PipeChat Digest #3795 - Wednesday, July 9, 2003
 
Baldwin vs. Allen question
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Electronic parts availability
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Baldwin vs. Allen (Freud)
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Electronic parts availability
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Thanks
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Thanks
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Neo Baroque
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Electronic parts availability
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Warped visions, warped trackers
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Electronic communion wafers
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Electronic communion wafers
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Thanks
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE)
  by "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net>
Re: Warped visions, warped trackers
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Warped visions, warped trackers
  by "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com>
Re: Warped visions, warped trackers
  by "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Baldwin vs. Allen question From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 07:27:57 -0500   If you are using the electronic as a stop-gap instrument until you get a pipe organ installed - they why not just go with whatever brand is cheapest - and don't worry about what sounds best. Any of them will be functional and adequate - particularly for temporary use. (Besides - you don't want a wonderful sounding one, do you? - they might get to like it and forget about the pipe organ....) Maybe there is a dealer that would even lease one - so you wouldn't have an ownership committment.   Margo   > Well if you are addressing me in this comment, then please realize > again that the electronic instrument is intended at this time only as > an interim while we decide what we want to do for a permanent situation. > > > > Tyler W. Robertson Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United > Methodist Church, Temple, TX Organist, Baylor University Concert Choir > Organist, Accompanist, Baylor University Women's Chorus From: > TubaMagna@aol.com > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Electronic parts availability From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 08:37:24 EDT     --part1_13.1f6a2101.2c3d6684_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Most every electronic company has parts to repair most of the digital/computer organs. Ahlborn-Galanti, COS, Rodgers all do and Allen can get you a new computer = to "update" any older computer organ. Parts are there.   It is still a matter of cost, size, location and if we want what is best = and real.   At my Lutheran church by the way, we serve fake wafers but real wine. So = only part of us has of be real and some can be fake or artificial like the = flowers in the foyer.   keep practicing-God only wants our best=3D here is to the health of ALL that need good thoughts and prayers.   dale in Florida   --part1_13.1f6a2101.2c3d6684_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0">Most every electronic company has parts to = repair mo=3D st of the digital/computer organs.<BR> Ahlborn-Galanti, COS, Rodgers all do and Allen can get you a new computer = to=3D "update" any older computer organ.&nbsp; <BR> Parts are there.<BR> <BR> It is still a matter of cost, size, location and if we want what is best = and=3D real.<BR> <BR> At my Lutheran church by the way, we serve fake wafers but real wine. So = onl=3D y part of us has of be real and some can be fake or artificial like the = flow=3D ers in the foyer.<BR> <BR> keep practicing-God only wants our best=3D3D<BR> here is to the health of ALL that need good thoughts and prayers.<BR> <BR> dale in Florida</FONT></HTML>   --part1_13.1f6a2101.2c3d6684_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Baldwin vs. Allen (Freud) From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 08:55:59 EDT     --part1_67.14a28f83.2c3d6adf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   >Just as we used to expect our Rectal instrument at our Conservatory to = play it all,(i >understand this is not PC, but it was true at one time)   Is this a real Freudian slip? What kind of instruments do you practice on = in Conservatory?   Keith   --part1_67.14a28f83.2c3d6adf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:<BR> <BR> &gt;Just as we used to expect our Rectal instrument at our Conservatory to = p=3D lay it all,(i &gt;understand this is not PC, but it was true at one time) = <B=3D R> <BR> Is this a real Freudian slip?&nbsp; What kind of instruments do you = practice=3D on in Conservatory? <BR> <BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_67.14a28f83.2c3d6adf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Electronic parts availability From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 08:35:37 -0500   I believe this is the church which has contacted me several times about a problem with a pipe organ rebuild, is it not? I sympathize, and have offered to visit, and make a proposal to help. My offer has now been accepted, however. If you truly must have an interim electronic, I would suggest a used one. They depreciate worse than automobiles, so you often can find one which will do at a good price. It certainly would be prudent not to invest more than absolutely necessary on the interim instrument. Otherwise it might be more difficult to get rid of than otherwise. BTW, not all vintage instruments are devoid of the voices you seek!. Roy Redman   Tyler Robertson wrote:   > > > > > From: TubaMagna@aol.com > . Have you ever considered a fine vintage > > pipe organ? Most pipe organ builders have access to them, or even have > them in > > stock. > > Does your church want to incur and expense or make an investment? > > Just some things to think about... > > > > > > Well if you are addressing me in this comment, then please realize > again that the electronic instrument is intended at this time only as > an interim while we decide what we want to do for a permanent > situation. Also, I personally am not interested in a "vintage" > instrument. I need things like mixtures, strong reeds, 32' registers, > a fanfare trumpet and the like. Although historic instruments can be > nice to play on every once in a while, I need more to play with than a > 12 rank hook and hastings with the upper work consisting of only a 2' > flute. > > > > Tyler W. Robertson > Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist Church, > Temple, TX > Organist, Baylor University Concert Choir > Organist, Accompanist, Baylor University Women's Chorus > From: TubaMagna@aol.com > > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------- > STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE* "Pipe Up and > Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: > mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 09:39:49 -0500   Glenda, I always look forward to your contributions to this list. You are such a fine writer, such a delight to read! You ought to compile your memoirs from the three domains of the Florida courthouse scene, the organ world (not neglecting to recount the joys and horrors of your experience = at Saint Agatha's), and domestic adventures. It would be a very publishable book. You could make anything interesting, but these are already = inherently interesting subjects. I am quite serious!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 09:52:23 EDT     --part1_190.1d081442.2c3d7817_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Glenda,   From Salt Lake City, you are most welcome!   Bill   --part1_190.1d081442.2c3d7817_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D3 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Glenda,<BR> <BR> From Salt Lake City, you are most welcome!<BR> <BR> Bill</FONT></HTML>   --part1_190.1d081442.2c3d7817_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Neo Baroque From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 10:06:20 -0400   At 07:40 PM 2003-07-08 -0700, you wrote:     >RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > > > > Hi Bruce: > > > > We have just come through the driest > > period of organ building, the neo-baroque. The sounds for the > > most part were quite unpleasant. People will come back to hear > > the organ again, when the dust completely settles, and it will. > > >Snip > >I am not interested in a dialogue on neo-Baroque. It has its good >points and its bad ones. However, I think you would find it very >difficult to prove your assertion in the paragraph above about an >audience-neo-Baroque relationship. Most of the organs in the country >are not neo-Baroque. There are still many organs around from the teens, >twenties, thirties, forties and fifties that are not neo-Baroque. > >One could even more strongly argue that audiences left because of >electronic organs since there are far more of them around than = neo-Baroque. > >Also, many of the organs built during the "neo-Baroque period" were >not neo-Baroque organs. Most of the major builders continued to >build various versions of American Classic. Casavant, Holtkamp and >Schlicker were the main neo-Baroque builders. > >Its OK not to like neo-Baroque organs. But please don't blame them >for things that are not their fault. > >Del W. Case >Pacific Union College     Del,   My 2 cents worth................   What you say makes eminent sense. What I should also point out is that some so-called neo-baroque organs are quite good, and pleasant to listen = to.   About 20 years ago, I accidently bumped into the fellow who voiced the Flentrop that E. P. Biggs put in Harvard, and I asked him how the new Flentrops compared to that one. He said, we build more "baroque" organs now, that one was neo-baroque. I was surprised that that was his view of that organ. I know for a fact quite a number of people got the organ bug from listening to E. P. Biggs recordings of that organ, including myself.   Regarding audiences leaving the organ scene, I don't think one can blame electronic organs so much, because for the most part they never had a serious audience. I lay the blame more on the academic side of things, programming, etc. Not that I am against good informed scholarship, and performance, it is just that so much of it is out of touch that the average person doesn't care for it.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Re: Electronic parts availability From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 10:19:36 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3140590776_5273925 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 7/9/03 8:37 AM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > At my Lutheran church by the way, we serve fake wafers but real wine. So = =3D only > part of us has of be real and some can be fake or artificial like the = flo=3D wers > in the foyer. >=3D20 >=3D20 Dale: I=3DB9ve never even HEARD of them! What on earth is a =3DB3fake = wafer=3DB2?   Alan Freed Www.stlukesnyc.org   --B_3140590776_5273925 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Electronic parts availability</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 7/9/03 8:37 AM, = &quot;Keys4bach@aol.com&quo=3D t; &lt;Keys4bach@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><FONT SIZE=3D3D"4">At = my Luther=3D an church by the way, we serve fake wafers but real wine. So only part of = us=3D has of be real and some can be fake or artificial like the flowers in the = f=3D oyer.<BR> <BR> </FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><FONT = SIZE=3D3D"4"><BR> </FONT>Dale: &nbsp;I&#8217;ve never even HEARD of them! &nbsp;What on = earth=3D is a &#8220;fake wafer&#8221;?<BR> <BR> Alan Freed<BR> Www.stlukesnyc.org</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3140590776_5273925--    
(back) Subject: Warped visions, warped trackers From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 10:20:11 EDT   It is a common assertion that the only definition of a fine, historic instrument available for restoration or rebuilding means "saving that 4' = Flute D'Amour for Easter recessional." Mixture-laden, multiple-reed-battery, Tuba-wielding, REAL 32'-laden = pipe organs are more often discarded than 4-rank Hinners or 6-rank Molines. Spectacular organs are out there and available, and a few great ones have = recently been rebuilt and/or relocated by American firms, large and small. In the = past five years, many of them have had extensive press coverage, and it's a = shame that you missed the stoplists, photo spreads, and articles covering such installations across the nation. If the organ "community" is ignorant of the existence of these magnificent organs, unaware of their quality, and unacquainted with their = breathtaking grandeur, they frequenty end up paying way too much money for a = compromise, and become embittered. Educate yourself. Get out there. Educate yourself. Read. Listen. Read some more. You'd be quite surprised.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Electronic communion wafers From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 10:25:26 EDT   Solid state communion wafers, of course. You know Alan, a chip is a chip.   Seb Developing Matzoh as a leather substitute for pneumatics...  
(back) Subject: Re: Electronic communion wafers From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 10:36:04 -0400   On 7/9/03 10:25 AM, "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote:   > Solid state communion wafers, of course. > You know Alan, a chip is a chip. > Lawsy me! How could I have FORGOTTEN???   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Thanks From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 09:32:44 -0500   I really appreciate that, particularly coming from such a good and published author as yourself.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Randolph Runyon Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2003 9:40 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Thanks   Glenda, I always look forward to your contributions to this list. You are such a fine writer, such a delight to read! You ought to compile your memoirs from the three domains of the Florida courthouse scene, the organ world (not neglecting to recount the joys and horrors of your experience at Saint Agatha's), and domestic adventures. It would be a very publishable book. You could make anything interesting, but these are already inherently interesting subjects. I am quite serious!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin vs. Allen(PIPE) From: "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 10:51:04 -0400   Wow! We agree. I've grown really fond of open flutes and feel that the capped ones have been overdone for whatever reason. Interesting you mention the stringy principal in the pedal. Most of the organs we heard at the OHS convention this year had really nice Violoncello stops in the pedal. They are so useful. I think more churches would opt for pipe organs if so many organists could free themselves from the notion that every organ must do everything.   Bruce Cornely and the Baskerbeagles in the Muttastery of HowlingAcres: http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 Click to help some animals: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=3D308025421         ---------- Original Message ---------------------------------- From: RonSeverin@aol.com Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2003 17:53:43 EDT   <Now the type of organ I like is very similar to your 19th Century Gems. Lower pitched mixtures, fewer breaks. <snip> In considering reeds, the very first one in an organ should be the Oboe, the second a trumpet, the third a Cromorne.   Strings: the first to consider is a broad scale Salicional in the Swell and a Voix Celeste and a 4' companion if possible.   Colorful Flutes 8' and 4' and on the great Flute Harmonique and a Bourdon of lead, followed with a good blending Montre and Viola da Gamba build the chorus from there. You are right about the mixture, put it into the swell, a real firey one to go with the reeds coupled. A Quint and a Quarte de Nasard or fifteenth would be enough on a small spec.   Every Swell should have a Diapason 8' of some sort and the mutations if they are placed in the organ. A fourth reed, you guessed it a Vox Humana   Two or three augmented pedal ranks and you've got something. Open wood, a Bourdon and a stringy wide scaled principal 8'. 16' reed 12 notes from the manual trumpet.   ________________________________________________________________ This email has been scanned for viruses.      
(back) Subject: Re: Warped visions, warped trackers From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 11:06:42 EDT     --part1_1ca.d68c9ff.2c3d8982_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hi chatters:   There is something to be said about recycling a great older organ. The wait isn't quite so long, the costs competative, and you have essentially a new organ. There's some terrific pipe work out there. In the case of our friend looking for the right builder, it appears he is at square one on that one.=3D20 What I would like from him is a declaration of the size of the room, and the number of seats, also an available space for the pipes. The type of music of the denomination, and=3D20 traditions of the particular congregation. 32's and party horns don't make a successful organ. You don't put those in a building with a twelve foot ceiling, you get an electronic and be done with it. The design of a fine organ rests with a competant pipe organ builder. Most organist derived designs even from the old ivory knobs are poor to average. I could give example after example. Let the builder do his job, build pipe organs, and organists play them. I've seen too many organs possessing pretty stops that didn't blend or go together designed by organists including some wild ones on this list. Let the builder build.   My 2=3DA2   Ron Severin   --part1_1ca.d68c9ff.2c3d8982_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi chatters:<BR> <BR> There is something to be said about recycling a great older<BR> organ. The wait isn't quite so long, the costs competative,<BR> and you have essentially a new organ. There's some terrific<BR> pipe work out there. In the case of our friend looking for the<BR> right builder, it appears he is at square one on that one. <BR> What I would like from him is a declaration of the size of<BR> the room, and the number of seats, also an available space<BR> for the pipes. The type of music of the denomination, and <BR> traditions of the particular congregation. 32's and party horns<BR> don't make a successful organ. You don't put those in a building<BR> with a twelve foot ceiling, you get an electronic and be done with<BR> it. The design of a fine organ rests with a competant pipe organ<BR> builder. Most organist derived designs even from the old ivory<BR> knobs are poor to average. I could give example after example.<BR> Let the builder do his job, build pipe organs, and organists<BR> play them. I've seen too many organs possessing pretty stops<BR> that didn't blend or go together designed by organists including<BR> some wild ones on this list. Let the builder build.<BR> <BR> My 2=3DA2<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1ca.d68c9ff.2c3d8982_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Warped visions, warped trackers From: "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 10:21:42 -0500   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'><DIV> <P>Sebastian, </P> <P>I HAVE seen some of these organs around, however it has been rare. I = have seen some quite stunning four manual instruments that I would love to = have in my church, however, our chambers are only so large and we might = have to go with a combonation organ, at least for the 32's and perhaps the = 16' diapason. Our church is presented with quite a task. We have been = trying to get a new pipe organ in our building for the past seven years. = "We" took a chance on a local builder and an attractive price and recently = got burned. (I had not been working there yet)&nbsp;It is for this reason = that I am not completely sure about a vintage instrument. Many need = rebuilding or restoration before they should be again installed and that = can be quite costly. Our last organ was a II/26 Schudi built in 1983. = Obviously, it didnt take too long for the church to realize that this = organ had lived it's short life. So an organ from say 1930, as beautiful = as it could be, would shoot up red flags among the organ com <DIV></DIV>Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist = Church, Temple, TX <DIV></DIV>Organist, Baylor University Concert Choir <DIV></DIV>Organist, Accompanist, Baylor University Women's Chorus <DIV></DIV>200 Cottonwood Apt. 3 <DIV></DIV>Waco, TX 76706 <DIV></DIV>(254) 715-6309 <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>From: TubaMagna@aol.com <DIV></DIV>Reply-To: "PipeChat" <PIPECHAT@PIPECHAT.ORG> <DIV></DIV>To: pipechat@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>Subject: Warped visions, warped trackers <DIV></DIV>Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 10:20:11 EDT <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>It is a common assertion that the only definition of a fine, = historic <DIV></DIV>instrument available for restoration or rebuilding means = "saving that 4' Flute <DIV></DIV>D'Amour for Easter recessional." <DIV></DIV>Mixture-laden, multiple-reed-battery, Tuba-wielding, REAL = 32'-laden pipe <DIV></DIV>organs are more often discarded than 4-rank Hinners or 6-rank = Molines. <DIV></DIV>Spectacular organs are out there and available, and a few great = ones have recently <DIV></DIV>been rebuilt and/or relocated by American firms, large and = small. In the past <DIV></DIV>five years, many of them have had extensive press coverage, and = it's a shame <DIV></DIV>that you missed the stoplists, photo spreads, and articles = covering such <DIV></DIV>installations across the nation. <DIV></DIV>If the organ "community" is ignorant of the existence of these <DIV></DIV>magnificent organs, unaware of their quality, and unacquainted = with their breathtaking <DIV></DIV>grandeur, they frequenty end up paying way too much money for a = compromise, and <DIV></DIV>become embittered. <DIV></DIV>Educate yourself. <DIV></DIV>Get out there. <DIV></DIV>Educate yourself. <DIV></DIV>Read. <DIV></DIV>Listen. <DIV></DIV>Read some more. <DIV></DIV>You'd be quite surprised. <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>Sebastian M. Gluck <DIV></DIV>New York City <DIV></DIV>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" <DIV></DIV>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs &amp; = related topics <DIV></DIV>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV></div><br clear=3Dall><hr>Help STOP SPAM with <a = href=3D"http://g.msn.com/8HMXENUS/2731??PS=3D">the new MSN 8 </a> and get = 2 months FREE*</html>  
(back) Subject: Re: Warped visions, warped trackers From: "Tyler Robertson" <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 10:39:34 -0500   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'><DIV> <P>Ron,</P> <P>Here' some of the info you asked for. The church seats approximately = 800 persons. The choir loft seats 45 and rests right under the pipe = chambers. The sanctuary is definitely not ordinary. It is a semi-circular = church seating about 500 on the lower level in pews and the rest in a = balcony mimicking the lower level. The ceiling in essence is a dome. The = previous organ was of 26 ranks. 24 were upstairs in the main chambers with = the swell on the left and the great/pedal on the right. An additional 2 = ranks sat in a small expressive positiv division directly behind the = choir. The chambers were pretty full with this organ, however, one builder = commented that we could have a very successful three manual organ of about = 35 ranks if we removed the large 1914 pilcher swell box and made the = chambers into three separate rooms for each division, all expressive. The = height of the chambers is about 14'. The height of the room I would = estimate at about 30-35 feet. We are a methodist church, so our mu <DIV></DIV>Organist, Handbell Choir Director,First United Methodist = Church, Temple, TX <DIV></DIV>Organist, Baylor University Concert Choir <DIV></DIV>Organist, Accompanist, Baylor University Women's Chorus <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>From: RonSeverin@aol.com <DIV></DIV>Reply-To: "PipeChat" <PIPECHAT@PIPECHAT.ORG> <DIV></DIV>To: pipechat@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>Subject: Re: Warped visions, warped trackers <DIV></DIV>Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 11:06:42 EDT <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>Hi chatters: <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>There is something to be said about recycling a great older <DIV></DIV>organ. The wait isn't quite so long, the costs competative, <DIV></DIV>and you have essentially a new organ. There's some terrific <DIV></DIV>pipe work out there. In the case of our friend looking for the <DIV></DIV>right builder, it appears he is at square one on that one. <DIV></DIV>What I would like from him is a declaration of the size of <DIV></DIV>the room, and the number of seats, also an available space <DIV></DIV>for the pipes. The type of music of the denomination, and <DIV></DIV>traditions of the particular congregation. 32's and party horns =   <DIV></DIV>don't make a successful organ. You don't put those in a = building <DIV></DIV>with a twelve foot ceiling, you get an electronic and be done = with <DIV></DIV>it. The design of a fine organ rests with a competant pipe = organ <DIV></DIV>builder. Most organist derived designs even from the old ivory <DIV></DIV>knobs are poor to average. I could give example after example. <DIV></DIV>Let the builder do his job, build pipe organs, and organists <DIV></DIV>play them. I've seen too many organs possessing pretty stops <DIV></DIV>that didn't blend or go together designed by organists = including <DIV></DIV>some wild ones on this list. Let the builder build. <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>My 2=A2 <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>Ron Severin <DIV></DIV></div><br clear=3Dall><hr>Tired of spam? Get <a = href=3D"http://g.msn.com/8HMXENUS/2734??PS=3D">advanced junk mail = protection</a> with MSN 8.</html>