PipeChat Digest #3510 - Sunday, March 2, 2003
 
Business trips and organs, Part 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@scti.net>
Re: Felix at the ACCHOS 7 manual console
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@ptd.net>
LONG RE: The Churches and Young People
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Paris
  by "Chapman Gonz=E1lez" <chapmanp@comcast.net>
Re: Paris
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: "sehr-expressive" and double boxes
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Business trips and organs, Part 2
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: "sehr-expressive" and double boxes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Business trips and organs, Part 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@scti.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2003 07:10:29 -0600   Back to ambassadors and other irrelevancies:   Alan had provided excellent driving directions to the college and back to my hotel, and there is where the pleasantness of the trip itself ended. I spent the next two days recalling my very interesting couple of hours at Rollins while embedded in the excruciating detail of a government program evolving into another bureaucracy. By the first break after the first session, I was looking for something more interesting to round out my visit. I called directory assistance and got the telephone number for Bruce Cornely in Gainesville, to see if he would have a few minutes for lunch on my way home Friday.   Thursday afternoon, girded with all sorts of directions, I made my way to Kissimmee to the Osceola County Courthouse to review a model dependency court in progress. However, the directions were wrong, and it took me an extra thirty minutes and two stops to ascertain the location of court. But that was the beginning of my troubles. I had made arrangements for dinner at the new home of my law school roommate, her attorney husband and 7-year old daughter whom I had never met. The directions sent me for their home in Windemere were also bogus. Vineland Drive/Road does not exist for mere tourists, and I-4 did not list any of the road names or numbers given me for the appropriate exit. What should have taken 30-40 minutes was a 2-hour ordeal. Even their directions in the swank housing development were wrong, and I wandered through a gated community of million-dollar homes for some time before finding them. I finally arrived and had an enchanting time with them and their daughter before much more easily finding my way back to the hotel.   The next morning temperatures in Orlando had dropped to the 20s (Rick had informed me that it was 14 degrees on our front porch back home at 7:00 am CT, and we lost power about 4:00 that morning). I eagerly anticipated my trip home, and met Bruce at a tire place in Gainesville where I had stopped to repair my now injured spare. We visited his church, First Baptist, where I had visited before. The church is home to one of the most charming 3-manual Casavants I have ever heard. The 1975 installation of forty-odd ranks is perfectly matched to the room and the denomination, with many sweet, crisp sounds making it worthy of a wide repertoire. A sure aid in its projection of sound is the bilateral symmetry of the placement of the pipes, on either side of the baptistry, angled outward and visible in an eye-pleasing manner.   After our time there Bruce suggested we drop by next door to see if the organist at First Presbyterian was "at home" and would show us the new Fisk instrument. While walking there in the crisp 30-degree weather, he told me that the church organist would not even show the organ to a fellow list-member down from West Point the day before, even though he stated he was about to practice. While I had no great hopes of an impromptu meeting, and had not even entertained the thought of playing or hearing the new Fisk during this trip, I was somewhat nonplussed by the organist's curt response sent by the embarrassed church secretary, who tried as best she could to sugar coat the message that he was in a meeting and didn't know how many more hours he would be detained; if we wanted to wait, he might find time for us if he wasn't too busy. This was the lunch hour, and so far I've not met any organists who work so hard that they must meet through meal times on Fridays (in fact, while momentarily on my soap-box I'll go so far as to pull a Bob Graham and trade places with any organist for a week so that he/she can experience what "busy" is for a lawyer. Sorry about that outburst - I went to the Bahamas for a moment). She looked very shame-faced as she added that no one could see the organ or the sanctuary without him, a new policy instituted by him. I thanked her and told her nothing ventured, nothing lost: I was not as important as the organist from West Point that visited the day before and was denied. I am, after all, only a humble attorney.   I was not surprised that I was unable to play or hear the organ at an impromptu visit, but this was the first occasion I was not allowed in a church to see it and the organ casing or setting. This was the same organist who Bruce previously related played a wedding at Bruce's church, did not call ahead to arrange a practice, and changed all the pistons.   Bruce and I had a very nice lunch at some place called Ivy's Garden (I believe), and all too soon I bade Bruce farewell and headed out. One block from I-75 my "check engine" light came on, so I called the local Honda dealership and pleaded for directions and for someone to take a look at the car. Although the service department was swamped with Friday appointments and I had to wait an hour, the personnel graciously worked me in, gave me a satisfactory explanation and assurances that I could make it home safely, and cleared the car's computer.   I resolved to make no more stops, all of which seemed to engender trouble, but had to break that promise in Marianna to take on more fuel. I arrived home exhausted but happy around 6:30 pm to the loving embrace of husband and kitties.   On the way home I ruminated about the myriad of differences in people, particularly in the organ profession. Who was the real ambassador for the organ? The celebrity that I had no hope of meeting and no intention of inconveniencing was the one who called me and gave graciously of his time and talent. The person I had never met or heard of was too busy, which may be so, and I had no reason to be miffed when I had made no arrangements beforehand. However, to have a policy to ban people from the church without his permission and presence when he is so busy pretty much ensures that only the most persistent and stalwart will ever seek out the organ or him. I do not mean to spark some debate here; I am just commenting in my usual stream-of-consciousness fashion.   Ah, sweet mysteries of life!   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Felix at the ACCHOS 7 manual console From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@ptd.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2003 11:07:02 -0500     All:   Notice how easily Felix is "playing" on the seventh manual !! A tribute = to the ergonomic design of the console. The five five manual console is very ergonomic as well. The traditional = look of a console with five manuals in "steps" may look aesthetic but is hard to play on the fifth manual.   Antoni    
(back) Subject: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2003 15:24:24 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Folks-   Thanks to TommyLee for forwarding this; I will pass it to my acquientances between clergymen and pastors. Thanks for all who gave their opinions. This thread is not "Religion" only, it's important for all of us who work = in the church related professions organ playing/building/repairing- I don't want the term "business" in this relation, but regretfully it *is* our business since we have to do a living from it.   I live in a Country where the backgrounds could be different from Europe = or USA, but the problem we face is the same. For this, I will post a chapter = of Venezuelan Church Music history that has to do directly with this problem. You may skip it if you want however and go directly to YOUTH CHURCH ABSENTISM IN VENEZUELA below where I enumber the experiences we made and some thoughts.   Of course all this material is mostly seen from the point of view of a church musician, organist and pipe organ technician- what else :)   Food for thought... here it goes. =3D=3D=3D=3D HISTORY BACKGROUNDS: From 16th cty to 1825 the Spanish Catholic Church, which was considered a bastion against the raising protestantism in Europe, ruled with iron hand = in Venezuela. Music activities were subjected to strict rules in and outside the church.   In the 1770s Father Pedro Palacios y Sojo founded the Nerist Oratory in Caracas, which housed the first native music academy. The young men that conformed the group were strong influenced by the "Mannheimer Stil" and composed many religious works that were purchased by and performed at the Caracas Cathedral.   The Independence War refrained this flourishing movement. After 1825 the Church began to lose influence in music activities because of the = liberalism of the new leaders. In 1870 under the dictatorship of Grl. Guzman Blanco church and State were divided. Many churches and Convents were secularized and demolished. As a Paradox the remaining churches were modernized (in neoclassical style) and valuable organs were imported- mostly Cavaille-Colls, Stoltz Freres and a Harrison & Harrison. But church music languished, while profane music, mostly Opera and Musique de salon were a la mode.   At turn of the century church authorities adopted the european Church = Reform Movement (Solesmes, St Caecilia Society, Albert Schweitzer...)- but = without having in account that this movement called for a professional level that didn't exist in Venezuela, where the Filharmonic Societies and Music Academies were barely at pioneer status.   In the 1920s a young understanding pedagogue and church musician, Juan Bautista Plaza, finally adapted the Reform to venezuelan standards and succeeded partially- but only partially because the Cathedral Chapter in Caracas and some high standing clergymen were stubborn, arrogant and = stingy, and Mr Plaza couldn't achieve all his goals, for example, to get a modern, valuable organ for the Cathedral. His pupils and colleagues, who saw this continuouos and useless fights of = Mr Plaza didn't feel encouraged to engage themselves as church musicians- hencefore, they didn't go to church with regularity either.   In the 1940s dramatic changes in culture and society happened because of = the adoption of "American Way of Life" as consequence of the Oil Boom, and the influence of thousands of european immigrants who came in. Protestantism gained more and more influence in a country that had remained 100% = catholic up to the date. In 1948 Mr. Plaza resigned and in the 1950s church music langished again, despite the efforts of musicians like Vicente Emilio Sojo and his pupil, organist Evencio Castellanos. The Dictatorship of Marcos Perez Jimenez, = who was against the church, didn't help either. Protestantism gained more influence- and their music tradition was much better, participative and solid. In 1958 Venezuela became a democracy after 120 years of military dictatorship.   After 1963 2nd Vatican Council policies did the rest to the languishing Church Music and Organ developement. Statements like "praise the Lord with guitars, electronic devices and even records" and "let the Organ with all this flues and stops to the angels, and bring in humble folcloristic instruments that could be managed by common people to praise the Lord" brought in a rampant liberalism. Masses were invaded by screaming youths with electric guitars and Rock percussion equipments (these screamimg = youths are now 50+ years old!). If Mr Plaza had some trouble to improve church music forty years before, this task became impossible now. The Chapel Masters and Organists refused plainly to accept the "new wawe" and = resigned or were fired. Mr Evencio Castellanos, for example, resigned from his = Chapel Master position in the Caracas Cathedral out of protest. All pipe organs were abandoned and substituted by other instruments. An exception was the German Lutheran Community in Caracas, which started a neo-barroque oriented music movement in 1960 and brought in german and canadian organists for recitals. These recitals only were given at the neobarroque styled Kleuker organs in the German Lutheran Churches of = Caracas and Valencia however, because the organs in the catholic churches were in bad condition and some clergymen refused plainly to allow recitals = alledging that "churches are not concert halls". Academic music was definitely out = of the catholic church.   In 1967 the Church, alarmed by the rampant and indiscriminate break-in of Rock, Jazz and Yeah-Yeah styled music in Masses and Worships and the still increasing influence of the protestantism (which kept a solid and high quality music tradition that attracted the youths of this time) ordered a feedback to academic, serious style of the liturgical music. For this a comission was founded. But the members of the commision were conservative, academic oriented men who set far too high standards and tried to reset = the church music to pre-conciliar level, which of course was impossible to achieve. A timid effort by academic composers to write lighter, native styled liturgical music with some academic level failed completely- it wasn't accepted by the worshippers who preferred brief, easy chants, and = the composers devoted themselves to more productive tasks. After almost four centuries, the Church in Venezuela had lost its status = as culture promoter and carrier, and with that its attraction to almost all people with solid music tastes or interests.   The traditional Chapel Master-Schola-Organist ensemble was substituted by good willed musicians, many of them amateurs, who sit at the organ (mostly electrium) and sing the mass chants acompaining themselves on the instrument. The most important 2nd VC policy: to integrate the = congregation to music by "participative singing" (alike in protestant churches) is difficult to achieve because in Venezuela there is no public singing tradition, and people until recent went to mass to sit down and have an edifying experience without having to "work". The grudgy statement of a parishoner: "What- me singing?! That's the task of the parish and the organist, that's I am paying for!" was a typical example. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D YOUTH CHURCH ABSENTISM IN VENEZUELA: FACTS AND EXPERIENCES   Church absentism by the youth increased in the 1970s and 1980s in *all, catholic and protestant* churches for several reasons.   At first, liturgy became a routine and didn't attract youth anymore.   At second, Church and State have a strict division in Venezuela. Further = on, in my country (and all south America!) it's life dangerous to talk "coram publico" about certain topics. If a Preacher, Pastor, Parish, or Clergyman discuss actual themes like social (mis)situation that could interest young people they immediately get a scold "from above" and the strict = instruction to "not mix into politics"- they *have* to preach "allround wishiwashi", like it or not. Understanding or not understanding this background, young people don't feel approached and stay away.   Third, the music. Until the 1960s youths were attracted by academic music, but this began to fade. Young people didn't feel approached anymore and rebelled against the "*must* go to worship on sunday". This had a coincidence with the worldwide youth rebellion of the 1960s and 1970s. The anguished clergymen encouraged "Youth Masses" with new liturgic ideas and music which were leaded by youth groups- without music training background, however. Result: The youth absentism continued ("we hear much better music of this ilk in the Disco", they said) and the older parishioners refused to come to this "cheap spectacle"- the traditional churches emptied. The parishes then started to hire their organists to conform a schola and give some training to the young people, and to introduce new styled repertoire. The professional organists however attempted a too academic, disciplined level- the young people went away. The amateur organists couldn't accomplish the task, and the youth groups became a disaster and dissolved. The chants repertoire and liturgy renewal was rejected plainly by conservative congregation members, who threaded to retire their contributions "if this torture goes on". Since our churches live from voluntary contributions and the conservative members usually have the = money, the repertoire renovation plans were swiftly dismissed, and churches = remain empty (according to 1984 statistics only 4% of the population goes to church).   In the last ten years the lutheran and presbyterian churches made a compromise: "Traditional" worship for the conservative members with traditional repertoire and organ music, and "Youth worship" with native = and "modern" music repertoire, with emphasis to *native* music- but not cheap folclorism like in the early sixties. The repertoire is selected by a comission of academic formed but ample minded young musicians and trained youth leaders who lead and perform liturgy and music in the worship too. = The idea succeeded and is worth to be adopted by our catholic church, but = after forty years our catholic church faces a funny phenomenon. For one side, a "comeback" of strictest traditionalism. The young clergymen are back to Perosi, Gregorian Chant and lots of Incense. This is mixed with a strict Nationalism- Access to a leading position in the church from parish = upwards is only possible to *native* venezuelans. All these tendecies could be channeled with a proper leadership, but the necessary culture for this definitely went away from the Church.   You have to know that never in history an organist in Venezuela could do a living from organ alone: they all had to work in other areas ( I made a humorous remark about this in Lighter and Irreverent History 02). This = fact is the main cause for our staggering organ and church music development. The efforts by Pablo Castellanos and Jorge Sanchez to start a modern venezuelan organ tradition in 1978 and 1995 respective never took in = account a link to the church or was intended to attract young people to church activities. Recitals have to be given in churches since the church owns = all our pipe organs. But the clergy (with a few honourable exceptions!) isn't interested at all in this and puts on so wicked restrictions to rehearsals and recital activities that none of us feels encouraged anymore to carry = on this movement.   The economic breakdown and political turmoil my country is facing right = now does the rest and spoils even the good will of all the young parishes who want to have their organs restored and put back to life by a trained organist- but how on earth they can pay proper wages to professionals who must do a living?-   To close this, a last food for thought: How manage the sects to get "full houses" and plenty of young people? Can = we adopt some of their ideas?   Yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.        
(back) Subject: Paris From: "Chapman Gonz=E1lez" <chapmanp@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2003 15:44:11 -0500   Hello Boardmembers, I have a couple of questions someone might be able to help me with. = I am going to Paris next week, and the last time I was there, we tried in vain to find the Paris Conservatoire. Does anyone have an address, directions, or whatever? Second, I've been trying to buy the "Meditation" by Durufle and it = seems to be on back order over here. Does anyone know where I might look in Paris for a good music store that could have this in stock?   Many thanks,   Chapman in Baltimore    
(back) Subject: Re: Paris From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2003 22:35:27 +0100 (CET)   website of the "Conservatoire de Paris": www.cnsmdp.fr/ (Only in French. The English site is under construction) Good luck! Hans-Friwdrich Hell     Chapman Gonz=E1lez schrieb: > Hello Boardmembers, > I have a couple of questions someone might be able to > help me with. I > am going to Paris next week, and the last time I was > there, we tried in > vain to find the Paris Conservatoire. Does anyone have > an address, > directions, or whatever?  
(back) Subject: Re: "sehr-expressive" and double boxes From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2003 17:25:37 EST   Dear Alan: You are partially correct about Temple Emanu-El. The two subsections = of the Solo Organ are in different boxes, but the Brass section does not open =   into the Main section. The10" pressure Main section (four flues, two orchestral reeds, and ten ranks of mixtures) is the expression enclosure directly in front of you when you enter the sixth floor of the instrument. =   The enclosure on your immediate right is the 13-rank 13-1/2" pressure Orchestral String Ensemble. On the south side of the Great Arch, next to = the 32' Grand Open Bass, is the Brass subsection of the Solo, four reeds on = 15" pressure (16' Bombarde Harmonique, 8' Trompette Harmonique, 8' French = Horn, and 4' Clairon Harmonique). The Tremulant only affects the Solo Main subdivision. My initial thought was to have them on separate expression shoes, and have them actually couple separately around the organ, but with five expression shoes plus a crescendo already, it would have been unwieldy. = With six shoes, we still had to fenagle the toe studs and reversibles. So the Brass section remains allied with the Main Solo, but the 25-1/2" pressure Tuba Organ, which you saw from the catwalk above the north arch spring, floats via ventils.   Seb  
(back) Subject: Re: Business trips and organs, Part 2 From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 00:34:00 +0100 (CET)   Glenda schrieb: > Back to ambassadors and other irrelevancies: > > Alan had provided excellent driving directions to the > college and back > to my hotel, and there is where the pleasantness of the > trip itself > ended. I spent the next two days recalling my very > interesting couple > of hours at Rollins while embedded in the excruciating > detail of a > government program evolving into another bureaucracy. By > the first > break after the first session, I was looking for > something more > interesting to round out my visit. I called directory > assistance and > got the telephone number for Bruce Cornely in > Gainesville, to see if he > would have a few minutes for lunch on my way home > Friday. > > Thursday afternoon, girded with all sorts of directions, > I made my way > to Kissimmee to the Osceola County Courthouse to review a > model > dependency court in progress. However, the directions > were wrong, and > it took me an extra thirty minutes and two stops to > ascertain the > location of court. But that was the beginning of my > troubles. I had > made arrangements for dinner at the new home of my law > school roommate, > her attorney husband and 7-year old daughter whom I had > never met. The > directions sent me for their home in Windemere were also > bogus. > Vineland Drive/Road does not exist for mere tourists, and > I-4 did not > list any of the road names or numbers given me for the > appropriate exit. > What should have taken 30-40 minutes was a 2-hour ordeal. > Even their > directions in the swank housing development were wrong, > and I wandered > through a gated community of million-dollar homes for > some time before > finding them. I finally arrived and had an enchanting > time with them > and their daughter before much more easily finding my way > back to the > hotel. > > The next morning temperatures in Orlando had dropped to > the 20s (Rick > had informed me that it was 14 degrees on our front porch > back home at > 7:00 am CT, and we lost power about 4:00 that morning). > I eagerly > anticipated my trip home, and met Bruce at a tire place > in Gainesville > where I had stopped to repair my now injured spare. We > visited his > church, First Baptist, where I had visited before. The > church is home > to one of the most charming 3-manual Casavants I have > ever heard. The > 1975 installation of forty-odd ranks is perfectly matched > to the room > and the denomination, with many sweet, crisp sounds > making it worthy of > a wide repertoire. A sure aid in its projection of sound > is the > bilateral symmetry of the placement of the pipes, on > either side of the > baptistry, angled outward and visible in an eye-pleasing > manner. > > After our time there Bruce suggested we drop by next door > to see if the > organist at First Presbyterian was "at home" and would > show us the new > Fisk instrument. While walking there in the crisp > 30-degree weather, he > told me that the church organist would not even show the > organ to a > fellow list-member down from West Point the day before, > even though he > stated he was about to practice. While I had no great > hopes of an > impromptu meeting, and had not even entertained the > thought of playing > or hearing the new Fisk during this trip, I was somewhat > nonplussed by > the organist's curt response sent by the embarrassed > church secretary, > who tried as best she could to sugar coat the message > that he was in a > meeting and didn't know how many more hours he would be > detained; if we > wanted to wait, he might find time for us if he wasn't > too busy. This > was the lunch hour, and so far I've not met any organists > who work so > hard that they must meet through meal times on Fridays > (in fact, while > momentarily on my soap-box I'll go so far as to pull a > Bob Graham and > trade places with any organist for a week so that he/she > can experience > what "busy" is for a lawyer. Sorry about that outburst - > I went to the > Bahamas for a moment). She looked very shame-faced as > she added that no > one could see the organ or the sanctuary without him, a > new policy > instituted by him. I thanked her and told her nothing > ventured, nothing > lost: I was not as important as the organist from West > Point that > visited the day before and was denied. I am, after all, > only a humble > attorney. > > I was not surprised that I was unable to play or hear the > organ at an > impromptu visit, but this was the first occasion I was > not allowed in a > church to see it and the organ casing or setting. This > was the same > organist who Bruce previously related played a wedding at > Bruce's > church, did not call ahead to arrange a practice, and > changed all the > pistons. > > Bruce and I had a very nice lunch at some place called > Ivy's Garden (I > believe), and all too soon I bade Bruce farewell and > headed out. One > block from I-75 my "check engine" light came on, so I > called the local > Honda dealership and pleaded for directions and for > someone to take a > look at the car. Although the service department was > swamped with > Friday appointments and I had to wait an hour, the > personnel graciously > worked me in, gave me a satisfactory explanation and > assurances that I > could make it home safely, and cleared the car's > computer. > > I resolved to make no more stops, all of which seemed to > engender > trouble, but had to break that promise in Marianna to > take on more fuel. > I arrived home exhausted but happy around 6:30 pm to the > loving embrace > of husband and kitties. > > On the way home I ruminated about the myriad of > differences in people, > particularly in the organ profession. Who was the real > ambassador for > the organ? The celebrity that I had no hope of meeting > and no intention > of inconveniencing was the one who called me and gave > graciously of his > time and talent. The person I had never met or heard of > was too busy, > which may be so, and I had no reason to be miffed when I > had made no > arrangements beforehand. However, to have a policy to > ban people from > the church without his permission and presence when he is > so busy pretty > much ensures that only the most persistent and stalwart > will ever seek > out the organ or him. I do not mean to spark some debate > here; I am > just commenting in my usual stream-of-consciousness > fashion. > > Ah, sweet mysteries of life! > > Glenda Sutton > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: "sehr-expressive" and double boxes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2003 19:25:11 -0500   On 3/2/03 5:25 PM, "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote:   > Dear Alan: > You are partially correct about Temple Emanu-El. The two subsections = of > the Solo Organ are in different boxes, but the Brass section does not = open > into the Main section.   Seb, you embarrass me to tears. I'm flattered beyond description that you should address such a reply to me--who can, yes, understand, some of it, = but of which much MORE will be understood, and far better, by other listers. Thank you!   Iggerunt,   Alan (whom you've gifted with a whole new, and undeserved, reputation) (But always: what fun to talk to you!)