, the idealist. Nothing wrong with that, but when you "get out there," = the=3D idealism will head straight into what's out there...whether that be = labelle=3D d mediocrity or practicality or survival.<BR> <BR> Gee, I'm sounding ever so cynical.&nbsp; Oh well.<BR> <BR> Neil Brown</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ca.1f0dcd1d.2c39b27d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Effective teaching From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 14:37:17 -0400   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_16343172= =3D=3D.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   At 01:12 PM 7/6/03 -0400, you wrote:   >Shiresvillebone@aol.com writes: >>I can not wait to actually get out there and teaching, so that I can >>provide a better, rounder, and more "musically" apt program than I was >>given throughout my grade school days! > > >Ah, the idealist. Nothing wrong with that, but when you "get out there," >the idealism will head straight into what's out there...whether that be >labelled mediocrity or practicality or survival. > >Gee, I'm sounding ever so cynical. Oh well. > >Neil Brown     Neil,   Yes you are!, And in my opinion un-necessarily so. After some 45 years = of teaching, I found it was far better to do it my way than to simply follow the crowd. Albeit I did not teach music, other than as a sideline, or hobby, for I was a Mechanical Engineer, - but one of my finest Choirmasters, a Dr. Eric Brown, who conducted the Imperial College Choir was a teacher of Civil Engineering at Imperial College.   I always felt that if he could do it, so could I!   Stick with it Shiresvillebone   In my day, it was "publish or be damned", but I published very little and = I was never damned! I found myself as a teacher, and was only interested in =   teaching, as Frank Sinatra sang, "I did it my way".   Good luck to Shiresvillebone for the up beat attitude, and don't let the cynics get at you, you can do it your way!   Best wishes,   Bob Conway       --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_16343172= =3D=3D.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> <body> At 01:12 PM 7/6/03 -0400, you wrote:<br><br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite>Shiresvillebone@aol.com writes: <font size=3D2><br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite>I can not wait to actually get = out there and teaching, so that I can provide a better, rounder, and more &quot;musically&quot; apt program than I was given throughout my grade school days!</font></blockquote><font face=3D"arial"><br><br> Ah, the idealist. Nothing wrong with that, but when you &quot;get out there,&quot; the idealism will head straight into what's out there...whether that be labelled mediocrity or practicality or survival.<br><br> Gee, I'm sounding ever so cynical.&nbsp; Oh well.<br><br> Neil Brown </font></blockquote><br><br> Neil,<br><br> Yes you are!,&nbsp; And in my opinion un-necessarily so.&nbsp; After some 45 years of teaching, I found it was far better to do it my way than to simply follow the crowd.&nbsp; Albeit I did not teach music, other than as a sideline, or hobby, for I was a Mechanical Engineer, - but one of my finest Choirmasters, a Dr. Eric Brown, who conducted the Imperial College Choir was a teacher of Civil Engineering at Imperial College.<br><br> I always felt that if he could do it, so could I!<br><br> Stick with it Shiresvillebone<br><br> In my day, it was &quot;publish or be damned&quot;, but I published very little and I was never damned!&nbsp; I found myself as a teacher, and was only interested in teaching, as Frank Sinatra sang, &quot;I did it my way&quot;.<br><br> Good luck to Shiresvillebone for the up beat attitude, and don't let the cynics get at you, you can do it your way!<br><br> Best wishes,<br><br> Bob Conway<br><br> </body> <br> </html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_16343172= =3D=3D.ALT--    
(back) Subject: Re: Carving a niche in history From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 15:10:39 -0400   On 7/6/03 12:20 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Do any companies employ carvers these days? > > If not, who are the best in the field on whom they > call when an intricate organ-case is carved? > Colin, I'll mention this because, though I don't know the answer, I'm sure someone will, and it may motivate someone to expand on my ignorance.   One of the hottest builders in America today is Paul Fritts, of Tacoma, Wash.; one of the most touted of his instruments is at Pacific Lutheran Univrsity, Tacoma. What I cannot recall is the name of the casework = artist, but I vaguely recall that it was his wife, or his sister, or something = like that.   I've never seen the instrument, though I have seen pictures--which I = suppose doesn't really show much. But if someone can fill in the details. . . .   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2003 00:59:58 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Leading on from this ambiguity is a further mystery surrounded by an enigma.   The classical thinking in music history goes something like:-   a) Bach came into contact with the North German tradition in the North.   b) Bach knew the Italian works from the South   c) Bach studied scores of French music   d) Bach put them altogether   All very simple, just as historians like it.   I forget how to spell the name, but Keil (Kiel?) had a well established university with a very important library, and the Hanseatic Port towns such as Luneberg, attracted many travellers; not least for the music and the performance opportunities.   There is the suggestion that Bach, by spending so much time in the area, came into contact with Italian music and musicians in the far North in the first instance.   One might consider the extraordinary violin techniques transcribed to the organ by Bruhns, and which are such a powerful and almost unique feature of the great E Minor Prelude and Fugue. In performing this work, if we think "Strings", we have a fair chance of pulling the work off properly....then consider the sophistication of the writing. This is far removed from the usual style of the period in this area, and suggests Italian string influences.   Just my two farthings worth....which must be about half a cent these days.   Incidentally, the borders of Schleswig-Holstein were forever wandering around, and I suspect that no-one really bothered whether they were Danish or German. It only affects programme notes....whether to call him Diederich or Dietrich.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote: > On 7/3/03 9:49 PM, "Josiah Armes" > <solideogloria87@earthlink.net> wrote: > > > Yes, Buxtehude was Danish. But his music is > really quite German. > > > > SDG, > > Josiah > > Josiah: About two weeks ago there was major talk > about Buxtehude's > nationality. On this list or on OrganChat. I > remember only a little: The > date and place (even country) of his birth are > unknown; his father was from > what we now call Sweden--but borders change. > Denmark at one point owned a > lot of south(western) Sweden. The family roots are > in the Duchy of > Holstein, which is sometimes German, sometimes > Danish. Conclusion, as I > recall: No definitive statement can be made   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: versets on the psalm-tones or the church modes? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 18:30:52 -0700   Does anyone know of collections of SHORT versets based either on the psalm-tones and/or the church modes? My chanter is complaining of the long Psalms during communion, and I'd like to break them up, but with something better than just my noodling around in Mode iv (grin). I have seen things like this over the years; I think I even owned some at one point; but they're long-gone and I can't remember what they were, or who wrote them.   THANKS!   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: VERY LONG: SLC AGO convention, chapter 4 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:38:41 -0500   AN AMATEUR'S ORGAN PILGRIMAGE TO GOD'S COUNTRY   Chapter 4 - Wednesday, June 18   We assembled at the LDS Assembly Hall at Temple Square to again hear the competition winners. The Mormon pioneers had much shorter femurs than most of us convention attendees - I wanted an extra joint added to my thighs just to sit comfortably in the pews without destroying what was left of my knees.   WARNING: I am about to gush shamelessly. Chelsea Chen led the recital, with the Concerto in D minor after Vivaldi, BWV 596, and the Fugue in G major ("Jig"), BWV 577. Is "stunning" too strong a term to use here? I hope not. Her extensive piano training shone through in all the repeated notes and the tempo control - nothing old school here. She obviously enjoyed playing as evidenced by her body language. She is mature for 19 yoa, with a handle on technique, timing, registration, emotive qualities. Everyone gasped at the joyous romp also known as the Jig, perfectly executed with exceptional control. I think she will go far.   Next Aleksandr Kirillov played the Wondrous Love variations by Samuel Barber (a required piece for the competition); 2 Bach chorale preludes: Herr Gott, nun sei gepreiset, BWV 601, and Wer nur den lieben Gott lasst walten, BWV 642; and the Prelude and Fugue in A minor, BWV 543. He did a fine job throughout in a more reserved fashion than Chelsea; the "Herr Gott" seemed a bit wobbly. The "Wer nur" was strong, but he ended on a C# rather than an E in the middle voice. The A minor was superb, particularly the prelude, held to a moderate pace with only a subtle difference (but just enough) between the slurred and nonslurred (or is it unslurred?) measures.   We left for our respective workshops - I attended Joyce Jones' workshop on organ pedagogy. A Rodgers 3-manual Trillium was set up in the LDS Conference Center Theatre. She has produced a method book for pianists pressed into organ playing at church, and furthermore recommended the Roger David method book. When she asked for questions prior to the session, I wanted to ask her about performance anxiety, but someone in front of me asked instead about her recital dress the night before, and for ten minutes we were regaled over the provenance of that outfit. She is quite a character, but to see her feet, shod in gold shoes (another long explanation was provided regarding new shoes vs. stretched shoes and panty hose vs. not, etc.), in action is to behold a thing of beauty.   The noon recital at the Tabernacle was given by Heidi Alley. I sat about eight rows from the front center this time. Her program:   Concert Piece - Peeters Cantabile - Jongen Come, come, ye saints An old melody: Prelude on Waly Waly - Joyce Jones Prelude and Fugue on the Name of Alain - Durufle   This was the best tabernacle performance yet. The Concert Piece is actually the cadenza from Peeter's organ concerto, and is a lovely piece of freight train music. If ever I have the ambition and resources, I will learn this one. The Jongen was absolutely gorgeous; I'm surprised that I haven't heard it in recital before that I can recall. And she nailed the Durufle - I won't forget that for a long time.   Floating out of the Tabernacle, we met Ken Sybesma, David Krohne, and Pat Maimone for lunch, again at the Garden Restaurant. Although the food was fabulous, we did not have time to order a dessert before it was on to hear Richard Elliott at the Conference Center.   His program:   Mars, from The Planets - Holst Norwegian Rustic March - Grieg Come, come, ye saints An old melody: Be thou my vision - Elliott Variations on a Noel - Dupre   I must note several "bests" occurred here - it was the best yet performance at the Conference Center and the best rendition of "Come, come, ye saints" and of an old melody. Playing everything from memory, he made the room ring, and played impeccably, exhibiting the talent and experience he honed at the Wanamaker. The Dupre certainly produced no complaints - good registration. I was disappointed not to get my hands on a recording by him (I have found one in the OHS catalogue, and it will soon be mine, we hope).   After reviewing the outline for my workshop on the history of jazz (it looked way too basic even for me), I opted instead for the new music workshop.   Before proceeding further in my travelogue, I must tell you that one meets all kinds at a conference such as this. I was particularly irritated by two old farts complaining about the bus driver all the way to UofU. Even in Utah the convention centers need vending machines dispensing Prozac gum to such. During this workshop while a piece written by an African-American was showcased and I was writing down the title to look for it later, some woman behind me spouted off to her neighbor in the nastiest of tones that she didn't know why THAT piece was chosen - who would like that? There were people there that I was sure did not own a piece of Durufle or Dupre. However, I met some of the nicest organists and organ enthusiasts ever, from cardiologists, to list lurkers, to MoTab choir members, to cathedral organists, to the everyday Mormon, on a one-to-one basis. Before arriving I had vaguely hoped to pair off with some list members or other organists who would actually help educate me as to items such as registration as I witnessed the events. I am always eager to learn more and open to others' views. That did not occur, but the people with whom I was able to converse were just the tops.   An interesting and refreshing event occurred next in the program: we were treated to a concert of art songs by French romantic organists, performed by James Welch (organ and piano), Robin Hancock (piano) and Kathryn Hunter (soprano). Program:   L'Abeille (Elle Cabrol) - Widor: Aimons toujours (Victor Hugo) N'avez-vous point su les comprendre (S. de Beauregard) A toi (Victor Hugo) Ave Maria Allegro vivace (No. 4 from Six duos pour piano et harmonium) - Widor Chanson de Berger (Henry Gauthier-Villars) - Pierne: Provence (Ed. Guinand) La Brise (H. Passerieu) Scherzo (No. 5 from Six duos pour harmonium et piano, op. 8) - Saint-Saens Vogue, vogue la Galere (Bacarolle) (Jean Aicard) - Saint-Saens Ame Triste (Georges Docquois) - Saint Saens Final alla Schumann sur un noel languedocien, op. 83 - Guilmant Les Angelus, op. 57 (Jehan la Povre Moyne) - Vierne: Au matin, A midi, Au soir   I wonder if anyone has ever tried to transcribe the Ave Maria for organ - it was divine. The music was ravishingly done in a lavish ballroom now used for weekly services. The organ was a 1993 Casavant of 2 manuals, 45 ranks (no kidding), of electro-pneumatic action.   We again dined at the Garden Restaurant - Cynthia was hell-bound to indulge in dessert one more time there. If only the Mormons served coffee with it!   That evening found us again at the Tabernacle, this time with Thomas Murray presiding. He played:   Fugue in G minor, K. 401, with introduction - Mozart Six Canonic Studies - Schumann (3 before Elgar, 3 after) Severn Suite, op. 87 - Elgar Sonata Eroica, op. 94 - Jongen   The Mozart was unfinished, the introduction provided by George Thalban-Ball, and the conclusion by Maximilian Stadler (sp?), who also completed the Requiem. Dr. Murray posited that the reason much of Mozart's organ music has not surfaced was because (1) much of his work was improvisation, and (2) some organ work was found in generic piano or piano 4-hand collections (this was a piece that I have done on organ with another, out of a four-hands Mozart collection).   Murray chose distinctive registrations from opposite sides of the organ chambers for the voices in the Canonic Studies. He also transcribed the Severn Suite himself and played it picture perfect. He plays so well, but I don't generally enjoy his choice of programs. He did use scores, so got more notes right than Jones or Weaver.   He inserted a short piece that I've heard before, but couldn't recall - is there someone named Duvalet that wrote lyrical freight train music? My favorite of the evening was the Jongen - he stole my heart with that one. The glissando down the manual and finishing on the pedal was memorable - the very best Tom Murray I've heard ever! His encore was the simple Sicilienne by Paradies, sweetly played.   You know (those words generally preface one of my ramblings down my rapids of semiconsciousness, as opposed to "stream of consciousness"), the pedagogic field is a tough one, particularly when one teaches at the top of his/her field at a prestigious school. There is little room for maintaining the fire and ice in personal performance, because one has to always be a model for students, would-be students, and students' students, and to exemplify one's own gleanings at the hands of the teachers from whom one is trying to pass on the pedagogic "lineage" that is so important, particularly nowadays. Furthermore, one always has to be constantly publishing, discovering and performing obscure material, and/or transcribing orchestral music for organ, while keeping his/her own performance practice at recital level. Then there is the constant pressure for good students, ones who are tested and may be allowed to drink from the holy grail and learn the secrets of the masters, so that their and their succeeding generations are immortalized in the style of the performer. A good teacher must walk a fine line between insisting on the "right"/"my" way in reining in the wayward and stubborn pupil, and allowing a student to become more than a picture postcard cloned soundbite of the teacher (that used to be my complaint about Eastman grads - they all seemed to sound just alike). It is hard to succeed in this field, and we must and should admire those who do. And the Jongen showed us there was still excitement left in Murray's playing.   Don't worry - I'll probably talk about students tomorrow. Besides, it is the last day.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Thanks, OHS From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:45:27 -0500   I am always thrilled when the OHS Annual Convention Handbook comes out - while not as good as being there, it is so interesting and full of information about the performers, program, organ and building. I think this year's handbook beats them all! Thanks, OHS.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Swedish composers From: "Josiah Armes" <solideogloria87@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 21:56:06 -0400   The list has been very helpful to me. I am also considering getting some Swedish sheet music.   What are some good Baroque composers from Sweden or Denmark?   SDG, Josiah