PipeChat Digest #3766 - Sunday, June 22, 2003
 
Re: Worst Organ Spec
  by "Colin Hulme" <cwhulme@myrealbox.com>
Buffalo
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Supply and demand
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Searching for organ technician southern Texas
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Supply and demand
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Searching for organ technician southern Texas
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Supply and demand
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Supply and demand
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
IRC
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
AGO Salt Lake City 2003
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Octopods
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Estey 1924 Opus 2243
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Martin Jean & John Schwandt at Montreat (Rather Long)
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
Re: AGO Salt Lake City 2003
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
RE: Supply and demand
  by "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Worst Organ Spec From: "Colin Hulme" <cwhulme@myrealbox.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 14:14:46 +0100   I don't know if it is significant but when I glanced at the quote below I read it as "several large gins"   Colin   Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: >>I don't think "canons of good taste" apply for home organs for > our own use. > > several large grins.......... > > Ross > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Buffalo From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 08:59:57 -0500   Thanks for all who responded about churches and organs in Buffalo. Gary    
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 10:32:27 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Josiah Armes" Subject: Scandinavian music recordings > I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can find > some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have tried > the Organ Historical Society and found very little. >   It may be very tough to find, but there is a quite wonderful LP of Scandinavian Organ Music played by Marilou Kratzenstein on the Sipe 3/62 = of Luther College (Decorah, IA). As well as more common things like Gade and Olsson, it includes a very striking Tu Es Petrus by Knut Nystedt that = really sounds unlike any other piece of organ music I can think of offhand. There is also a nice Old Tune from Dalecarlia by Oskar Lindberg, and works by Torsten Nilsson, Erling Kjellsby, Kjell Karlsen, and Bengt Hambraeus.   There are also several Proprius LPs of Swedish music (and Proprius has = long been an icon among us audiophiles for its splendid sonics, including wonderful recordings of French repertoire by Torvald Toren and Kjell Johnsen). Swedish Composers Play Their Own Organ Works includes Lennart Hedwall, Torsten Sorenson, Roland Forsberg & Steffan Bjorklund; there is a 2-LP set of Erik Lundkvist playing Otto Olsson; one of works including an organ concerto by Gunno Sodersten; and more from Dalecarlia played by = Bengt Granstam on the organ at Stora Tuna.   I haven't listened to these in ages, but I remember mostly enjoying them. I'll have to put them in the listening queue...   Michael Fox      
(back) Subject: Supply and demand From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 19:44:34 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Staggering!   I just read the organ-concert listing for August when I go to Holland. In ONE WEEK, there are over 160 concerts listed.   This is a small country with about 16m people.   We have 3 X more people in the UK, so we would have to have 480 concerts per week to be on equal terms. We probably have less than a couple of dozen.   Translate the same to the USA, you guys would need to have about 3,000 concerts per week to keep pace.   Quite amazing.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Searching for organ technician southern Texas From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 14:21:43 -0500   Greetings:   This past weekI flew to Westlaco, Texas to play a memorial service for a family member. (The church organist was not available).   The instrument is a three manual Rogers/w/pipes (approximately 5 or 6 ranks), about 10 years old.   The instrument is in need of maintenance, mainly tuning and replacement of burned out lights on the drawknobs.   The church is concerned with the maintenance costs. The present firm charges $1800.00 per service call and $80.00 for motel charges! They send two men (one to hold keys).   If someone on the list knows of a qualified technician serving the = Harlingen area, please contact me. I will forward the information to the church.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory   p.s. Does a bill of $1800.00 + motel costs seem rather steep for a single service call? -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Re: Supply and demand From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 16:53:52 EDT   That raises some important questions:   What are organists in the Netherlands doing, or not doing, to maintain =   such a level of respect? What are organists in the Netherlands doing, or not doing, that keeps = the demand for their talent and offerings so high? What are organists in the Netherlands saying, or not saying, that = keeps succeeding generations focused on the organ? "Holland has always had a strong 'organ culture'" is not a reasonable answer. At this stage of history, all nations have had a 'strong organ = culture' at points in their past, including the United States. Why do some nations embrace the organ, while others systematically = demean it? What makes some cultures demand excellence for their organs, while others militantly seek mediocrity and compromise? How is it that in some = regions of the world, the concept of democracy in music is that of bringing everybody = up to a certain level, while in others it is the forcible search for the = lowest common denominator? What you observed in Holland is no accident; cause and effect are in = play.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Searching for organ technician southern Texas From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 17:56:24 -0500   Patricia/Thomas Gregory wrote: > Greetings:   <snip>   > The instrument is a three manual Rogers/w/pipes (approximately 5 or 6 > ranks)   <snip>   > The instrument is in need of maintenance, mainly tuning   > The church is concerned with the maintenance costs. The present firm > charges $1800.00 per service call and $80.00 for motel charges! They = send > two men (one to hold keys).   For tuning 5-6 RANKS?? That's EXTORTION!   Where are they COMING from??? I got hauled on the carpet for charging that much to tune a III/50 organ 5-1/2 hours away from the shop that would take us 4 days from the time we left the shop until we returned (including travel time) to take care of and the total cost was in that neighborhood and they BALKED and decided they were going to find someone CHEAPER!   For $1,800.00, *I'll* fly to south Texas to do Service on that organ, and I HATE flying!!! > If someone on the list knows of a qualified technician serving the = Harlingen > area, please contact me.   > p.s. Does a bill of $1800.00 + motel costs seem rather steep for a = single > service call?   For that size of instrument, it seems out-of-line. Where do they have to come from???   Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS    
(back) Subject: Re: Supply and demand From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 19:28:18 EDT     --part1_17b.1c26eea6.2c264412_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/21/2003 4:54:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > while in others it is the forcible search for the lowest > common denominator? >   perhaps, sir, it is our cultural desire for:   easy quick cheap convenient desire for every thing to be the same--music on the radio like the church sermons = that entertain overly midi (and i use it a bit)     just a passing thought   dale in Florida   --part1_17b.1c26eea6.2c264412_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated 6/21/2003 4:54:57 PM Eastern = Dayl=3D ight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"A=3D rial" LANG=3D3D"0">while in others it is the forcible search for the = lowest <B=3D R> common denominator?<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" FACE=3D3D"Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> perhaps, sir, it is our cultural desire for:<BR> <BR> easy<BR> quick<BR> cheap<BR> convenient<BR> desire for every thing to be the same--music on the radio like the = church<BR=3D > &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nb= s=3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = =3D20=3D &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = sermo=3D ns that entertain<BR> overly midi (and i use it a bit)<BR> <BR> <BR> just a passing thought<BR> <BR> dale in Florida</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17b.1c26eea6.2c264412_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Supply and demand From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2003 00:29:47 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Yes indeed!   For a start there are many very positive factors:-   1) Organs of absolute excellence from a variety of traditions and eras.   2) Artistic grants to musicians and other cultural "entertainers".   3) State support for restoration work to some of the oldest and finest organs anywhere in the world.   4) Organ cases regarded as unique works of art, with some containing old master paintings.   5) "Culture" (new and old) is actually an important area of Dutch education from schools through to colleges.   6) Fine academic minds and extremely intellectual organists, who maintain a very, very high standard of interpretation. (Nothing ever seems to be just "played"...it is interpreted).   7) The fact that town councils actually own some of the instruments, means that public support for the organ is a pre-requisite politically.   8) A fairly strong, but slightly fading church tradition which is tolerant, "in touch" with people and embraces the wider community.   9) Organist/composers who are in important academic roles.   10) Organists such as Ton Koopman who are very widely gifted scholars, performers and conductors. (Gustav Leonhardt also gained world-wide fame as a scholar, harpsichordist and conductor).   11) A deeply ingrained respect for history and tradition, from which Holland gains a great deal of revenue and respect internationally.   However, there is an "oomiboo" factor at work which cannot simply be explained by analysis.   Why is it that, at a lunch-time orgel-konzert, there are quite a number of children present?   I recall being slightly swamped by a small group of children at St-Laurent's, Rotterdam...and I was just having a play rather than performing a recital. They had come in with their (very apologetic) teacher, and were awed by the organ and the sound it made. At least 15 of them asked to see the console, and their appreciation was not childish at all.....their eyes sparkled as they watched me play, and their ears marvelled at the sounds. I was just delighted to welcome them around the console........   These were ordinary kids whom, I knew, would also enjoy street organs, street theatre, pop music and dance festivals.....they were full of the joy of life.   Perhaps the word "community" still means something in Holland, and with it comes a respect for everything which is good but perhaps different.   It's a funny thing, but when I am in Holland, I love to watch street performers such as puppeteers, jugglers, clowns, and even a solo accordian player in a doorway such as I marvelled at last year. The lad was maybe 15 and an EXPERT!   Above all, there is the feeling that people are part of a community which actually cares about them....it's a very Dutch thing, and self-expression is not only welcomed or merely tolerated, it is actively encouraged.   A community of communicators in fact!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK               --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > That raises some important questions: > > What are organists in the Netherlands doing, or > not doing, to maintain > such a level of respect?   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: IRC From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 17:54:29 -0700   I'm on, if anybody wants to chat ... it's too HOT to do any more work = here.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: AGO Salt Lake City 2003 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 20:54:14 -0500   I must highly commend the steering committee and all those who planned and organized the Regions 8 and 9 AGO convention in Salt Lake City. It was phenomenal - not only was this THE convention of the year, but it may well be the convention of the decade. Thanks so much for a job well done. I cannot say enough good things about it, and was happy I could be in attendance. I will cherish the memories and the acquaintances.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Octopods From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 21:05:29 -0500   Well if you really want one of those things, last I knew Buzard had an authentic British one in stock to sell!   I just think a single rank would be a bit limiting--though I do know a church that used an unenclosed one rank gedeckt, unified, on one manual = very successfully for a number of years. They had received many compliments = from visitors to the building, and IIRC, had many requests to use their = building for weddings, with a number mentioning their beautiful organ as a major reason.   It was up for sale solely because the sanctuary was being enlarged. It = was a Wicks, btw.   Dennis Steckley & A Six-Pack of Cats    
(back) Subject: Estey 1924 Opus 2243 From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 22:30:24 -0400   This organ had a player mechanism originally, now removed, is or was in the Keene NH Hugh De Payne Commandery, Masonic Temple.   Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Martin Jean & John Schwandt at Montreat (Rather Long) From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 23:21:09 -0400   This week, the Presbyterian Association of Musicians held its annual = conference (to be repeated next week) on Music and Worship in Montreat, North = Carolina. The conference focuses on music and liturgy. Each year, there is a = recitalist, who generally holds a master class during the week, and a service = organist, who generally hold a class in service playing.   This year, Martin Jean was the recitalist and service organist. John = Schwandt was the organist for the hymn sing. (Eric Wall, DoM and organist at First = Pres, Asheville, NC, taught the service playing class.)   I do not feel qualified to review a recital. Here is what Dr. Jean = played:   Toccata et Fuga in E, BWV 566 -- JSB Chasm (1986) -- William Albright Prelude and Variations on Old Hundredth -- Calvin Hampton -- Intermission -- The 94th Psalm -- Julius Reubke   My impression was that Dr. Jean's playing was clean and brilliant. It = didn't take long before I stopped gawking at the instrument and the playing = technique, and became totally attentive to the music.   The venue was the First United Methodist Church, in Waynesville, North = Carolina. The instrument was a 1997 Casavant (Opus 3774), with 3 manuals, 37 stops = and 50 ranks. I could not find the spec online, and did not have time to write = it down. It was an impressive looking and sounding instrument, in a live acoustic -- seat cushions only, no back cushions or carpeting.   There was a worship service each day in the conference's main hall, a = hexagonal, stone room, with large, open windows, comfortably seating the 2500 = attendees. The acoustics feel out-door-sy. The instrument was a Rodgers Trillium 967 (three manual). The service music was:   Sunday Evening Opening Voluntary: "Nocturne" from Organbook III -- William Albright (Dr. Jean did a marvelous improvisation to introduce the hymn "Lift High = the Cross", using thematic material from "Nocturne".) Closing Voluntary: Toccata and Fugue in F Major (BuxWV 157) -- Dietrich Buxtehude (The ususally respectful group was unusually chattery during the postlude. = They were all reminded Monday morning about this.)   Monday Morning Opening Voluntary: Fugue in D Major -- Max Reger Closing Voluntary: Dr. Jean improvised (brilliantly) on the opening hymn, "Gather Us In".   Tuesday Morning Opening Voluntary: (I think Dr. Jean was spared here, after the Monday recital.) Closing Voluntary: Prelude [only] in D Major (BWV 532) -- JSB   Wednesday Morning Opening Voluntary: Dr. Jean improvised -- I did not write down on what -- = I believe it was on the opening hymn, "Here, O Lord, Your Servants Gather". Closing Voluntary: Recessional -- William Mathias   Wednesday Hymn Festival [Egad! Lost my notes! Dr. Schwandt improvised with incredible skill on = several hymns. The postlude took my breath away! Alas!]   Thursday Morning Opening Voluntary: Prelude on Two American Folk Hymns [with flute] -- = Charles Callahan Closing Voluntary: Prelude on "Wareham" -- Healy Willan   Friday Morning Opening Voluntary: Festive Scherzo -- Malcolm Archer Closing Voluntary: Fanfare -- Richard Proulx   All the improvisation was very inspiring. I must venture out...   The Master Class was held at 8am each morning! Three of the students were = under 25. I'll just mention these two...   - The first student, Joe, who just turned 20, played the first movement = from Widor VI. He played the opening section on Monday, and started the more difficult section Tuesday -- no warmup or coffee, at 8am! He was really = good.   - Heather, 15, (sigh... I have a 15-year-old son), played one of the 79 = Dupre chorale preludes. She's been studying organ for 4 months, piano for 6 = years. She did well.   Last year, the Master Class was attended exclusively by those over 40 (or = nearly over 40). It was really hopefule and encouraging to see younger faces = this year.   The conference also addresses the full range of choral music -- children, = youth, and adults. There are two auditioned choirs, the Youth Chamber Choir and = the Adult Chamber Choir. The Adult Chamber Choir performs some major work, which, this year, was Morten Lauridsen's "Lux Aeterna", under the direction of = Bradley Almquist.   Handbells and brass are also represented. Bulletin blooper of the week: "Antiphonal Concert across Lake Susan. Walk out on the Lake or find a = place by the shore. Drums on the damn." Then, the next day: "The management does = not acknowledge responsibility for those who attempted to walk on Lake Susan. = For further instructions, please read Matthew 14:29-31."   Well, it's frustrating not to be able to assemble more detail about the = organ pieces and how they were played. I'm just not familiar enough with organ repertoire (I was a theatre major, after all). It was a very full week.   I trust everybody else is getting a lot out of their respective AGO = Regionals.   This has turned into our annual family vacation, because there's something = for everybody.   Mark Koontz      
(back) Subject: Re: AGO Salt Lake City 2003 From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 21:19:36 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>   > I must highly commend the steering committee and all those who planned > and organized the Regions 8 and 9 AGO convention in Salt Lake City. It > was phenomenal - not only was this THE convention of the year, but it > may well be the convention of the decade. Thanks so much for a job well > done. I cannot say enough good things about it, and was happy I could > be in attendance. I will cherish the memories and the acquaintances.   Friends:   As you would expect, Glenda has it exactly right. On the minus side, four days in SLC in the summer mean that you WILL hear "Come, Come Ye Saints" eight times unless you play hooky, and SLC also offered us temperatures in the mid-90s.   The plus side is overwhelming. The level of music-making was very high, = and the instruments featured are extraordinary. To have both Tom Murray AND = John Weaver at a regional makes it very special indeed -- and this one had = Joyce Jones and Todd Wilson as well. For me, the highest point was Murray's recital at the Tabernacle: an obscure Mozart fugue, the 6 Schumann canons divided into two sets of three flanking his own transcription of the Elgar Severn Suite (known in an inferior arrangement as the 2nd Sonata), and = then Berveiller's Mouvement (not listed on the program) followed by the Jongen Sonata Eroica. An unconventional program, but a surprisingly interesting one. He used the organ as effectively as you would expect, and it was a = joy to hear.   John Weaver's recital at the Cathedral of the Madeleine followed a vespers service scheduled for 45 minutes that ran an hour and 20 minutes. Even though I started getting antsy when the service ran 15 minutes over, I = could forgive the self-indulgence because the choir is simply fabulous: I doubt that you could hear better singing of chant anywhere. In the world. The accompanied parts were done by Andrew Unsworth on the Kenneth Jones 4/79 = in the rear gallery. Somehow I had been unimpressed by this organ when I = heard it in 1999, but what I heard in 2003 was glorious. Unsworth's = accompaniments were ideal -- not easy with the choir in the chancel! -- and John Weaver showed that it plays the literature very well, including a memorable Bach Passacaglia. The cathedral has lovely acoustics, and the combination of a fine organ and that nearly unbelievable choir in that setting is utterly convincing.   Among the short recitals, Heidi Alley's (Peeters Concert Piece, Jongen Cantabile, Durufle Prelude & Fugue on Alain) at the Tabernacle was memorable. Rick Elliott's Conference Center recital included Peter Sykes's transcription of Mars from Holst's Planets that was uniquely effective on that instrument that just radiates power at the bottom. (7 32's, including = a Diaphone, and two of the ranks go four notes down into the 64' octave.)   The Conference Center organ is certainly unusual. But the Conference = Center, seating over 20,000, is a seriously unusual space -- actually a bit disorienting or even alienating, as it is so grotesquely large, and its interior seems to borrow design features from Star Wars Empire sets. (The outside is understated monumental -- the Victor Emmanuel monument with plainer heroic elements and a rooftop garden and waterfall to soften the institutional edge.) I admire the work Schoenstein has been doing since = Jack Bethards took it over, but this organ and setting will take me some time = to get used to. At times during the noon recitals, the sensation was a bit = like being stopped at a light next to a pickup truck throbbing with overdone woofers, but it does have some lovely and impressive sounds. I can't = imagine how miniaturized a more conventional organ would sound in that = overwhelming and quite sound-dampened space.   The sound on the final night, with Todd Wilson playing the Jongen = Symphonie Concertante with the Orchestra at Temple Square under the direction of = Craig Jessop, was amazingly good. The orchestra is first-rate; they played that tricky piece as well as any of the ensembles that I've heard on record, and all of the solo passages were flawless. And Wilson played the solo part = with virtuosity and taste. I was frankly amazed at how good the sound was. = There must have been 15,000 or more in the audience; the orchestra must find it very hard to hear each other since there is no shell, no proscenium, = nothing above or around them except millions of cubic feet of air; there were = dozens of mikes in the orchestra, normally a prescription for disaster; and yet from my seat towards the back of the first half of the main floor (there = are two enormous balconies above), the sound was completely natural and balanced. The strings lacked some of the brilliance I'm used to hearing in = a normal concert hall, but it was still a lovely sound. A great evening.   The other highlight for me was the playing of competition winner Chelsea Chen. She played --from memory, being a John Weaver pupil! -- the Durufle opus 5 Suite on the 3/64 Lively-Fulcher at Libby Gardner Hall, and it was = a performance that would have done credit to any organist alive. She also played the Vivaldi-Bach d minor Concerto and Bach Fugue a la Gigue the = next day on the 3/65 Sipe of the Assembly Hall with great style and taste. At = 19, she may be a few years older than Felix Hell, but I would be surprised if she doesn't insipre the same kind of enthusiasm. She radiates a love for what she's doing, and she plays like a goddess.   I could and probably should mention other recitals as well, but I'm = stopping now. Believe me, it was in fact a great week.   Michael Fox    
(back) Subject: RE: Supply and demand From: "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2003 00:23:10 -0400   Sebastian,   I saw your organ on the cover of the July issue of TAO. Nice work!   Andrew Meagher   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: Saturday, June 21, 2003 4:54 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Supply and demand     That raises some important questions:   What are organists in the Netherlands doing, or not doing, to maintain such a level of respect? What are organists in the Netherlands doing, or not doing, that keeps the demand for their talent and offerings so high? What are organists in the Netherlands saying, or not saying, that = keeps succeeding generations focused on the organ? "Holland has always had a strong 'organ culture'" is not a reasonable answer. At this stage of history, all nations have had a 'strong organ culture' at points in their past, including the United States. Why do some nations embrace the organ, while others systematically demean it? What makes some cultures demand excellence for their organs, while others militantly seek mediocrity and compromise? How is it that in some regions of the world, the concept of democracy in music is that of bringing everybody up to a certain level, while in others it is the forcible search for the = lowest common denominator? What you observed in Holland is no accident; cause and effect are in play.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org