PipeChat Digest #3842 - Thursday, July 31, 2003
 
Felix Hell in Norway (x-post)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? was Ideas on contemporary music via organ
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Where did the organ go?
  by "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infionline.net>
Re: Allen or Rodgers?
  by "Jim Hailey" <jhaileya10@charter.net>
Re: Allen or Rodgers?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Allen or Rodgers?
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
sweet sweet spirit of the organ
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Norway (x-post) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 23:00:15 -0400   With the permission of Mr. Ben Chi of piporg-L, I'm happy to forward this post that originally appeared on that list. The basic report is most interesting (I think); the links lead to wonderful sites. Be sure to click on small photos to get stunning larger photos.   Alan   Here is a postcard from Norway, from my friend Kyrre Svarva in Trondheim. I= t contains some fascinating links to Norwegian web sites with photos of very old churches.   Of interest to me is the mention, in the site for the Selbu Church, of the town of Hommelvik, near Trondheim, which is the hometown of my paternal grandmother, Gurina Erikson Lokken (1872-1973). She used to talk about this place.   The V=E6rnes Church is from the 12th century, said to be the oldest extant building in Norway. When one sees these church photos it is easy to understand why so many Norwegian Lutheran churches in America look exactly like this.   The site for the Molde Cathedral was created by Kyrre Svarva, and he has generously mentioned my name at the bottom for the assistance I gave him with the English translation.   The site for the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim is very interesting, of course. The historical bit about the death of King (Saint) Olav also has a family link. Mother's relatives trace our family back to Tore Hund, the Viking, whose men defeated and slew King Olav at the Battle of Stiklestad i= n 1030.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kyrre Svarva" <kyrre@NVG.NTNU.NO> To: <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2003 9:49 PM Subject: Felix Hell in Norway - 1   > Felix Hell in Norway - 1 > > Felix' first concerts were at Molde, Tingvoll and Kristiansund. > I hoped to be able to attend at least one of these, but that > proved not to be possible for practical reasons. I asked someone > at Molde to report, but he has been too busy to send me anyhing yet. > > Molde and Kristiansund, comparatively big towns south of Trondheim, > on the Atlantic coast, both have new organs. The organ at Molde is > by Rieger, and the one at Kristiansund by the Swedish builder > Gr=F6nlund. As I understood from Felix, both instruments were to his > liking, and his father (the engineer) commented on the advanced > electronic combinations system of the Gr=F6nlund organ, incorporating > a diagniostic and program that was even able to correct certain > kinds of malfunctions "while you wait" on its own. So much for the > organs at Molde and Kristiansund - I have not seen any of these > instruments so I cannot say much more about them. > > The audiences, however, was a different story. At Molde > (http://www.hf.ntnu.no/mus/org/molde/molde-e.htm), about 30 people > turned up, and this really is not much in this church, with several > hundred seats. I was more than a little surprised to hear this, as > Molde was full of people at the time due to the yearly Molde Jazz > Festival, which is a big event with international performers and a > lot of visitors. And on top of this, Israeli prime minister Ariel > Sharon visited Molde to engage in talks with the Norwegian prime > minister only a few days prior to Felix' concert, and this also > attracted people to town by the busload. However, the crowds > visiting these two events obviously are not the same who would like > to spend the evening at an organ concert. And this was not the worst > part of the story - at Nordlandet > (http://www.kristiansund.kommune.no/nordlandetkirke/) a measly crowd > of 10 showed up. No further comment to that. > > At Tingvoll, however > (http://www.tingvoll.org/tingvollkirka/index.html; organ by Ott), it > was a different story. Tingvoll, some 50 km inland from Kristiansund > by road, is a small local community in a rural setting, so you might > think this is where the risk of having a small audience would be > highest. But things turned out differently. I am not sure how many > seats Tingvoll church has, but as I understand, the house was nearly > full. They must have apprecialted Felix' playing, too. When it > became evident that an encore was called for, it was announced that > if someone was particularly interested in seeing Felix play, it > would be possible to visit the comparatively large gallery, > extending down one side of the church, for the encore. The gallery > became absolutely packed with people, I dare say providing a unique > experience for performer as well as audience. > > Here in Trondheim, Felix has already held one of a total of three lunchti= me > recitals at Nidaros cathedral (http://www.nidarosdomen.no/english/). The > lunchtime recitals, held most days during the summer, are short events la= sting > 15 to 20 minutes. With no particular advance announcements, they are inte= nded > for the masses of tourists that visit the cathedral every day during the > tourist season. Eager to hear Felix play, I managed to take some time off > work, and I did not regret. Some 150 tourists (and a few locals) sat down= for > the recital, and we were treated to a very nice Bach program on the Wagne= r > organ. > > And then saturday 26th July was the first evening concert here in > the Trondheim area, at Selbu church. Not exactly on most tourists' > itineraries, Selbu is located some 70 km east-southeast of > Trondheim, on lake Selbusj=F8en. I have found very little about Selbu > church on the web, but an image can be found in the lower left > corner of > http://www.reuber-norwegen.de/SoerTroendelag/BilderTab_SoerTroendelagSelbu.= h tml . > The organ at Selbu, built by the Danish firm Bruno Christensen & > Sons, has about 25 voices in a classic Hauptwerk - Schwellwerk - Pedal > configuration, but with a three manuals & pedal console, the > middle manual being a coupling manual on which stops from the > Schwellwerk as well as the Hauptwerk can be drawn. The organ has > mechanical playing action and electric stop action and a 256-step > sequencing combination system. The church is of stone, rather > spacious, but with a not-too-high wooden ceiling, providing an > acoustic situation with a moderate reverberation that is very > pleasant indeed to the listener but can be unforgiving to the > performer. Felix played the following programme: > > J.S.Bach: > - Prelude, G major, BWV568 > - Prelude & Fugue, a minor, BWV543 > - Chorale "Ich ruf' zu dir" from "Orgelb=FCchlein", BWV639 > - Triosonata no. 1, E Flat major, BWV525 > - Fantasy & Fugue, g minor, BWV542 > Mendelssohn: > - Sonata no.6 op.65 > Karg-Elert: > - Choral fantasy "Nun danket alle Gott" > > About 50 people had acted on the advertisement in the paper saying > "The organ genius Felix Hell (17 years)" and "be sure to appear > early", and this was a responsive audience indeed. Listening > intently, they followed the tradition of waiting till the end with > the applause at church concerts, but then "all hell broke loose", if > you'll pardon the expression. Playing the whole BWV565 as an encore > only served to increase their enthusiasm, and Felix was compelled to > play the toccata from Widor's fifth as a final encore. This was my > first full-length concert experience with Felix at the console, and > I must say I was amazed at his excellent playing. Not only does > it seem that most technical problems that organists can have are > sorted out, he is also able to interpret the music in a way that > makes it truly captivating, at times nearly hypnotizing. To me, the > optimal organ concert experience experience is a well-chosen > repertoire, played in a technically proficient way, and not only > with feeling, but in a way that captivates me and arouses my > feelings as well, and not leaves me sitting there counting the > number of lightbulbs in the fixtures or something while waiting for > what is coming next. It became evident that Felix is able to create > a situation where such an optimal situation can occur. He blew the > roof off the place. > > The next evening (sunday), Felix played an evening concert at V=E6rnes > church, a little over 30 km west from Trondheim (Some winter images > can be seen at http://www.gfsa.no/2164.htm). This church is claimed > to be "Norway's oldest building still standing", with thick, > romanesque stone walls and an 11th century wooden ceiling. The > location is a little unfavorable as it is close to the end of > Trondheim airport's main runway, but we were not disturbed during > the concert. V=E6rnes is a somewhat smaller church than Selbu, and > with the 18-voice 2M/P tracker organ located at floor level, built > by the local builder Thorkildsen in 1965, the situation was somewhat > more intimate than at Selbu. A short article in the local newspaper > about Felix' merits brought in an audience of about 50, and here is > what they were treated to: > > J.S. Bach: > - Prelude & Fugue G major, BWV568 > - "O mensch bewein dein s=FCnde gross", BWV622 > - Triosonata no. 1, E Flat major, BWV525 > - Prelude & Fugue, e minor, BWV548 > J.G.Rheinberger: > - "Abendfriede", op.156 > Mendelssohn: > - Sonata No.4 Op.65 > Mozart: > - Fantasy, f minor, KV 608 > > Clearly, given the limited resources of the V=E6rnes organ, playing > this kind of programme may not be the easiest way out, and Felix > admitted that preparing for this concert had been "a lot of work", > as he put it. His preparatory efforts had not been in vain, though. > The concert was excellent, the audience was taken in by Felix' > performance and responded enthusiastically. As an encore, Felix > played the last movement of Mendelssohn's first sonata. He might > have had to do a second encore if the local organist, who had > introduced Felix to the audience before the concert, had not broken > the applause off to thank Felix in a short speech. To me, the most > notable experience at this concert, aside from the beautiful > Rheinberger, which I had not heard before, was Felix' interpretation > of Mozart's Fantasy, and how he was able to make the organ seem to > grow during this performance. This impression was even further > enhanced in the encore. Really excellent. > > On a side note, not far from V=E6rnes is a place that is a bit of a > tourist attraction for a somewhat curious reason. The name of the > place is Hell - believe it or not. This is not a big place, but it > does have a railway station. The classic postcard from Hell, sold by > the thousands, I believe, shows (described from memory) the station > building at Hell against a threatening red and black sunset sky. > There is a large, black locomotive puffing steam at the platform, > and on a side building, a large sign reads, "Gods expedition". > Amusing, of course, to the English spoken, this sign in Norwegian > means "Goods expedition", i.e. the place to go if you have something > to send by rail. As for the place name "Hell" it is probably derived > from old norse "hellir", meaning "cave". Naturally, Felix and his > father discovered this place, and went over to take their photos. > Incidentally, while we are on this type of subject, there is a place > near the city of Bergen on the west coast of Norway that is called > "Paradis" (i.e. Paradise). So you see, we have it all here in > Norway. And for those of you who have wondered, Hell *does* freeze > over. It happens regularly, every winter. ;-) > > Back in Trondheim, there are now a few days of preparations for the > two remaining lunchtime recitals, and the main concert at Nidaros > cathedral Thursday evening. And then the last stop is Bergen. > We'll have to get back to this later. > > Greetings from Trondheim, > K. > ------------ > Kyrre Svarva > Trondheim, Norway >    
(back) Subject: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? was Ideas on contemporary music via organ From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 23:03:23 EDT   In a message dated 07/29/2003 11:12:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time, cremona@cervo.net writes:   > I've found that the first ingredient in translating contemporary piano > music to organ is to "feel" it. Learn the music on the piano first so that you > get a good feel of its movement and what parts are more critical.   That's known as JAZZ! (and then...)   > > If you are in a place where more than one instrument is used (i.e., piano > and organ, guitars, etc) it much easier if you don't try to "do it all" but > rather avoid duplicating what others are playing. This gives a great deal of > freedom to explore the other voices in the accompaniment.   That's definitely JAZZ!!!   > > Good luck. It really can be fun.   Nothing but "JAZZ"!   Hey Bruce,   Don't they call that style of musical playing, "JAZZ?"   <grin>   Musically, Stan Krider    
(back) Subject: Re: Where did the organ go? From: "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infionline.net> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 22:07:52 -0500   Hi Tom....from 2 hours north of you in W. Ky.... Nice to see someone on the list from close by! Anxious to hear all the news of the new organ/symphony hall....   J. Nathan   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2003 9:02 PM Subject: Re: Where did the organ go?     > > I live in the city that calls itself "Music City USA" and is also home of the > Grand Ole Opry (> Anyway, the good news is that Music City is getting a brand new, > neo-classical symphony hall that will be completed in 2006, and it will have a large $2.5 > million plus Schoenstein organ. > > Tom > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Allen or Rodgers? From: "Jim Hailey" <jhaileya10@charter.net> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 22:22:30 -0500   I agree Patrick. This argument has been beat to death, for at least the past 5 years. It is a no win and sooner or laters, someone's temper will flare.   Jim H ----- Original Message ----- From: "Patrick Kujawa" <pkujawa@baystar.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2003 3:44 PM Subject: RE: Allen or Rodgers?     >> Sorry, but I am so tired of this argument. > Patrick > >> -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Alan > Freed > Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2003 3:12 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Allen or Rodgers? > > On 7/29/03 12:31 PM, "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> wrote: > >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Allen or Rodgers? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 23:09:26 -0400   On 7/30/03 10:57 PM, "Wuxuzusu@aol.com" <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> wrote:   > Have you ever stood in the pipe chamber while someone played a "real" pip= e > organ?=20 >=20 > =80=80=80Yes indeed! >=20 > Have you ever stood in the middle of an orchestra while it was playing? >=20 > =80=80=80Yes indeed! >=20 > To me, there is something, an ambiance perhaps, >=20 > =80=80=80You=B9re putting it mildly. >=20 > Alan >=20      
(back) Subject: Re: Allen or Rodgers? From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 20:09:49 -0700     --Apple-Mail-2--290588937 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed   Stan, I think you're right on the money. Of course pipe organs are=20 superior. I don't think anyone here would dispute that.   However, having a nice pipe organ -- or a pipe organ at all -- isn't=20 always an option. Because of that, I'm always interested in which=20 digital organ maker is doing wonderful things to appeal to that market.   I am no snob. I cut my teeth as an organist at the age of 12 on an=20 Essex 640, and given the option, I'd have one in my living room=20 tomorrow. Of course I always love to play a pipe organ when I can get=20 my hands on one, though.   Eric     On Wednesday, July 30, 2003, at 07:57 PM, Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote:   > Del and all, > > This is my personal opinion. > > Have you ever stood in the pipe chamber while someone played a "real"=20=   > pipe organ? Have you ever stood in the middle of an orchestra while it=20=   > was playing? > > To me, there is something, an ambiance perhaps, about the acoustical=20=   > instrument producing sound from its entire surface that cannot be=20 > reproduced through speakers. Personally I notice it when bass notes=20 > are being played. Perhaps that is because the bass (instruments or=20 > pipes) are much larger and have more surface from which the sound=20 > emanates. > > Just a personal observation, mind you! It's different, not better or=20=   > worse. (I'm sinking deeper, aren't I?) (Gulp!) <smile> > > Musically, > Stan Krider > > In a message dated 07/29/2003 11:12:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 > dcase@puc.edu writes: > > > There is something I really don't understand.=A0 If the electronic = sound=20 > is > so wonderful, why are the pipes necessary?=A0 Since so many people = seem > to hear with their eyes, one wonders if it is primarily to help people > think what they are hearing really is coming only from pipes. > > Del W. Case > Pacific Union College > > >   --Apple-Mail-2--290588937 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/enriched; charset=ISO-8859-1   Stan, I think you're right on the money. Of course pipe organs are superior. I don't think anyone here would dispute that.     However, having a nice pipe organ -- or a pipe organ at all -- isn't always an option. Because of that, I'm always interested in which digital organ maker is doing wonderful things to appeal to that market.=20     I am no snob. I cut my teeth as an organist at the age of 12 on an Essex 640, and given the option, I'd have one in my living room tomorrow. Of course I always love to play a pipe organ when I can get my hands on one, though.     Eric       On Wednesday, July 30, 2003, at 07:57 PM, Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote:     <excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>Del and all,     This is my personal opinion.     Have you ever stood in the pipe chamber while someone played a "real" pipe organ? Have you ever stood in the middle of an orchestra while it was playing?     To me, there is something, an ambiance perhaps, about the acoustical instrument producing sound from its entire surface that cannot be reproduced through speakers. Personally I notice it when bass notes are being played. Perhaps that is because the bass (instruments or pipes) are much larger and have more surface from which the sound emanates.     Just a personal observation, mind you! It's different, not better or worse. (I'm sinking deeper, aren't I?) (Gulp!) <<smile>     Musically,   Stan Krider     In a message dated 07/29/2003 11:12:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time, dcase@puc.edu writes:   </smaller></fontfamily>     There is something I really don't understand.=A0 If the electronic sound is   so wonderful, why are the pipes necessary?=A0 Since so many people seem   to hear with their eyes, one wonders if it is primarily to help people   think what they are hearing really is coming only from pipes.     Del W. Case   Pacific Union College         </excerpt>=   --Apple-Mail-2--290588937--    
(back) Subject: sweet sweet spirit of the organ From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 23:12:16 EDT   Ever hear Fats waller play the Estey church organ in his early recordings?   Perhaps Diane should try to play those hymns that "just do not work on = organ" by playing the organ as though it were a piano.   Musically, Stan Krider   Diane S. wrote: > > Actually, there are a couple of hymns in our hymnbook that just do not > work on organ. I rearranged one, the other I finally just gave up and > play it on the piano. One is "Sweet, Sweet Spirit".> > >