PipeChat Digest #3754 - Sunday, June 15, 2003
 
Re: Organs in Italy
  by "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at>
Re: public domain organ music update(xpost)
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: organs in Italy
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: organs in Italy
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
RE: Starting Out
  by "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
re: Public domain organ music link
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net>
I tremble in anticipation
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
public domain organ music update
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Holy Rosary Casavanta, Toronto, 1949
  by <Lewwill@aol.com>
Re: public domain organ music update
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net>
Scandinavian music recordings
  by "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net>
Re: Holy Rosary Casavanta, Toronto, 1949
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organs in Italy From: "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 12:07:29 +0200   Hi Scott,   the Italian organ landscape is completely different compared to e.g. = Germany, England or the US. Especially with historic instruments you may encounter anything. Generally, Italian organs don't have as many manuals, but more stops per manual and a reduced (if existing) pedal. (e.g. Sant'Alessandro = and Sant' Anna at Bergamo, with 1 manual and 31 stops resp. 2 manuals and 49 stops, the latter having a 24 note pedal board).   Some organs have so-called "echoes" which are often quite far away from = the main instrument (e.g. at the opposit side of the church). In practice that =   means 1 manual main organ, 2 manual echo.   Concerning the stops. First, forget mixtures. They are not part of Italian =   organ building. Instead, Italian organs have a ripieno, i.e.: Principals = 16', 8', 4', 2 2/3', 2', 1 1/3' 1' and even further.   Further there is often a solo flute or a flute choir e.g. 8', 5 1/3' and = 4'.   If you pull a stop called "Fiffaro" and you think, man, this stop is out = of tune - it is not. It is the pendant to the "voce humana".   As a literature I would try maybe Girolamo Frescobaldi, "Fiori Musicali".   Hope that helps a bit :-)   regards, T. Mohr   -- DI Thomas Mohr Institute of Cancer Research - Vienna University Borschkegasse 8a A-1090 Vienna Austria Tel ++43 (1) 4277 65160 Fax ++43 (1) 4277 65196    
(back) Subject: Re: public domain organ music update(xpost) From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 07:40:32 -0300   Hi, Jonathan,   > I would be glad to post a link for the first 8 pages of volume 6 if there is sufficient interest...     Yes, I'm interested. Please, send me the link.   Regards, Domitila Ballesteros        
(back) Subject: Re: organs in Italy From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 12:03:01 +0000   I don't think it's all as bad as it sounds. I believe Michael Barone organised a trip to Italy recently - maybe PIP-ORG members who went on = this would be able to help, and I came across the Mascioni web-site, of which nobody has contradicted my suggestion that this was the world's oldest = organ building firm still in family hands - www.mascioni-organs.com There are some sound samples on the site, and though, depending on your computer = sound system, and allowing for the fact that it is a recording (I would have though you have to be pretty dim not to realise this, but an argument got going elesewhere on this subject!) - they sound magnificent. I have = played some pretty dreadful instruments in Southern Italy, but the acoustics are usually wonderful, and there is an evocatively "decayed" atmosphere - a = bit like the old local Italian trains in the 60's. Lots of velvet and vast = seats in which the springs had seen better days. JF www.johnfoss.gr   _________________________________________________________________ MSN 8 helps eliminate e-mail viruses. Get 2 months FREE*. http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/virus    
(back) Subject: Re: organs in Italy From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 14:18:06 +0200     From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Sent: Saturday, June 14, 2003 2:03 PM     > ... and I came across the Mascioni web-site, of which > nobody has contradicted my suggestion that this was the world's oldest organ > building firm still in family hands   Have you checked Marcussen for this? I don't know if they still in family hand but if so they may be older.   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: RE: Starting Out From: "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 09:10:32 -0400   It seems to me that there was a young lawyer in Singapore named Jonathan Tan who posted to some of the organ lists a while back. I remember that he listed some of the organs in Singapore and some of his teachers. You might want to consider looking in the archives of piporg-l and pipechat to see if there are any references which might be useful to you.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Chapman Gonz=E1lez Sent: Friday, June 13, 2003 11:16 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Starting Out   It seems to me that there is an extension of the Peabody Conservatory/Johns Hopkins university in Singapore. I know its a big place, but you might try to contact them. I'm sure they're trying to attract students.   Chapman in Baltimore   > From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> > Reply-To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2003 11:59:11 -0400 > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Starting Out >=20 > On 6/13/03 7:26 AM, "Phreaker" <melchizedek@phreaker.net> wrote: >=20 >> Hey... I live in Singapore and would like to learn how to play a pipe >> organ. I currently play an electronic one (no pipes... but yamaha)... Anyone >> has and advice or ideas? i definitely cannot afford to rent a theater to >> practice... >=20 > Victor, do you have any connection with any kind of church? Or do you have > a friend who has such a connection? Not always, but quite often, churches > are quite accommodating about allowing their instruments to be used by > students. >=20 > It might help to know what training you already have. Do you play the > piano? Do you have a teacher on piano or organ now? Have you checked the > music departments of any local colleges or universities? If you WANT a > teacher, but don't know how to find one, why not enquire of the organist at > the Anglican (Episcopal) cathedral in Singapore? >=20 > AND! Welcome to the list! >=20 > Alan Freed > Www.stlukesnyc.org >=20 >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: re: Public domain organ music link From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 08:01:04 -0700   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0057_01C3324B.1A657AA0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   OK OK! =3D20   My goodness.... what an overwhelming response <grin>   http://www.blackiris.com/orwig/Scores/LesMaitres/vol6/page_1-8.pdf   Bear in mind most of these volumes were written for parish organists in mind, so there are many pieces in them suitable for manuals only or even for use on harmonium. Also, (as one would expect in a =3D collection this size) the pieces are of varying quality....=3D20   HOWever... there ARE some real gems here, and this stuff also makes good fodder for sight-reading practice (or last-minute organist panic)   Enjoy,   Jonathan     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.489 / Virus Database: 288 - Release Date: 6/10/03 ------=3D_NextPart_000_0057_01C3324B.1A657AA0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1106" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>OK OK!&nbsp; </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>My goodness.... what an overwhelming = =3D response=3D20 &lt;grin&gt;</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.blackiris.com/orwig/Scores/LesMaitres/vol6/page_1-8.pd= =3D f">http://www.blackiris.com/orwig/Scores/LesMaitres/vol6/page_1-8.pdf</A>= =3D </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Bear in mind most of these volumes = were =3D written for=3D20 parish organists</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>in mind, so there are many pieces in = =3D them suitable=3D20 for manuals only</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>or even for use on harmonium.&nbsp; = =3D Also, (as one=3D20 would expect in a collection</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>this size) the pieces are of varying = =3D quality....=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>HOWever... there ARE some real gems = =3D here, and this=3D20 stuff also makes</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>good fodder for sight-reading = practice =3D (or=3D20 last-minute organist panic)</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Enjoy,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Jonathan</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><BR>---<BR>Outgoing mail is certified = =3D Virus=3D20 Free.<BR>Checked by AVG anti-virus system (<A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.grisoft.com">http://www.grisoft.com</A>).<BR>Version: = =3D 6.0.489 /=3D20 Virus Database: 288 - Release Date: 6/10/03</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0057_01C3324B.1A657AA0--    
(back) Subject: I tremble in anticipation From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 16:45:51 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Wow!   I was browsing the organ lists for the Netherlands and came across something I didn't know existed........which will not be a surprise to anyone!   THERE, in the middle of Holland, is a 4-manual, electric action Walcker organ near Arnhem, in the town of Doesburg at the Martinikerk.   I have always wanted to hear a Walcker organ, as part of my education, so I went into the organ concert listings of "het orgel", only to find that there IS a recital going on during my anticipated visit.   I shouldn't have been too surprised, because Holland has many, many styles of instrument, including organs by Cavaille-Coll, UK 19th century builders, a number of Scandanavian/German instruments and, of course, the home grown romantic organs.   I have played the organ at the Haarlem concerthall, which never seems to get a mention because it is an unrestored, re-built Cavaille-Coll.......sounds French enough to me, and it is worth visiting just to see the casework and those lovely tin-rich display pipes.   Of course, the OTHER St.Bavon at Haarlem is the RC Basilica, with its four-manual romantic instrument which makes some fine sounds.   The possibility of hearing the Walcker certainly has me interested though, apart from the possibility of hearing the "usual" Baroque instruments.   I suppose it is just too much to expect Reger on the programme, but we shall see.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: public domain organ music update From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 12:10:28 -0400   Any copyright issues here??   david baker    
(back) Subject: Holy Rosary Casavanta, Toronto, 1949 From: <Lewwill@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 12:24:28 EDT     --part1_18a.1b6ed516.2c1ca63c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable       Dear Listers   The organ of Holy Rosary Church, Toronto, was designed by Quentin = Maclean=3D20 (1896-1962), a pupil of Reger (composition) & Straube (organ) in the early = y=3D ears=3D20 of the 20th century.=3DA0 Though British, he was educated mostly in = Germany, a=3D nd=3D20 was interned there during the First World War.=3DA0 After the war, he = served a=3D s=3D20 assistant organist at Westminster Cathedral before becoming involved in = the=3D20=3D UK=3D20 cinema organ scene from the early 1920s until 1939, when he emigrated to = Can=3D ada.=3D20 He broadcast continually on the CBC, in both classical and popular = idioms,=3D20 until his death on July 9, 1962, in addition to his duties as=3D20 organist/choirmaster at Holy Rosary Church.   The instrument was built by Casavant in 1949 to a specification prepared = by=3D20 Quentin Maclean in consultation with Stephen Stoot.=3DA0 Mr. Maclean's = descrip=3D tion=3D20 of the organ is as follows:=3DA0=3D20   "This organ is an attempt to combine some of the best features of the=3D20 'baroque' and 'romantic' schools of organ design in an instrument of quite = m=3D odest=3D20 dimensions.=3DA0 Each manual division provides a complete and independent = flue=3D =3D20 ensemble, approximately equal in power but well-contrasted in tone = quality,=3D20=3D similar=3D20 to the 'Hauptwerk' and 'Oberwerk' of the organs of the Bach period.   "Both the Great and Swell sections are under expression, there being no = fewe=3D r=3D20 than 64 shutters on the Swell side.=3DA0 The Pedal division is = unenclosed,=3D20 consisting of Bourdon, Gemshorn-Quint (10-2/3'), metal Octave, and = Trombone,=3D each=3D20 available in unison and octave pitches; the enclosed manual doubles are = also=3D =3D20 playable in this department, giving the grand total of 12 Pedal speaking = sto=3D ps,=3D20 quite an innovation in a two-manual organ.   "Unusual mechanical features are the provision of a tremulant to the = Great=3D20 division and the placing of the coupler drawknobs alongside those of the = Swe=3D ll,=3D20 instead of over the top keyboard as usual.=3DA0 This makes for a better = balanc=3D ed=3D20 console layout in a small organ.   "Some interesting tonal departures from the standard pattern are found in = th=3D e=3D20 Schultze-type Diapason chorus; the Swell 'Trompette,' a real, fiery = French=3D20 specimen; the Spitzflute Celeste on the Great; and the unified Gamba on = Swel=3D l=3D20 and pedal, which serves in a threefold capacity as a bright Swell = Principal,=3D a=3D20 flue oboe and a String Bass all in one -- truly a remakable example of = tonal=3D =3D20 versatility."   The original 1949 specification follows. After Maclean's death, it = was=3D20 radically altered:   GREAT (enclosed) 16' Quintaton 8' Open Diapason 8' Hohl Flute 8' Spitzflute 8' Flute Celeste (TC) 4' Principal 2-2/3' Twelfth 2' Fifteenth =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Tremulant =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Sub Octave=3D20 =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Unison Off=3D20 =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Octave=3D20 =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   SWELL=3D20 16' Contra Gamba 8' Horn Diapason 8' Doppelflute 8' Salicional 8' Gamba 8' Gamba Celeste 4' Octave Gamba 4' Rohrflute =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Cornet (12/15/17) 8' Trumpet 8' Vox Humana =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Tremulant =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Sub Octave =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Unison Off =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Octave =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0=3D20   PEDAL 16' Sub Bass (Bourdon) 16' Quintaton 16' Gamba 10-2/3' Gross Quint =3DA0 8' Octave =3DA0 8' Flute Bass =3DA0 8'=3DA0 Gamba 5-1/3' Quint =3DA0 4'=3DA0 Super Octave =3DA0 4'=3DA0 Octave Gamba 16' Trombone =3DA0 8'=3DA0 Posaune =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Great to Pedal 8', 4' =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Four divisional pistons to Swell, Great, & Pedal Four pedal General pistons Swell, Great expression pedals Crescendo pedal acting on all stops and couplers       Lew Williams       --part1_18a.1b6ed516.2c1ca63c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> <BR> Dear Listers<BR> <BR> The organ of Holy Rosary Church, Toronto, was designed by Quentin Maclean (1=3D 896-1962), a pupil of Reger (composition) &amp; Straube (organ) in the = early=3D years of the 20th century.=3DA0 Though British, he was educated mostly in = Ger=3D many, and was interned there during the First World War.=3DA0 After the = war, h=3D e served as assistant organist at Westminster Cathedral before becoming = invo=3D lved in the UK cinema organ scene from the early 1920s until 1939, when he = e=3D migrated to Canada. He broadcast continually on the CBC, in both classical = a=3D nd popular idioms, until his death on July 9, 1962, in addition to his = dutie=3D s as organist/choirmaster at Holy Rosary Church.<BR> <BR> The instrument was built by Casavant in 1949 to a specification prepared = by=3D20=3D Quentin Maclean in consultation with Stephen Stoot.=3DA0 Mr. Maclean's = descrip=3D tion of the organ is as follows:=3DA0 <BR> <BR> "This organ is an attempt to combine some of the best features of the = 'baroq=3D ue' and 'romantic' schools of organ design in an instrument of quite = modest=3D20=3D dimensions.=3DA0 Each manual division provides a complete and independent = flue=3D ensemble, approximately equal in power but well-contrasted in tone = quality,=3D similar to the 'Hauptwerk' and 'Oberwerk' of the organs of the Bach = period.=3D <BR> <BR> "Both the Great and Swell sections are under expression, there being no = fewe=3D r than 64 shutters on the Swell side.=3DA0 The Pedal division is = unenclosed, c=3D onsisting of Bourdon, Gemshorn-Quint (10-2/3'), metal Octave, and = Trombone,=3D20=3D each available in unison and octave pitches; the enclosed manual doubles = are=3D also playable in this department, giving the grand total of 12 Pedal = speaki=3D ng stops, quite an innovation in a two-manual organ.<BR> <BR> "Unusual mechanical features are the provision of a tremulant to the Great = d=3D ivision and the placing of the coupler drawknobs alongside those of the = Swel=3D l, instead of over the top keyboard as usual.=3DA0 This makes for a better = bal=3D anced console layout in a small organ.<BR> <BR> "Some interesting tonal departures from the standard pattern are found in = th=3D e Schultze-type Diapason chorus; the Swell 'Trompette,' a real, fiery = French=3D specimen; the Spitzflute Celeste on the Great; and the unified Gamba on = Swe=3D ll and pedal, which serves in a threefold capacity as a bright Swell = Princip=3D al, a flue oboe and a String Bass all in one -- truly a remakable example = of=3D tonal versatility."<BR> <BR> The original 1949 specification follows. After Maclean's death, it was = radic=3D ally altered:<BR> <BR> GREAT (enclosed)<BR> 16' Quintaton<BR> 8' Open Diapason<BR> 8' Hohl Flute<BR> 8' Spitzflute<BR> 8' Flute Celeste (TC)<BR> 4' Principal<BR> 2-2/3' Twelfth<BR> 2' Fifteenth<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Tremulant<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Sub Octave <BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Unison Off <BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Octave <BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'<BR> <BR> SWELL <BR> 16' Contra Gamba<BR> 8' Horn Diapason<BR> 8' Doppelflute<BR> 8' Salicional<BR> 8' Gamba<BR> 8' Gamba Celeste<BR> 4' Octave Gamba<BR> 4' Rohrflute<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Cornet (12/15/17)<BR> 8' Trumpet<BR> 8' Vox Humana<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Tremulant<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Sub Octave<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Unison Off<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Octave<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 <BR> <BR> PEDAL<BR> 16' Sub Bass (Bourdon)<BR> 16' Quintaton<BR> 16' Gamba<BR> 10-2/3' Gross Quint<BR> =3DA0 8' Octave<BR> =3DA0 8' Flute Bass<BR> =3DA0 8'=3DA0 Gamba<BR> 5-1/3' Quint<BR> =3DA0 4'=3DA0 Super Octave<BR> =3DA0 4'=3DA0 Octave Gamba<BR> 16' Trombone<BR> =3DA0 8'=3DA0 Posaune<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Great to Pedal 8', 4'<BR> =3DA0=3DA0=3DA0 Swell to Pedal 8', 4'<BR> <BR> Four divisional pistons to Swell, Great, &amp; Pedal<BR> Four pedal General pistons<BR> Swell, Great expression pedals<BR> Crescendo pedal acting on all stops and couplers<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> Lew Williams<BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_18a.1b6ed516.2c1ca63c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: public domain organ music update From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 10:10:59 -0700   not in the USA - anything pre-1923 is fair game ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, June 14, 2003 9:10 AM Subject: public domain organ music update     > Any copyright issues here?? > > david baker > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.489 / Virus Database: 288 - Release Date: 6/10/03  
(back) Subject: Scandinavian music recordings From: "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 20:01:49 -0400   Hello folks!   I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can find some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have tried the Organ Historical Society and found very little.   SDG, Josiah Armes    
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 20:17:40 -0400   On 6/14/03 8:01 PM, "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net> wrote:   > I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can find > some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have tried > the Organ Historical Society and found very little. > Can't say a thing about Polish. But for Scandinavian, I'd write (e-mail) directly to each of the principal churches in each country. Their stuff = is often choral more than organ (compared to US, where it's organ over = choral), but I think they do their productions locally and sell them the same way, quite often.   If you want, I'll make a list of cathedral churches in Norway and Sweden, for starters. I might even try Denmark and Finland. In that same genre, surely there are recordings commercially available of the cathedral church organ in Talin, Estonia.   Do searches under "Turku" (Finland) and "Nidaros" (Norway). Oh, and, for sure, "Up(p)sala." And "Lund" (both Sweden). Also "Oscar Church," Stockholm, for a full set of Messiaen.   Assuming you've done the bins at Tower Records, HMV, and suchlike.   Alan Freed www.stlukesnyc.org (So who is Josiah?)    
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 20:26:14 -0400   At Saturday 6/14/2003 08:17 PM, you wrote: >On 6/14/03 8:01 PM, "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net> wrote: > > > I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can = find > > some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have = tried > > the Organ Historical Society and found very little. > > >Can't say a thing about Polish. But for Scandinavian, I'd write (e-mail) >directly to each of the principal churches in each country. Their stuff = is >often choral more than organ (compared to US, where it's organ over = choral), >but I think they do their productions locally and sell them the same way, >quite often. > >If you want, I'll make a list of cathedral churches in Norway and Sweden, >for starters. I might even try Denmark and Finland. In that same genre, >surely there are recordings commercially available of the cathedral = church >organ in Talin, Estonia. > >Do searches under "Turku" (Finland) and "Nidaros" (Norway). Oh, and, for >sure, "Up(p)sala." And "Lund" (both Sweden). Also "Oscar Church," >Stockholm, for a full set of Messiaen. > >Assuming you've done the bins at Tower Records, HMV, and suchlike.   Wow. That was a fast response. Thank you very much. I'll look into it straight away.     >Alan Freed www.stlukesnyc.org >(So who is Josiah?)   Josiah has played the pipe organ for a few years and is listening to a wonderful CD of some Spanish organ music. He likes to explore the organ music of different nationalites. He can also talk about himself in the third person.   SDG, Josiah    
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 19:53:07 -0500       Josiah Armes wrote:   > Hello folks! > > I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can find > some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have tried > the Organ Historical Society and found very little.   First place I'd try is the Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, and Polish Music information centers. Last time I looked, each of these = organizations had active links on the International Association of Music Information Centers, and each of the five was better than many of the others listed. (cf: <http://www.iamic.ie/>)   The label "BIS" is Swedish, and has released a number of recordings of Swedish organ music; the label Marco Polo is Danish, and has released some discs of Danish organ music. I would expect that these two labels have websites, but have never taken the time to explore this.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 20:58:49 -0400   Thank you. Your information was very helpful.   SDG, Josiah   At Saturday 6/14/2003 08:53 PM, you wrote:     >Josiah Armes wrote: > > > Hello folks! > > > > I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can = find > > some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have = tried > > the Organ Historical Society and found very little. > >First place I'd try is the Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, and = Polish >Music information centers. Last time I looked, each of these = organizations >had active links on the International Association of Music Information >Centers, and each of the five was better than many of the others listed. >(cf: <http://www.iamic.ie/>) > > The label "BIS" is Swedish, and has released a number of recordings of >Swedish organ music; the label Marco Polo is Danish, and has released = some >discs of Danish organ music. I would expect that these two labels have >websites, but have never taken the time to explore this. > >ns > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Rosary Casavanta, Toronto, 1949 From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2003 22:13:59 -0500   At 12:24 PM 6/14/03 -0400, you wrote: >The instrument was built by Casavant in 1949 to a specification prepared >by Quentin Maclean in consultation with Stephen Stoot. Mr. Maclean's >description of the organ is as follows: >... >The original 1949 specification follows. After Maclean's death, it was >radically altered:   With what I have heard of some Casavants around this era, it is possible = to get quite a nice colorful sound with lots of character from a small spec. Too bad about the alterations - would love to hear something like this unaltered.   A marvelous small Casavant from 1956 is here in Milwaukee - St. Mary Czestochowa Church (RC). Smaller than the above, and without quite as much =   gravity (no manual doubles, no 16' reed), it still sounds marvelous with only 2' sounds as the highest upperwork. Just a solid character, firm = sound with just enough bite to soar through the resonant room.   John Seboldt Milwaukee