PipeChat Digest #3772 - Saturday, June 28, 2003
 
St Paul's Cathedral London
  by "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk>
RE: St Paul's Cathedral London
  by "Mark Turnbull" <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk>
RE: St Paul's Cathedral London
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
IRC Reminder
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
VERY LONG:  Salt Lake City AGO Convention, chapter 1
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
I'm OK
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
OHS Opening Night - Erik Suter - 2003
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: St Paul's Cathedral London From: "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 10:16:53 +0100   Dear List Members,   I want to bring to your attention a matter of urgency at St Paul's = Cathedral in London.   The Dean and Chapter have stated, that no member of the congregation may = sit in the quire during services, as from July of this year.   For those of you who do not know St Paul's let me tell you that the = building is difficult for sound. This puts the problem lightly. There is little = point in being in St Paul's for a service if the congregation is in the Nave, whilst the choir is by itself in the quire.   Could I suggest that it might be helpful if the Dean and Chapter received letters/emails from you abroad, suggesting to them that they think again. = I am sure that those of you who have attended St Paul's and therefore understand the problem will wish to help us reverse the decision.   It must also be said that few of the Canons actually attend Evensong = during the week. The Dean only attends during Advent and Lent or when he has to = for other reasons. It should also be said that the Dean is not musical. He probably doesn't realise the problem the ruling has for musicians.   The web pages of ST Paul's can be found below.   http://www.stpauls.co.uk/rindex.htm   I do hope that some of you will write.   Alan Taylor London            
(back) Subject: RE: St Paul's Cathedral London From: "Mark Turnbull" <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 10:42:00 +0100   Alan. This is an absolutely bizar turn of events. Have you told the local media? I am sure they would be interested in running with this on bbc london radio and tv, and also in the papers. Good luck, And I will certainly write. Mark turnbull   -----Original Message----- From: alantaylor [mailto:alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk]=20 Sent: 27 June 2003 10:17 To: PipeChat Subject: St Paul's Cathedral London     Dear List Members,   I want to bring to your attention a matter of urgency at St Paul's Cathedral in London.   The Dean and Chapter have stated, that no member of the congregation may sit in the quire during services, as from July of this year.   For those of you who do not know St Paul's let me tell you that the building is difficult for sound. This puts the problem lightly. There is little point in being in St Paul's for a service if the congregation is in the Nave, whilst the choir is by itself in the quire.   Could I suggest that it might be helpful if the Dean and Chapter received letters/emails from you abroad, suggesting to them that they think again. I am sure that those of you who have attended St Paul's and therefore understand the problem will wish to help us reverse the decision.   It must also be said that few of the Canons actually attend Evensong during the week. The Dean only attends during Advent and Lent or when he has to for other reasons. It should also be said that the Dean is not musical. He probably doesn't realise the problem the ruling has for musicians.   The web pages of ST Paul's can be found below.   http://www.stpauls.co.uk/rindex.htm   I do hope that some of you will write.   Alan Taylor London             "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       BBCi at http://www.bbc.co.uk/   This e-mail (and any attachments) is confidential and may contain=20 personal views which are not the views of the BBC unless specifically=20 stated. If you have received it in error, please delete it from your system, do=20 not use, copy or disclose the information in any way nor act in=20 reliance on it and notify the sender immediately. Please note that the=20 BBC monitors e-mails sent or received. Further communication will=20 signify your consent to this.    
(back) Subject: RE: St Paul's Cathedral London From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 17:35:53 +0100   I haven't heard anything about this yet, but I wonder whether it might be a temporary arrangement. At the moment St Paul's is undergoing millions of pounds worth of internal restoration - those of you who have seen it on the tv recently might have seen large covered scaffolding towers in the central area under the dome while they work in that area. I'm wondering if it won't actually be POSSIBLE to sit in the Quire because of restoration?   Steve Canterbury, UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of alantaylor Sent: 27 June 2003 10:17 To: PipeChat Subject: St Paul's Cathedral London   Dear List Members,   I want to bring to your attention a matter of urgency at St Paul's Cathedral in London.   The Dean and Chapter have stated, that no member of the congregation may sit in the quire during services, as from July of this year.   For those of you who do not know St Paul's let me tell you that the building is difficult for sound. This puts the problem lightly. There is little point in being in St Paul's for a service if the congregation is in the Nave, whilst the choir is by itself in the quire.   Could I suggest that it might be helpful if the Dean and Chapter received letters/emails from you abroad, suggesting to them that they think again. I am sure that those of you who have attended St Paul's and therefore understand the problem will wish to help us reverse the decision.   It must also be said that few of the Canons actually attend Evensong during the week. The Dean only attends during Advent and Lent or when he has to for other reasons. It should also be said that the Dean is not musical. He probably doesn't realise the problem the ruling has for musicians.   The web pages of ST Paul's can be found below.   http://www.stpauls.co.uk/rindex.htm   I do hope that some of you will write.   Alan Taylor London             "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: IRC Reminder From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 17:44:11 -0500   Just a quick reminder that the regularly schedule PipeChat IRC session will take place TONIGHT beginning at 9:00 PM EASTERN time.   If you need information about how to join in, please go to http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   See you there!   David  
(back) Subject: VERY LONG: Salt Lake City AGO Convention, chapter 1 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 20:34:41 -0500   AN AMATEUR'S ORGAN PILGRIMAGE TO GOD'S COUNTRY   Chapter 1 - Saturday and Sunday, June 14-15   Having a taste of Salt Lake City left imprinted on my mind from the previous western vacation, I resolved to return for the Regions 8 and 9 AGO Convention there held June 16 - 19. I asked a fellow organist, Cynthia Campbell, to accompany me, and we flew out of Dothan, Alabama, on Saturday, June 14. However, just as we were about to taxi down the runway, Atlanta ATC grounded the plane for an hour. As a result, we missed our connecting flight and had to wait a couple hours to make it to Salt Lake Saturday evening, too late and too tired to do much in the line of sightseeing.   Sunday morning dawned bright and clear, and we made it through the recently planted colorful flower beds of Temple Square to the LDS Conference Center (instead of the Tabernacle) for the dress rehearsal and broadcast of the Sunday "Music and the Spoken Word". We obtained front row center seats in order to gaze adoringly upon Richard Elliott at the Schoenstein organ (V/130, 2001) as the MoTabs did their thing in honor of Father's Day in the cavernous room that holds 21,000+. I will skip listing the program now, because they did it plus a few other selections for the grand gala concert on Thursday night.   I must say it was a slick and smooth broadcast (really neat to see the camera crew in action), and the choir and boy soloist (named Phineas Bynam, from the Madeleine choir school) doing Leonard Bernstein's Chichester Psalms could not have performed better, particularly the last movement, which was spine-chilling. The entire event was thrilling.   From there we walked four blocks to St. Mark's Cathedral (Episcopal), housing a 1967 Holtkamp (III/44) in the back gallery. Just left of the altar area stood a small chamber organ, a 1854 Mirrlees (I/4) of Scotland, restored by M. L. Bigelow and Co., Utah. We thought of going to the Madeleine for the principal service, but decided that because we were to see it at least twice and St. Mark's only once, and because we wanted to receive communion, we'd revert to our Episcopal calling for the day. Sitting about a third of the way back from the altar on the left, I must tell you that the service (both music and sermon) was somewhat disappointing to both of us. If the Franck "Grand Choeur #1" was played as a prelude, we missed it - there was a tiny tuba-heavy brass ensemble playing little ditties for about fifteen minutes after the service was to start. Their new choirmaster has only been installed about a year, and was personable and well-spoken. However, the entire service seemed disjointed and willy-nilly, even with the bishop present and everyone on their best behavior. No one knew where to process or stand or from which door to leave after communion, and the choir sang standing around the organ as if it was a sing-along at the family reunion - it made me feel better about the services at St. A's. The female bishop held forth on the Trinity for several minutes without saying anything of moment. Several convention-goers/organists were present - you can always tell by the number of people standing or sitting listening to the postlude!   As we were leaving church, a woman asked us to snap a picture of a group - it was a confirmation Sunday. Cynthia asked her about good lunch spots, and she recommended one. We headed on our merry way, and a few minutes later the woman pulled up in a new Tahoe or Suburban and asked if we wanted a ride. So we ended up eating a pleasant lunch with complete strangers, a group of hospital systems analysts. They even dropped us off at our hotel.   We attended the 2:00 Tabernacle recital (do I really have to say it? we know this as well as the year 1492 - Aeolian-Skinner/Schoenstein V/206, 1948), played by James Drake, head of the organ department at Utah State University. His program:   Regina pacis, from Symphony No. 1 - Guy Weitz Cantilena - Franklin D. Ashdown Arr. of hymn Come, come, ye saints Arr. of an old melody: Amazing grace - Lynn Petersen St. Francis walking on the water - Franz Liszt/Max Reger   The performer's arrangement of "Come, come, ye saints" and an arrangement of an old melody are required repertoire for the 30-minute recitals given at the Tabernacle/Conference Center. During this week of convention the "old melodies" were all commissioned works and published in case anyone decided they were worth hearing again. We later learned that only Mormons can play the noon/afternoon recitals, and there is a complicated process through which one must maneuver in order to audition to play one of these 30-minute daily recitals. There are three male full-time organists and two part-time female organists on staff who play most of the recitals.   We sat center of the room floor level to judge the acoustics. I had never heard the Weitz or the Reger before, and found them interesting music. I am becoming quite fond of pre- and post-freight train music. I was told that because Drake studied with Weitz he is fond of performing Weitz' music. However, the reverberation from the Tabernacle organ was at times so strong as to make the effect muddy. But I love this organ - who wouldn't? If nothing else, the light show makes it all worthwhile. I would kill for that many stops to choose from and that historic soundfall.   We chose to attend Vespers at the Cathedral of the Madeleine that afternoon - how the mere 10-voice choir present that night could sound so good is a mystery. I also loved that the service was planned with lots of congregational participation in the service music.   Before this trip I had a short list of four organists I would travel to hear at any organ in any acoustic: Olivier Latry, Todd Wilson, Felix Hell, and Peter Conte. However, as the week progressed I quickly realized that I would probably need to amend this list to add some names.   Following the service was a recital at the Kenneth Jones (IV/79, 1992) mechanical action organ (again in the back gallery) by a young organ college student named Eric Gundersen, who did a superb job as an up-and-coming artist. His program:   Allegro, from Symphony No. 6 - Widor Fileuse, from Suite Bretonne - Dupre When thou art near - Bach Allegro assai, from Sonata on the 94th Psalm - Reubke   We sat on the right in the front third of the church this time. The Widor was done as well as I'd ever heard it, and I really have a soft place in my heart for Kenneth Jones anyway. The church was a truly magical space, swathed in gold, teal, and mauve much like St. Michael's in New York City, but even more beautiful. The organ was characteristic of other Jones' organs I have heard, crisp and clear. The acoustic and organ blended perfectly. The Reubke was done well, except for a couple measures near the beginning which just did not hang well, although he played all the right notes. Gundersen and his Reubke were one of the subjects for Tom Murray's master class later in the week, which I will discuss later.   After dinner (was it at the hotel? Sadly I did not make note of where we ate, even though it was not easy to find good feeding troughs in SLC on a Sunday), I made it downstairs to meet with list member Bill Hesterman, who was already exhausted from organizing the exhibit halls. David Koehne and Steve Lawson turned up, and we sat and chatted in the lobby for a while. I made it to bed around midnight after sending a few postcards.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: I'm OK From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 20:39:31 -0700   I wasn't on pipechat tonight because I had Evensong. Thanks, everybody, for checking!   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: OHS Opening Night - Erik Suter - 2003 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2003 03:16:31 -0400   ERIK SUTER, GRAND OPENING OF THE 2003 OHS CONVENTION   It was a long week, sometimes a grueling week, but without question, a = week of many happy surprises, Organs, Organ Music, and Organists. And let me = not forget the opportunity to meet old friends, and to make new ones. There is nothing quite like an OHS convention, and I will attempt to report on it accurately and with balance. As always, I will welcome comments, corrections, and additions. Many list readers have been helpful in years past, and will, I hope, continue to be so.   Mr. Suter holds degrees from Oberlin and Yale, and is Organist and = Associate Choirmaster at Washington National Cathedral. He played for us in St. Paul the Apostle R. C. Church in Annville, Pennsylvania, a young building in which Organ music looked to be contra-indicated, partly thanks to heavy carpeting widely applied! However, as we have often discussed on the = lists, the early 20th Century builders knew about building effectively for bad acoustics, and the 1902 E. W. Lane tracker Organ proved a gentle but projecting instrument. The wind was pleasantly relaxed. The console is at the left side, a reverse of the Dobson instrument at University of = Delaware that some readers may have seen. The instrument was restored by R. J. Brunner & Company in 2002.   The program began with <Placare Christe Servulis> from <Le Tombeau de Titelouze> of Dupre. Then followed probably the best performance of the Brahms Prelude & Fugue in G Minor I have heard, permitting it to be = Romantic (this is Brahms, after all) rather than a pretend Baroque P&F. There was a sure forward movement, with a lovely flexibility. More Brahms followed: Two of the Choral Preludes of Opus 122. The first, = <Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen> with a gentle "give." The next, <Schmueke dich," on a single, beautiful Flute.   The Hymn, Schmuecke Dich (of course) was wonderful, both by us, the Organ, and Organist. We were given instructions to sing only the middle stanza in harmony, a sad restriction to such beautiful harmonic writing. I sat next = to Bruce Cornely, (without the Beagles!) I had specially requested that he bring the three of them so they could sing "Lift thine eyes" of = Mendelssohn, together. One can't have everything. Anyway, I discovered that Bruce has a most wonderful ability to sing Alto, and despite direction to the = contrary, he sang every stanza in harmony. I commend him for that, as there appeared to be no particular reason for this restriction. A little mutiny in the = name of harmony can be justified. Bruce is leading a Hymn Sing later in the = week (without Choral Preludes), and I look forward to that very much.   Mendelssohn Sonata 4 is perhaps not as widely played as others, for some reason. The Allegro was strong and assured. The Andante suffered only a little bit from working with a Pedal department consisting of only one = 16' Bourdon, swamping this gentle movement, but one adjusted to it. The Allegretto was beautifully sung by the blessed Oboe. The final Allegro was taken at a rather quick clip, but no note of small value lost its dignity, and the "Rumble Strips" were rendered quite clearly. After Intermission, the Craig Phillips "Torah Song," I think a very fine piece, toying with dissonances and clusters in a completely intelligible way. There is a fine toccata at the end, and all beautifully and cleanly done.   Then, from Book 1 of Gospel Preludes by William Bolcom, "Just as I am," = and "What a friend we have in Jesus." "Just as I am" is such a gentle piece, = and on this lovely and gentle instrument, it received from Eric a wonderfully clear and, well, gentle performance. Every detail was made evident, and in the writing, the tune, which we all know, is made abundantly clear. Great piece, lovely performance! The last time I recall enjoying this so much = was in David Craighead's performance in Woolsey Hall a few years ago. Is that not a sufficient compliment? Ditto to "What a friend we have in Jesus."   This was followed, in a stylistic leap, by the Durufle Prelude on the Epiphany Introit, translated because I cannot bear to omit the = diacriticals for the sake of the Internet. Here, the Swell Trumpet showed itself off beautifully.   From the Sixth Symphony of Widor, we heard the Adagio and Final. The Swell Celeste and its operator did beautiful things for the first, beautiful movement. The Final somehow did not come off. It was played in a somewhat clipped manner, without the "gravitas" it so wanted. This old (1902) E. W. Lane instrument of 19 stops really does wonderfully well in this quite dry acoustic, but a genuine Cavaille-Coll it is not, and a sort of heavier, = more sustained, compensatory approach might have made this bit of the Master of the Cavaille-Coll work better. All that notwithstanding, this was a wonderful recital, and a perfect opening to the beckoning of yet another splendid OHS Convention!   Next year in Buffalo!   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com