PipeChat Digest #3793 - Wednesday, July 9, 2003
 
Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE)
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
20th Century Bach
  by "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com>
Stop?
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Re: 20th Century Bach
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Stop?
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Organ Symphonies/Suites
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE)
  by "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net>
Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE)
  by "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com>
Thanks
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Electronic parts availability
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Neo Baroque
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: Thanks
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE) From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 07:39:54 EDT     --part1_12b.2d87ce2d.2c3c078a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Ah! A point, I think about the hooky pooky, p&w, easy Jesus music and our beloved pipe organs.   IT IS THE ULTIMATE pad instrument--no looping of samples and an endless supply of STEADY wind unlike the hot air from the pulpit.   We can make 7-11 choruses into fabulous offertories, making a medley with = a HYMN of value.   Just as we used to expect our Rectal instrument at our Conservatory to = play it all,(i understand this is not PC, but it was true at one time) our = organ whether Digital or Wind blown can do it and do it well....we have to = decide we whether we want to BOTHER with the stuff they are serving up.   dale in Florida     --part1_12b.2d87ce2d.2c3c078a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0">Ah! A point, I think about the hooky pooky, = p&amp;w,=3D easy Jesus music and our beloved pipe organs.<BR> <BR> IT IS THE ULTIMATE pad instrument--no looping of samples and an endless = supp=3D ly of STEADY wind unlike the hot air from the pulpit.<BR> <BR> We can make 7-11 choruses into fabulous offertories, making a medley with = a=3D20=3D HYMN of value.<BR> <BR> Just as we used to expect our Rectal instrument at our Conservatory to = play=3D20=3D it all,(i understand this is not PC, but it was true at one time) our = organ=3D20=3D whether Digital or Wind blown can do it and do it well....we have to = decide=3D20=3D we whether we want to BOTHER with the stuff they are serving up.<BR> <BR> dale in Florida<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_12b.2d87ce2d.2c3c078a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: 20th Century Bach From: "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 14:57:02 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C34561.30A6FC20 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Dear Listers,   I was up late last night flicking through the channels on the TV, when I = =3D caught the very last minute of a programme on BBC 2. The final minute =3D was of a man playing what looked to be a fabulous organ, and sounded =3D equally beautiful. Having flicked through the TV pages, I discovered =3D that the programme in question was called '20th Century Bach'. Did =3D anybody (probably only in the UK) see this programme, and if so can you = =3D tell me anything about the organ that was being played, and by whom??   Thanks   Paul. ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C34561.30A6FC20 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1106" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Dear Listers,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I was up late last night flicking =3D through the=3D20 channels on the TV, when I caught the very last minute of a programme on = =3D BBC=3D20 2.&nbsp; The final minute was of a man playing what looked to be a =3D fabulous=3D20 organ, and sounded equally beautiful.&nbsp; Having flicked through the =3D TV pages,=3D20 I&nbsp;discovered that the programme in question was called '20th =3D Century=3D20 Bach'.&nbsp; Did anybody (probably only in the UK) see this programme, =3D and if so=3D20 can you tell me anything about the organ that was being played, and = by=3D20 whom??</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Thanks</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Paul.</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C34561.30A6FC20--    
(back) Subject: Stop? From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 10:30:41 -0400   At the Region One AGO convention, we heard the magnificent Nelson Barden amalgamation of several Skinners into one instrument, located at the Church of the Transfiguration in the Community of Jesus in Orleans, MA. Two of the stops are called "Flat Front Cello" (one of them is the celeste of the other). Anybody have an opinion of why Skinner would have called it "flat front" (other than the obvious reason), and does anyone know of another organ with that stop?   David Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: 20th Century Bach From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 15:33:58 +0100   Paul,   This series was announced on this list - several posts lasr week qv- it = was on every night last week and every night this week too - at midnight or thereabouts on BBC2. This week is mostly on the Arnstadt Bach organ - programme details in the Radio Times. Last night was from St. Wenzel's chuch, Naumberg, Germany.   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2003 2:57 PM Subject: 20th Century Bach     Dear Listers,   I was up late last night flicking through the channels on the TV, when I caught the very last minute of a programme on BBC 2. The final minute was of a man playing what looked to be a fabulous organ, and sounded equally beautiful. Having flicked through the TV pages, I discovered that the programme in question was called '20th Century Bach'. Did anybody = (probably only in the UK) see this programme, and if so can you tell me anything = about the organ that was being played, and by whom??   Thanks   Paul.    
(back) Subject: Re: Stop? From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2003 12:28:09 -0500   I also noticed that designation for those two stops. I'm guessing (possibly wrongly) that the name refers to the shape of the pipes themselves -- that they are basically "D" shaped in cross section, rather than the normal (cylindrical) "O", with their mouths located on the flat side.   I have not seen the organ or pipes in question here, nor any others = fitting what I've described above in other Skinner organs (though they may = exist?), but I have seen pipes constructed in this way in the Atlantic City Convention Hall Midmer-Losh organ.   I'm not certain what the benefit of building the pipes this way would be, other than to have yet one more variation of a wide-mouthed string...any voicers on the List have an idea?? I *am* certain that they are interesting pipes to *see*...!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR     At 10:30 AM 7/8/2003 -0400, David Baker wrote: >At the Region One AGO convention, we heard the magnificent Nelson Barden >amalgamation of several Skinners into one instrument, located at the >Church of the Transfiguration in the Community of Jesus in Orleans, >MA. Two of the stops are called "Flat Front Cello" (one of them is the >celeste of the other). Anybody have an opinion of why Skinner would have =   >called it "flat front" (other than the obvious reason), and does anyone >know of another organ with that stop?      
(back) Subject: Organ Symphonies/Suites From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 12:31:14 -0500           My 2 cents:   I think composers, since the days of Haydn, know when they have written a symphony in a classical or more modern sense. Franck wrote a symphony for orchestra, and he wrote a Grand Piece Symphonique for organ. Messiaen = wrote an orchestral symphony "Turangalila". If he had wanted to write a symphony for organ, I'm sure he could and would have. For someone to come along and second-guess a piece of his sacred music for organ and give it a = "symphony" appellation is totally wrong-headed IMHO. Taken to its absurdity, I have had at least one organ suite published (an out-of-print Pentecost Suite from Augsburg comes to mind), and it is definitely that: Three pieces = based on German Pentecost chorales, loud-soft-loud, with no conscious interconnection of musical ideas among them, just a common liturgical theme.   There is a psychological weight attached to writing a symphony. It should be up to one's very highest standards, and many composers are mighty fearful to attempt the medium. Read, e.g., about Brahms and why it took = him so long to get around to writing his first symphony. Concerning Widor: = It's all very well and good for musicologists to decide that his symphonies = are, in reality, suites. I've never been sufficiently enthusiastic about them = to analyze, look for elements of sonata-allegro form, etc., to see if they "qualify" from some stuffy, pedantic point of view. If he labelled them as symphonies, I'd let it go at that. I understand the reticence, however. = One need only look at the sonatas of Merkel, let's say, in which one gets a much more schoolbookish approach to sonata form in all movements--particularly the outer ones.   Bob Lind    
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE) From: "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:37:23 -0400   Bruce Cornely and the Baskerbeagles in the Muttastery of HowlingAcres: http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 Click to help some animals: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=3D308025421         ---------- Original Message ---------------------------------- From: RonSeverin@aol.com   <I think you just run over yourself a bit.>   .... and how did I do that?     <An organ does need soft, mp, mf and big stops. The stop list needs to make sense for most things, and if designed right can play most music styles well. Special care must be taken with mixtures, mutations, reeds, etc.>   But the size of the instrument and building need to be considered in that stoplist. Not all organs NEED mixtures, mutations and reeds. First and foremost, I consider an organ to be "principals;" thus, the first concern should be the principal chorus. Then flutes, then strings, and if the organ large enough, reeds, mutations and LAST for the complete small organ, mixtures. At OHS we heard so many beautiful, full bodied choruses in small instruments without mixtures. They just are not necessary in small rooms. In the hymn-sing I played for on a 2/22 Hook & Hastings, support for the congregation could be almost doubled by simply adding the Great Open Diapason which, in the scheme of things is a First Open Diapason. The Second Open Diapason is in the Swell department and quite proudly supports hearty singing. Any day, give me another Open Diapason over a mixture.     < I've seen some real messes that sort of look good on paper. I'll bet you've played some of them, as I have. I make a rule, no party horn until everything else is there to support it.>   The same should apply to mixtures, as well.   <I tend to go toward the French side of things. It doesn't have to be north german to be good.>   True. But you certainly don't want that nice French sound to be compromised by the presence of a Dutch Krummhorn, just so the organ can be "eclectic" no do you?   ________________________________________________________________ This email has been scanned for viruses.      
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 17:53:43 EDT     --part1_18c.1d0b56aa.2c3c9767_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Bruce:   I can see you're in a mood. Cromorne is the only way to go. Now the type of organ I like is very similar to your 19th Century Gems. Lower pitched mixtures, fewer breaks. It seems a lot of today's organists are headed in that direction. I predict a lot more organs are going to be ordered in some form of well temper for church work. We have just come through the driest period of organ building, the neo-baroque. The sounds for the most part were quite unpleasant. People will come back to hear the organ again, when the dust completely settles, and it will.   In considering reeds, the very first one in an organ should be the Oboe, the second a trumpet, the third a Cromorne.   Strings: the first to consider is a broad scale Salicional in the Swell and a Voix Celeste and a 4' companion if possible.   Colorful Flutes 8' and 4' and on the great Flute Harmonique and a Bourdon of lead, followed with a good blending Montre and Viola da Gamba build the chorus from there. You are right about the mixture, put it into the swell, a real firey one to go with the reeds coupled. A Quint and a Quarte de Nasard or fifteenth would be enough on a small spec.   Every Swell should have a Diapason 8' of some sort and the mutations if they are placed in the organ. A fourth reed, you guessed it a Vox Humana   All this could be squeezed into a 22 stop two manual organ, of great use and flexability. Two or three augmented pedal ranks and you've got something. Open wood, a Bourdon and a stringy wide scaled principal 8'. 16' reed 12 notes from the manual trumpet.   I'm still using Jack Bethards outstanding organ spec. for Mother of Good Council RC in LA of eleven stops expanded. It's an excellent model to borrow from. It only has one duplexed stop the Trumpet. With outstanding acoustics It still makes a glorious noise. It was built in the later 80's. Jack's concept was a master stroke of genius.   Ron   --part1_18c.1d0b56aa.2c3c9767_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Bruce:<BR> <BR> I can see you're in a mood. Cromorne is the only way to go.<BR> Now the type of organ I like is very similar to your 19th Century<BR> Gems. Lower pitched mixtures, fewer breaks. It seems a lot of<BR> today's organists are headed in that direction. I predict a lot<BR> more organs are going to be ordered in some form of well<BR> temper for church work. We have just come through the driest<BR> period of organ building, the neo-baroque. The sounds for the<BR> most part were quite unpleasant. People will come back to hear<BR> the organ again, when the dust completely settles, and it will.<BR> <BR> In considering reeds, the very first one in an organ should be the<BR> Oboe, the second a trumpet, the third a Cromorne.<BR> <BR> Strings: the first to consider is a broad scale Salicional in the <BR> Swell and a Voix Celeste and a 4' companion if possible.<BR> <BR> Colorful Flutes 8' and 4' and on the great Flute Harmonique and <BR> a Bourdon of lead, followed with a good blending Montre and<BR> Viola da Gamba build the chorus from there. You are right<BR> about the mixture, put it into the swell, a real firey one to go with<BR> the reeds coupled. A Quint and a Quarte de Nasard or fifteenth<BR> would be enough on a small spec.<BR> <BR> Every Swell should have a Diapason 8' of some sort and the <BR> mutations if they are placed in the organ. A fourth reed, you<BR> guessed it a Vox Humana<BR> <BR> All this could be squeezed into a 22 stop two manual organ,<BR> of great use and flexability. Two or three augmented pedal<BR> ranks and you've got something. Open wood, a Bourdon<BR> and a stringy wide scaled principal 8'. 16' reed 12 notes<BR> from the manual trumpet.<BR> <BR> I'm still using Jack Bethards outstanding organ spec. for <BR> Mother of Good Council RC in LA of eleven stops expanded.<BR> It's an excellent model to borrow from. It only has one<BR> duplexed stop the Trumpet. With outstanding acoustics<BR> It still makes a glorious noise. It was built in the later 80's.<BR> Jack's concept was a master stroke of genius.<BR> <BR> Ron</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18c.1d0b56aa.2c3c9767_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE) From: "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 18:13:02 -0700 (PDT)   --0-1628271100-1057713182=3D:70597 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii   Bruce,(and chatters) I am sure you enjoy the 3/44 organ. For 15 years I played a 2 manual = Allen, but I felt my services to God were the best I could do. I would = have loved to have had a pipe organ, but it wasn't to be. Hopefully, I = will get to sub on some pipe organs in the Denton, Dallas, Ft. Worth area = as soon as my health improves. Keith is down with a cold today, so the = only thing working is this computer, which only works half the time. = Please pray that my health will improve in the near future. It is very = hard to start a marriage being ill, and with all the work in setting up = the house. Speaking of Baldwin, Keith has a wonderful 6' Baldwin grand = piano, however it is covered with boxes and not accessible. I have a = recital scheduled in Sept. and even the organ is not set up. Hopefully = the little church down the street, which has an organ, will give me = practicing privileges. Thanks all of you for your support. And-- I = actually spoke to the great BRUCE of Howling Acres this morning. It was good to hear your voice, Bruce. It reminded me of a tuning Keith did last = week when they had a Beagle who "sang" the entire time Keith was tuning. = (He is teaching me to tune, so takes me on jobs). I think we plan a trip = to Florida sometime this year to see my niece and nephew and their new = son, and may pass by Gainsville. Lee   Bruce Cornely <cremona@cervo.net> wrote: From: RonSeverin@aol.com -- All this needs to be taken into consideration, as well as congregational needs, and future organists.   I really wonder about taking in the desires of "future organists". I've yet to play an instrument that I felt the previous organists/instrument planners gave a hoot about my desires. IF they had there would be smallish, unequal temperament organs all over the place without pistons or adjustable benches!! ;-)   The main thing to be considered is the integrity of the instrument and if it can do ITS job well and does it properly represent the work of its builder. If a church does alot of CCM/contemporary praze dittioids, then this needn't be reflected in the design of the organ, but rather in the design of the choir loft, with adequate space left for multiple audio and power outlets. An organ should certainly not be expected to do EVERYTHING, much less EVERYTHING WELL.   I really enjoy the 3/44 Casavant in the Baptist church I serve. It is designed with integrity for the most part, and it's only failings are the gross compromises, which (bless 'em) Casavant did so well they are indispensible. The most outstanding of these is the Gemshorn and Celeste in the Swell which replace a string/celeste. The Gemshorn/Celeste are almost a "whisper" stop, but I wouldn't trade them for anything. I just use the organ to do what it does best. It's wonderful.   The most important aspect of organ building/planning is usually the most neglected. That is INTEGRITY OF DESIGN.... at least IMNSHO! ;-)     Bruce Cornely and the Baskerbeagles in the Muttastery of HowlingAcres: http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 Click to help some animals: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=3D308025421           ________________________________________________________________ This email has been scanned for viruses.         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo. --0-1628271100-1057713182=3D:70597 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <DIV>Bruce,(and chatters)</DIV> <DIV>I am sure you enjoy the 3/44 organ.&nbsp; For 15 years I played a 2 = manual Allen, but I felt my services to God were the best I could = do.&nbsp; I would have loved to have had a pipe organ, but it wasn't to be.&nbsp; Hopefully, I will get to sub on some pipe organs in the Denton, = Dallas, Ft. Worth area as soon as my health improves.&nbsp; Keith is down = with a cold today, so the only thing working is this computer, which only = works half the time.&nbsp; Please pray that my health will improve in the = near future.&nbsp; It is very hard to start a marriage being ill, and with = all the work in setting up the house.&nbsp; Speaking of Baldwin, Keith has = a wonderful 6' Baldwin grand piano, however it is covered with boxes and = not accessible.&nbsp; I have a recital scheduled in Sept. and even the = organ is not set up.&nbsp; Hopefully the little church down the street, = which has an organ, will give me practicing privileges.&nbsp; Thanks all = of you for your support.&nbsp; And-- I actually spoke to the great BRUCE of Howling Acres&nbsp;this morning.&nbsp; It was = good to hear your voice, Bruce.&nbsp;It reminded me of a tuning Keith did = last week when they had a Beagle who "sang" the entire time Keith was = tuning.&nbsp; (He is teaching me to tune, so takes me on jobs).&nbsp;I = think we plan a trip to Florida sometime this year to see my niece and = nephew and their new son, and may pass by Gainsville.&nbsp; Lee</DIV> <DIV><BR><B><I>Bruce Cornely &lt;cremona@cervo.net&gt;</I></B> = wrote:</DIV> <DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: = #1010ff 2px solid; WIDTH: 100%">From: RonSeverin@aol.com<BR><WHAT = ---snip-<br organ? pipe your build to rightbuilder the is who or>-- All = this needs to be taken into consideration, as well as <BR>congregational = needs, and future organists. <BR><BR>I really wonder about taking in the = desires of "future <BR>organists". I've yet to play an instrument that I = felt the <BR>previous organists/instrument planners gave a hoot about my = <BR>desires. IF they had there would be smallish, unequal <BR>temperament = organs all over the place without pistons or <BR>adjustable benches!! ;-) = <BR><BR>The main thing to be considered is the integrity of the instrument = <BR>and if it can do ITS job well and does it properly represent the = <BR>work of its builder. If a church does alot of CCM/contemporary = <BR>praze dittioids, then this needn't be reflected in the design of = <BR>the organ, but rather in the design of the choir loft, with <BR>adequate space left for multiple audio and power outlets. An = <BR>organ should certainly not be expected to do EVERYTHING, much less = <BR>EVERYTHING WELL.<BR><BR>I really enjoy the 3/44 Casavant in the = Baptist church I serve. <BR>It is designed with integrity for the most = part, and it's only <BR>failings are the gross compromises, which (bless = 'em) Casavant did <BR>so well they are indispensible. The most outstanding = of these is <BR>the Gemshorn and Celeste in the Swell which replace a = <BR>string/celeste. The Gemshorn/Celeste are almost a "whisper" <BR>stop, = but I wouldn't trade them for anything. I just use the <BR>organ to do = what it does best. It's wonderful.<BR><BR>The most important aspect of = organ building/planning is usually <BR>the most neglected. That is = INTEGRITY OF DESIGN.... at least <BR>IMNSHO! ;-)<BR><BR><BR>Bruce Cornely = and the Baskerbeagles<BR>in the Muttastery of HowlingAcres: = <BR>http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502<BR>Click to help some animals: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and = <BR>http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=3D308025421<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>____= ____________________________________________________________<BR>This email = has been scanned for viruses.<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>"Pipe Up and Be = Heard!"<BR>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs &amp; = related topics<BR>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org<BR>List: = mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org<BR>Administration: = mailto:admin@pipechat.org<BR>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: = mailto:requests@pipechat.org<BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><p><hr SIZE=3D1> Do you Yahoo!?<br> <a = href=3D"http://us.rd.yahoo.com/search/mailsig/*http://search.yahoo.com">The= New Yahoo! Search</a> - Faster. Easier. Bingo. --0-1628271100-1057713182=3D:70597--  
(back) Subject: Thanks From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2003 20:23:30 -0500   I know this sounds quite maudlin, like I've drunk too much, but I swear I've not had a drop. But the last two days have been spent in all-day court with no break for bathroom or lunch, reports past due that were legally insufficient but no one seemed to care but me, having to prep a witness to be just a tad less than awful in court on Thursday, being the only one in the office consigned to be the bad cop all the time, waking up at 3:00 this morning with my throat closing up from an allergic reaction from mowing grass the last two days, finding out that one of my friends was fired from her state job today, and wondering just what the hell was I accomplishing for anyone.   Yet I was brushing my teeth this morning, groggy from the Benadryl that reversed the reaction, and I was driving home this afternoon without fighting rain, and I was sitting on the couch stroking the little kitten that came into my life a couple weeks ago, and I was feeding the cats and thinking about how good life can be and is. And I realized that I appreciate people like you who let me write, answer my questions, and are just nice to me. All the little joys of appreciating the moment, the kindness of strangers, and gladness for what we've experienced in life thus far should never be taken for granted.   So even if it's not Thanksgiving, thanks to all of you.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   "Once more into the fray" - tomorrow.        
(back) Subject: Electronic parts availability From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 21:31:30 EDT   As long as The Almighty keeps making sheep, horses, and trees, real = pipe organs will have replacement parts. Have you ever considered a fine = vintage pipe organ? Most pipe organ builders have access to them, or even have = them in stock. Does your church want to incur and expense or make an investment?   Just some things to think about...  
(back) Subject: Re: Neo Baroque From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2003 19:40:08 -0700       RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > > Hi Bruce: > > We have just come through the driest > period of organ building, the neo-baroque. The sounds for the > most part were quite unpleasant. People will come back to hear > the organ again, when the dust completely settles, and it will. > Snip   I am not interested in a dialogue on neo-Baroque. It has its good points and its bad ones. However, I think you would find it very difficult to prove your assertion in the paragraph above about an audience-neo-Baroque relationship. Most of the organs in the country are not neo-Baroque. There are still many organs around from the teens, twenties, thirties, forties and fifties that are not neo-Baroque.   One could even more strongly argue that audiences left because of electronic organs since there are far more of them around than = neo-Baroque.   Also, many of the organs built during the "neo-Baroque period" were not neo-Baroque organs. Most of the major builders continued to build various versions of American Classic. Casavant, Holtkamp and Schlicker were the main neo-Baroque builders.   Its OK not to like neo-Baroque organs. But please don't blame them for things that are not their fault.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2003 21:43:03 -0500   At 08:23 PM 7/8/2003 -0500, you wrote:   >I know this sounds quite maudlin, like I've drunk too much, but I swear >I've not had a drop.   <snipping the good stuff -- y'all go back and make sure you read Glenda's whole original post!!>   >So even if it's not Thanksgiving, thanks to all of you.     Dear Glenda,   I'm certain that I'm only one of MANY here who not only gladly accept your =   thanks, but also offer our own thanks to you for your writings, and for your reminder to stop and appreciate the good things in life, no matter what our individual daily circumstances might be.   Tim (who is pleased and proud to be able to help such a great group of people communicate with each other via this List)