PipeChat Digest #3768 - Tuesday, June 24, 2003
 
Re: Octopods
  by "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com>
RE: Searching for organ technician southern Texas
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
RE: Oomiboo....maybe on topic, or maybe not.
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
Re: Scandinavian music recordings
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Late RE: Supply and demand
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Odd translations (was: Oomiboo)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Odd translations (was: Oomiboo)
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Searching for organ technician southern Texas
  by "Daniel Muller" <DVM5704@dcccd.edu>
live chat on IRC
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Searching for organ technician southern Texas
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Oomiboo....maybe on topic, or maybe not.
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Octopods From: "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 06:37:25 -0400   A good example of an "octopod" is Hook & Hastings opus 2575, a mortuary organ, and the basis of my residence instrument. It was 5 ranks (3 extended), EP Unit/Ventil, 73 note couplers.   Its sad history is documented at http://www.mcclellans.com/hh2575hist.htm   GREAT 8' Open Diapason (73), #1 8' Stopped Flute (73), #2 (Wooden Rohrflute - pierced stoppers) 8' Aeoline (61), #3 8' (Oboe) Gamba (73), #4 4' Flute (Ext #2) 8' Harp Chimes Harp Dampers Off GREAT 16-8-4 SWELL-GREAT 16-8-4   SWELL 8' Open Diapason, #1 8' Gedeckt (73), #2 8' Aeoline (61), #3 8' Oboe Gamba, #4 4' Flute D'Amour (Ext #2) 8' Vox Humana (61), #5 8' Harp Chimes Harp Dampers Off Tremolo SWELL 16-8-4   PEDAL 16' Bourdon (12 note Ext of #2) 8' Flute, #2 SWELL-PEDAL 8-4 GREAT-PEDAL 8-4   _________________________________________________________________ Add photos to your messages with MSN 8. Get 2 months FREE*. http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/featuredemail    
(back) Subject: RE: Searching for organ technician southern Texas From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 07:35:51 -0700   Hi all,   Just to put things in perspective...   Nevada, for example, does have significant distances between towns particularly in the remotest northeastern parts of the state. An = Episcopal priest here in Vegas is from Alabama originally and frequently referred to towns just "down the road" from where his parish in Ala. was at the = time...a distance of 8 to 13 miles.   "Down the road" in Nevada equates to an average of 85 miles...   The next BIG town from Vegas in Nevada is Reno...450 miles away.   Regards from remote Las Vegas Mark S. Towne   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: Sunday, June 22, 2003 8:16 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Searching for organ technician southern Texas     Dear Pipe Chatters: None of us has enough information to judge this situation. One gets the impression that Texas is so vast, with such great = distances between places, that it is impossible to gauge the distance traveled to = tune this little hybrid beast. Are they driving a day in each direction to get there? And if they are, is it because they are the closest available organ-type people? Are they charging a premium due to some aspect of the organ that makes it a protracted nightmare to tune? Did they send a bill that showed their hourly rates and accounts for all of the work they did? How often due they come = to work on the organ? Has the church contacted the firm's business manager? Here in New York City, there are over fourteen million people who describe themselves as organbuilders, serving a population of eight = million. Fees range wildly and freely, as does the type of service. Some are known to = give certain clients exemplary service, while neglecting others. Some people temper and through-tune the entire organ, make repairs, and file a report, while = others bang on the Oboe for an hour and send a bill. In some cases, truly fine tuners will work diligently and meticulously for an entire day, charge a = pittance, and the church doesn't pay the bill. Other institutions are accommodating, courteous, appreciative, and responsive. I'm sure this range of service = and response is somewhat the same nationwide, as it is with most service businesses. The church has the right to ask for some clarification. There are no secrets here, and nothing mysterious (they're not asking to be taught the nuances of tonally finishing orchestral reeds). The church should express their concern, and ask for an explanation, since they have a responsibility to their parishioners when it comes to spending money.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: RE: Oomiboo....maybe on topic, or maybe not. From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 07:46:15 -0700   from sunny Las Vegas...   So are the words Muggle and Muggle-born destined to be part of the vernacular, or to remain within Rowling novels?   Sorry...the heats getting to me.   On topic,   Recently I visited the website for the Concertgebouw in Haarlem and found the page for the organ. It offered a tranlation option which I took advantage of and found that it created some interesting translations.   16' Bourdon became 16'Bumblebee   8' Diapason became 8' The Main Thing   Regards from Vegas where we are less than a year from the arrival of our 53-rank von Beckerath at UNLV.   Mark S. Towne       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: Sunday, June 22, 2003 9:06 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Oomiboo....maybe on topic, or maybe not.     Hello,   Hee hee! It works every time!   The word oomiboo is actually the traditional word in the English language for what we nowadays call, "the X factor".   It is something else...something which cannot be described or explained.   It's a lovely word, and you can always guarantee that someone will ask, "What does oomiboo mean?"   The only answer is, "Sorry, I haven't a clue!"   Interestingly, the word does not appear in the Collin's English Dictionary of which I have a copy, but a friend has the full Oxford set, so perhaps I will find the origin of the word just for the giggle.   If that isn't bad enough, the word "Boffin" was used to describe technical wizards during World War II.   The great and good full Oxford Dictionary states, "Origin unknown".   I remember asking a previous partner about this, who was a squaddie in the army and, at the time, about 18.   "Ah!" He replied, "That's easy!"   Intrigued, I awaited the wisdom of a brilliant marksman who was not the most eloquent person in the world, in spite of the fact that he was a Bisley shooting champion.   "Well", he said, "In the army, if you die, they stuff you in a box".   "So?" I asked   "Clever people are called Brain Boxes", he continued.   "Right", I frowned.   "So a box is a coffin, and a brain-box is a boffin", he smiled with considerable smugness.   I wonder of the Oxford English Dictionary people know that?   Isn't language fun?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Andrew Mead <mead@eagle.ca> wrote: > Colin: I may be displaying my ignorance for all to > see by asking this, but > what on heaven and earth is an "oomiboo" factor?     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Scandinavian music recordings From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 08:17:51 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Josiah Armes" <SoliDeoGloria87@earthlink.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org>   > I am new to the list. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can find > some recordings of Scandinavian and/or Polish organ music? I have tried > the Organ Historical Society and found very little.   I see that there are several CDs of unfamiliar Swedish things -- = unfamiliar to me, anyway -- listed on eBay at the moment. A search for "Organ BIS" should bring them up -- seller is cello700, who sells lots of organ CDs.   Michael Fox    
(back) Subject: Late RE: Supply and demand From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 16:26:09 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   From my point of view: Sebastian touched a wound spot indeed. I often wondered because of what = some countries have an astounding organ culture and others never get one = despite the natural music abilities common people are gifted with, and despite the efforts of organ people who live there... even if these efforts are government supported.   Religion roots could be an answer. My colleague Jorge Sanchez said right: "Thanks to Martin Luther we got a Schutz, a Pachelbel, a Buxtehude, a = Bach". Germany and Holland raised to today's organ standards- highest standards = in the world, I venture to say. Contrasting my country which inherited spanish catholic tradition where the organ played a secondary role; since Vatican II zero role. = Organs were erected for prestige reasons, not for culture and people never were exposed to serious organ music.   Music education could be another fact. In Germany (and as Colin writes, in Holland too) organ crawls for kids are made. Music instruction starts at basic school. A High Senior from the a german school has more music = history & appreciation knowledge than a graduated professional from our conservatories. The IUDEM (Music College) started in the 1990s and got = organ instruction scarcely a month ago.   Social backgrounds have a role in this too, I think. In Germany a degreed musician (or instrument maker) earns the same respect as a physician, engeneer or attorney. Here, musicians are second rate, organists fourth = rate professionals. (Organ tech... whatssat?! :)-   Government support is always a "double-edged weapon"; it means to mix up with the ever changing politics here- otherwise you're out of business. Result: Worthful people (like Jorge Sanchez right now) leave to other countries where "joining the crew" of crooks and/or cuban-oriented = leftists is not a must and wages anyway are better than here no matter the = worldwide economy down.   All this is far too complex to be described in a chat- post. What = astounded me however was to know that in US-America (which inherited such a lot of German, Hollandish and British religion, culture and education patterns) there seems to be a downward tend in organ... at least I have to conclude that from comments on the chatlists. That makes me wonder- US has good = organ builders, no politics-culture mix up, no serious economy breakdown, and = the "electrium" is a worldwide 'rival' phenomenon... ??...   Thoughts? (sorry if *I* touched a wound spot with this, but I am interested)   Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: Odd translations (was: Oomiboo) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 16:30:00 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve     ----- Original Message ----- From: Mark & Cinda Towne <mstowne@concentric.net> (SNIP)   > Recently I visited the website for the Concertgebouw in Haarlem and fou= nd > the page for the organ. It offered a tranlation option which I took > advantage of and found that it created some interesting translations. > > 16' Bourdon became 16'Bumblebee > > 8' Diapason became 8' The Main Thing > (SNIP)   Ah, these translators! Three years ago my english wasn't far as good as today and I had to rely on a translator for my writings...   "Viola da Gamba" became "Viol of shrimp" (in spanish, "gamba" means shrim= p); "Maria Callas" became "Maria be silent" ("=A1calla!" means "shut up")- what a cruel irony regarding this particular. I roared with laughter... a= nd started to improve my English grammar snappy!!   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.          
(back) Subject: Re: Odd translations (was: Oomiboo) From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 17:32:42 -0300   Oh, the 'translators"...   I know what happens when we use that , or what happens when one is used, or when somebody uses a tool of those, or what happens when one is used, ;-) I use one to write in english.   Regards, Domitila   Andr=E9s G=FCnther wrote:   >Ah, these translators!=20 > =20 >      
(back) Subject: Searching for organ technician southern Texas From: "Daniel Muller" <DVM5704@dcccd.edu> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 19:12:51 -0500   On Sun, 22 Jun 2003, Sebastian Gluck <TubaMagna@aol.com> of New York wrot= e:   " ... One gets the impression that Texas is so vast, with such great dist= ances between places, that it is impossible to gauge the distance travele= d to tune this little hybrid beast. Are they driving a day in each direct= ion to get there? And if they are, is it because they are the closest ava= ilable organ-type people? ..." =20 As I have stated before, we have had transportation issues ever since the= Indians stole all our horses. This is how we South Texans explain ourse= lves when we go to New York and have forgotten our ostrich-skinneds and S= tetsons from Shepler's. A more modern transportation concern: If I do n= ot book with Southwest soon, I will be looking forward to stop-and-go (au= tomobile, tractor-trailer, and bus; you remember what happened to the hor= ses) traffic along the Pan-American Freeway in several places miles outsi= de any town this July 4th weekend. The distance is largely irrelevant in= such a case.   As with all goods and services, it is smart to shop around, but on my lis= t I would include Mr. (Jack?) Ballard in San Antonio, who could have a th= ree or three-and-a-half-hour drive to the Valley (not along the Pan-Ameri= can Freeway). I am sure that there are many other qualified technicians = -- perhaps members of the list can contribute more names on or off list -= - but if there is any interest I can at least provide a reference or two = for first-hand information about Mr. Ballard's work off list.   " ... The church has the right to ask for some clarification. There are = no secrets here, and nothing mysterious (they're not asking to be taught = the nuances of tonally finishing orchestral reeds). The church should exp= ress their concern, and ask for an explanation, since they have a respons= ibility to their parishioners when it comes to spending money."   Sensible advice, as always.   Daniel Muller Originally from the city of Saint Anthony      
(back) Subject: live chat on IRC From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 17:28:00 -0700   Commences at 9 p.m. US Eastern Standard Time TONIGHT.   If you don't know how to get there, go to   http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   and follow Ad's simple step-by-step directions.   HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for organ technician southern Texas From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 23:01:30 EDT   Hi Chatters:   I've been following this thread in the background for several days. Organ tech's charge for travel to and from the site. If they have bonding and insurance, which is a nice thing to have, it costs big bucks. An emergency visit can be expensive both for the tech's as well as for the church. Most tech's in CA get $62.50 per hr. They charge from home to the site and back again plus the time on site. I think that ought to be taken into consideration. There are no pat answers to this if one wants to stay in business and pay bills, or go out of business doing good and not be able to pay bills.     Having said this, a regular visit is combined with several visits in the area, thus reducing the cost to each church on a regular three or four visit basis. An emergency visit takes an organ tech away from local commitments and are expensive.   Tuning on these old Rodgers installations can be a nightmare if there is no heat sensor to keep the electronics and pipes together. The part costs about $100. bucks to make this happen. Then tuning can proceed like any pipe organ. Rodgers tuning control knobs are accurate for only a moment or two as there is a drift of pipes to electronic components all the time. You are lucky to get 12 notes accurately tuned on pipes, then you have to tune in octaves from there. Stretch tuning on the electronics makes matters worse. I think we ought to consider these things before we condemn large bills to churches.   Some of these hybred installations are absurdly bad with pipes not voiced for the room, anomolies of speech, pipes in the open, and lack of blend from one system to the other.   I rest my case!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Oomiboo....maybe on topic, or maybe not. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2003 07:45:41 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Shouldn't that be a 53 row baker's hearth?   :)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Mark & Cinda Towne <mstowne@concentric.net> wrote: > from sunny Las Vegas...   > Recently I visited the website for the Concertgebouw > in Haarlem and found > the page for the organ. It offered a tranlation > option...... > 16' Bourdon became 16'Bumblebee ....... we are less than a year > from the arrival of our > 53-rank von Beckerath at UNLV.     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/