PipeChat Digest #3820 - Saturday, July 19, 2003
 
Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
A Cool Idea  X Posted
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
The Scout Report
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 10:27:13 -0400   On 7/17/03 5:49 PM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote:   > The bowl shape above his head dispersed the sound evenly, and the raised > position of the pulpit helped greatly.   And do NOT carpet the floor of that pulpit!   Alan    
(back) Subject: A Cool Idea X Posted From: "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 17:07:36 -0400   The Following is excerpted from The Scout Report, a weekly newsletter type email by the Internet Scout Project at The University of Wisconsin. Thought people might be interested in it and maybe even want to contribute.   Cheers, Mack             15. Choral Public Domain Library [PDF, MIDI, MP3] http://cpdl.snaptel.com/index.php   Begun in 1998, the Choral Public Domain Library (CPDL) is a free sheet music Web site which provides scores, primarily for choral music. It currently offers users over 5,000 scores to choose from -- most of which are in the public domain. Users can search the CPDL database using composer or title or browse by composer's name. The project lists over 200 volunteers who have contributed scores to the Web site; while new users can join CPDL and submit their scores or link their own sites and scores. CPDL also offers a newsletter which users can subscribe to and a nicely organized Related Links section. [REB]      
(back) Subject: The Scout Report From: "mack02445" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 17:11:25 -0400   Should have thought of this when I sent the first email but if you are interested in subscribing to the Scout Report here is the link to do so.   http://scout.wisc.edu/        
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 19:38:00 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, July 18, 2003 4:00 AM Subject: Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger) Arthur Harrison could make ANY > instrument sound musical in ANY room; though fashions > have moved on, and his voicing genius is not > appreciated fully these days.   I think you will find these days it is rather more appreciated on the western side of the Atlantic than on its eastern shores, where the symphonic revival has gone a lot further than in Britain.   > Interestingly, Willis III was hopeless!!   I'm glad to hear you think this. I think Henry Willis III's instruments are monumentally boring. The Westminster Cathedral organ was largely the work of Lewis, and much of the Liverpool Cathedral organ was built by Henry Willis II before World War I and then stored. The fine organ in the Jesuit Church in Mayfair was the result of collaboration between organist Guy Weitz and then Willis employee G. Donald Harrison. What else is there of Henry Willis III of any interest? The Skinner and Aeolian-Skinner firms in the U.S.A. claimed to have been influenced by Willis, but this was probably more advertising hype than anything else. Henry Willis III was very frustrated because Skinner in supposedly adopting Willis features proceeded to alter them out of recognition. If truth were told, in his 1925 visit to England, Skinner spent a lot longer studying Harrison's work at St. Mary Redcliffe than he did studying the work of Willis.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics (was: Living with a Schnitger) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2003 03:00:25 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   That is such a fascinating reply!   I really wasn't aware of the Skinner/Harrison connection at all, but I can certainly believe it and understand it.   The voicing at St.Mary Recliffe surpasses the mere passage of time.... like Fred Astaire's dancing; very old fashioned but sheer "class".   Actually, a lot of the Liverpool organ was lost in an air-raid on Liverpool when the parts for the organ were stored in the old chapel in the grounds of the cathedral. It set them back a long time, but I suspect that they merely copied the original designs.   Interestingly, the current technician at Liverpool and Ian Treacy himself, always say that most Willis 3 organs are terrible, but at Liverpool, he got it absolutely right for the first time. By any standards, it is a superb instrument to rival any in the world.   With that in mind, I suppose Willis 3 deserves a place in organ history.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote: > > I think you will find these days it is rather more > appreciated on the > western side of the Atlantic than on its eastern > shores, where the symphonic > revival has gone a lot further than in Britain. >   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/