PipeChat Digest #3513 - Monday, March 3, 2003
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03
  by "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Phonograph Styli
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Phono Styli
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Phono Styli
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
pastor/musician relations
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Colin Mitchell's post
  by "Kevin L. Cischke" <ophicleide160@lycos.com>
Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
RE: Organist's time pie chart
  by "Cheryl Van Ornam" <cvanornam@newtonpres.org>
Re: 6 manual organs
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03 From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 06:36:06 -0600   Stan Yoder wites, "Something else must be the cause, e.g., the record is worn from many plays, it had been played with a worn stylus, if played by = a stereo pickup the stylus may be riding the bottom of the groove, etc., = etc."   Yeah, the record is worn by many plays and has a lot of pops. etc. It = says on the jacket that it can be played with stereo equip but I did not = realize that there is a different stylus for mono. How does one know when a = stylus is worn? How do you go about getting a new stylus these days, are they interchangable? I searched on the web to see the album is still = available, it is not. Thanks for you help. Amy Fleming    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 13:44:01 +0100 (CET)   Stan Yoder wrote: > > Well, I did see a pic of the Ulm Walcker. The second > pedalboard had very short naturals and was > mounted at an angle, at the location of our swell shoes > (over a wider expanse, of course.) Where the > shoe(s) was/were I don't remember. A romantic Walcker > would have had at least one.   Where did you see that picture, and when was it taken? When I performed at the Ulm Cathedral in June 1997, there was definitely no second pedalboard.   Felix  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 08:04:17 -0500   Hi Felix und List,   Having mentioned the photograph in The Organist's Book of Days, I should = add the caption to that picture, which is clarifying.   "The organ in Stuttgart's Stiftskirche is one of five that Eberhard Friedrich Walcker is known to have built with two pedalboards. The = organist was provided with the opportunity to have two pedal registrations = available without the necessity of changing stops. This last surviving example of a two-pedalboard console was destroyed in 1944."   Stan's memory of the Ulm picture he saw (obviously of a console no longer extant) describes exactly the Stuttgart instrument in the picture. There appear to be two Swell shoes way over to the right.   Cheers,   Malcolm in-the-deep-freeze   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 03, 2003 7:44 AM Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards     > Stan Yoder wrote: > > > > Well, I did see a pic of the Ulm Walcker. The second > > pedalboard had very short naturals and was > > mounted at an angle, at the location of our swell shoes > > (over a wider expanse, of course.) Where the > > shoe(s) was/were I don't remember. A romantic Walcker > > would have had at least one. > > Where did you see that picture, and when was it taken? > When I performed at the Ulm Cathedral in June 1997, there > was definitely no second pedalboard. > > Felix      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03 From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 08:43:01 -0500     >Dr. Amy Fleming writes: > >Yeah, the record is worn by many plays and has a lot of pops. etc. It = says >on the jacket that it can be played with stereo equip but I did not = realize >that there is a different stylus for mono. How does one know when a = stylus >is worn? How do you go about getting a new stylus these days, are they >interchangable? I searched on the web to see the album is still = available, >it is not. >Thanks for you help.   Amy and others,   Here in Canada we can order new styli from Radio Shack, which is Tandy in the USA.   Or you could do a search for styli or needles on the web, - I would think that there must be some suppliers who have a web page.   I get mine from Radio Shack so I have not looked any further.   Good luck,   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 09:28:40 -0500       Hell-Felix@t-online.de wrote: > > Stan Yoder wrote: > > > > Well, I did see a pic of the Ulm Walcker. The second > > pedalboard had very short naturals and was > > mounted at an angle, at the location of our swell shoes > > (over a wider expanse, of course.) Where the > > shoe(s) was/were I don't remember. A romantic Walcker > > would have had at least one. > > Where did you see that picture, and when was it taken? > When I performed at the Ulm Cathedral in June 1997, there > was definitely no second pedalboard. > > Felix   It was a long time ago, Felix, and even then the picture seemed old. = Anyone know about when the zwei-pedal Walcker was installed at Ulm?   Stan Yoder  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03 From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 09:45:58 -0800   >Stan Yoder wites, "Something else must be the cause, e.g., the record is >worn from many plays, it had been played with a worn stylus, if played by = a >stereo pickup the stylus may be riding the bottom of the groove, etc., = etc." > >Yeah, the record is worn by many plays and has a lot of pops. etc. It = says >on the jacket that it can be played with stereo equip but I did not = realize >that there is a different stylus for mono. How does one know when a = stylus >is worn? How do you go about getting a new stylus these days, are they >interchangable? I searched on the web to see the album is still = available, >it is not. >Thanks for you help. >Amy Fleming > A good stylus has a conical diamond tip. Worn it will approch the look of a chisel (flat sides on the cone). A magnifying glass would help. If in doubt - replace it!   mcmelectronics.com carries a full line.   John V  
(back) Subject: Phonograph Styli From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 09:56:59 -0500   I just did a quick search on the web for suppliers of phonograph styli, = and came up with thirty suppliers, - so they are there if you look.   I have been told that Radio Shack is still Radio Shack in the USA, - it is =   in the UK where the stores are known as Tandy.   You also wanted to know how you can tell if a stylus is worn, - when I could see rather better than I can now, I used to look at them through a microscope, - but I cannot do that now, so I rely on my ears!   However, a replacement stylus is not too expensive, and it is always worth =   while having one in hand.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Phono Styli From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 10:08:15 -0500       John Vanderlee wrote: > > A good stylus has a conical diamond tip. Worn it will approch the > look of a chisel (flat sides on the cone). A magnifying glass would > help. If in doubt - replace it! > > mcmelectronics.com carries a full line. > > John V   Actually, the conical tip has been largely replaced by elliptical shapes = of one sort or another. However, a 2.5mil or 3mil conical is best for mono LPs. Shure may have = them for their pickups. That is, if Shure is still in the pickup business.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Phono Styli From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 10:18:49 -0800   >John Vanderlee wrote: >> >> A good stylus has a conical diamond tip. Worn it will approch the >> look of a chisel (flat sides on the cone). A magnifying glass would >> help. If in doubt - replace it! >> >> mcmelectronics.com carries a full line. >> >> John V > >Actually, the conical tip has been largely replaced by elliptical >shapes of one sort or another. >However, a 2.5mil or 3mil conical is best for mono LPs. Shure may >have them for their pickups. That >is, if Shure is still in the pickup business. True enough. But the shape is still a cone, albeit an elliptical one. When you play a mono LP you should set your amp for the "mono mode" if at all possible. That cancels a lot of turntable rumble, so you you will ONLY hear the pedal notes in the low register (to keep this on topic) ;-)   mcmelectronics.com should be able to help you on all. At least they won't try to sell you 1. a cell phone, 2. a credit card, and 3. ask for your address so they can stuff your mailbox! unlike RS!   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 15:52:26 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Ron makes interesting points about the virtually world-wide destruction of church music and religious tradition.   Let's look at a slightly different agenda.   There is something terribly interesting about Holland which never fails to fascinate me and which concerns art. If you visit the galleries in Amsterdam and elsewhere, the dominant culture of paintings before the reformation was almost exculsively religious art. Thus, there are wonderful paintings of Bishops, churches, biblical scenes etc etc.   Move on just a few years, and religious art is nowhere to be seen.....or so it seems. (This is NOT a scholarly dissertation!)   The emphasis has moved towards the traders, politicians, learned people and things of a humanistic kind. Religious imagery almost disappears from popular art, but the church survived and they continued to build organs.   Ron seems to be making the point that "change" is the result of socialism and communism; though God only knows why he singles out Europe!   I see things very, very differently.   What I see in all the so-called "change" in music, services and the like, is an "old" guard still trying to maintain power and influence......making cosmetic changes to what is really quite medieval.   Many years ago, and at some length, I discussed this very publicly and stirred up a storm. I argued that REAL change had been non-existent, and merely reflected the fear of humanism and "the death of God movement" spawned of the quite brilliant theology of Germany before and during the 2nd World War.   The debate about Genesis in America is a debate about exactly the same arrogance of a faith system based on misplaced authority; the idea that the Bible is "God's word". (A curiously post-reformation idea).   Oddly enough, it doesn't mater whether one is conversing with a bible-bashing fundamentalist or a high-brow, conservative theologian.....they both agree on basics.   The "liberal" wing of thinking-theology is far more sophisticated.   So when we hear "pop" in church, I believe that we are witnessing the discredited theology of tradition.   Were churchpeople bright enough to shift the authority of their faith from "the word" to the practical imitation of what Jesus was all about, then they would have an immediate appeal across the board and probably wouldn't even NEED church music or a prayer book; let alone organs and choirs.   South America is such a political and economic mess, I am frankly surprised that there hasn't been revolution long before now. One of the richest regions in the world, with some of the poorest people......it is a scandal.   But hey-ho! Revolutions and reformations come and go, after which, everything settles down for a while and normal life resumes; usually with different rulers who know no better than the ones they replace!   Such is life.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Andres: > > The way I see it, damage was done, violence to the > churches, > their music   > It was about the time Communism, > and Socialism > began to cause trouble in Europe, spawned by the > secret societies. > Blanco was no different, and achieved his > distructive goal scattering > the efforts of priests and nuns an running them out > of the country, > a job he was deliberately sent in to do. Humanize > the country and > destroy the church and its goals and values which > Vatican II seemed > to support, All done on purpose I might add. It was > a world wide > movement, and hit everywhere like a hoard of storm > troopers. These > were and are extremely dangerous people. > > To be successful, most of all, get people to pray > again, God will listen. > > Ron Severin >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 11:04:01 -0500   On 3/3/03 7:44 AM, "Hell-Felix@t-online.de" <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> = wrote:   > Where did you see that picture, and when was it taken? > When I performed at the Ulm Cathedral in June 1997, there > was definitely no second pedalboard. > West gallery instrument, or the one on the south chancel wall?   Alan    
(back) Subject: pastor/musician relations From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 10:15:33 -0600   Hi! I have an idea which I will not put into context at this point but I'd like to get people's opinions on it.   First, I feel that if more pastors were musically knowledgeable and could sympathize with a church musician in his/her position of ministry then there would be more hope for good organists and church musicians to enhance worship in our churches.   Do you agree?   Second, do you think that a trained organist and church musician who feels called to pastoral ministry could be an advocate for church musicians and organists thereby again helping to improve the situation for organists and church musicians in this country?   Here's the context:   As a professional, non-degreed (yet) church organist, I feel called to pastoral ministry and am considering changing schools yet again to major in theology rather than music and minor in music, continuing organ study and studying conducting and harpsichord. I feel that I could be a real bridge to the clergy-musician gap and help to encourage musician-clergy relations on a larger level. Do you think this is realistic?     Blessings, Beau Surratt, Organist St. Peter's UCC, Elmhurst,IL Organ Performance Major, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb,IL      
(back) Subject: Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 11:24:00 -0500   Dear Colin, One of the things that entered my mind when you mentioned Holland was their need to improvise on hymns. My organ professor at Moravian during my short return to academia told me that their improvisations were impossible and that they did not have the discipline to stick to the written music. = Is there a possibility that the reason the Dutch have a vigorous religious segment is their ability to reinvent themselves and show that their music = in church is new and fresh? Don't know but those who have a copy of the ACCHO recording of the organ might remember that rendition of the 100th Psalm played by Antoni Scott written by a Dutch composer as an improvisation. Really inspiring. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 03, 2003 10:52 AM Subject: Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela     > Hello, > > Ron makes interesting points about the virtually > world-wide destruction of church music and religious > tradition. > > Let's look at a slightly different agenda. > > There is something terribly interesting about Holland > which never fails to fascinate me and which concerns > art. > If you visit the galleries in Amsterdam and elsewhere, > the dominant culture of paintings before the > reformation was almost exculsively religious art. > Thus, there are wonderful paintings of Bishops, > churches, biblical scenes etc etc. > > Move on just a few years, and religious art is nowhere > to be seen.....or so it seems. (This is NOT a > scholarly dissertation!) > > The emphasis has moved towards the traders, > politicians, learned people and things of a humanistic > kind. Religious imagery almost disappears from popular > art, but the church survived and they continued to > build organs. > > Ron seems to be making the point that "change" is the > result of socialism and communism; though God only > knows why he singles out Europe! > > I see things very, very differently. > > What I see in all the so-called "change" in music, > services and the like, is an "old" guard still trying > to maintain power and influence......making cosmetic > changes to what is really quite medieval. > > Many years ago, and at some length, I discussed this > very publicly and stirred up a storm. I argued that > REAL change had been non-existent, and merely > reflected the fear of humanism and "the death of God > movement" spawned of the quite brilliant theology of > Germany before and during the 2nd World War. > > The debate about Genesis in America is a debate about > exactly the same arrogance of a faith system based on > misplaced authority; the idea that the Bible is "God's > word". (A curiously post-reformation idea). > > Oddly enough, it doesn't mater whether one is > conversing with a bible-bashing fundamentalist or a > high-brow, conservative theologian.....they both agree > on basics. > > The "liberal" wing of thinking-theology is far more > sophisticated. > > So when we hear "pop" in church, I believe that we are > witnessing the discredited theology of tradition. > > Were churchpeople bright enough to shift the authority > of their faith from "the word" to the practical > imitation of what Jesus was all about, then they would > have an immediate appeal across the board and probably > wouldn't even NEED church music or a prayer book; let > alone organs and choirs. > > South America is such a political and economic mess, I > am frankly surprised that there hasn't been revolution > long before now. One of the richest regions in the > world, with some of the poorest people......it is a > scandal. > > But hey-ho! Revolutions and reformations come and go, > after which, everything settles down for a while and > normal life resumes; usually with different rulers who > know no better than the ones they replace! > > Such is life. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Andres: > > > > The way I see it, damage was done, violence to the > > churches, > > their music > > > It was about the time Communism, > > and Socialism > > began to cause trouble in Europe, spawned by the > > secret societies. > > Blanco was no different, and achieved his > > distructive goal scattering > > the efforts of priests and nuns an running them out > > of the country, > > a job he was deliberately sent in to do. Humanize > > the country and > > destroy the church and its goals and values which > > Vatican II seemed > > to support, All done on purpose I might add. It was > > a world wide > > movement, and hit everywhere like a hoard of storm > > troopers. These > > were and are extremely dangerous people. > > > > To be successful, most of all, get people to pray > > again, God will listen. > > > > Ron Severin > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Everything you'll ever need on one web page > from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts > http://uk.my.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 11:45:54 EST     --part1_170.1b781668.2b94e0c2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Felix:   There were five organs in Germany provided with double pedalboards. All we have are the pictures, as they were destroyed in the allied bombing raids. The last one was in Stuttgart's Stiftskirche in 1944. Both pedalboards were shorter than normal. The stops were arranged in straight wings with drawknobs on either side of the four manuals. The swell and crescendo pedals were elevated one between the 24th and 25 note and the other to the right of note 30 of the twin pedalboards. It really is a strange sight. The music rack was placed immediately above the fourth manual. This organ of course doesn't appear to have been a tracker. 17 of the drawknobs were twice as big around in diameter as all the rest. It was provided with two adjustable mirrors on either side of the music rack. it appears that there were two combination pistons on each manual.   The closest we can come to this today is an electrically divided pedal or pedal divide. It appears to be an experimental plaything and nothing more since it never universally caught on. It would certainly be uncomfortable to play, and very nonstandard.   Ron Severin   --part1_170.1b781668.2b94e0c2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Felix:<BR> <BR> There were five organs in Germany provided with double<BR> pedalboards. All we have are the pictures, as they were destroyed<BR> in the allied bombing raids. The last one was in Stuttgart's<BR> Stiftskirche in 1944. Both pedalboards were shorter than <BR> normal. The stops were arranged in straight wings with drawknobs<BR> on either side of the four manuals. The swell and crescendo<BR> pedals were elevated one between the 24th and 25 note and the<BR> other to the right of note 30 of the twin pedalboards. It really is<BR> a strange sight. The music rack was placed immediately above<BR> the fourth manual. This organ of course doesn't appear to have been <BR> a tracker. 17 of the drawknobs were twice as big around in diameter<BR> as all the rest. It was provided with two adjustable mirrors on either<BR> side of the music rack. it appears that there were two combination<BR> pistons on each manual.<BR> <BR> The closest we can come to this today is an electrically divided<BR> pedal or pedal divide. It appears to be an experimental plaything<BR> and nothing more since it never universally caught on. It would<BR> certainly be uncomfortable to play, and very nonstandard.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin </FONT></HTML>   --part1_170.1b781668.2b94e0c2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Colin Mitchell's post From: "Kevin L. Cischke" <ophicleide160@lycos.com> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 11:51:44 -0500     Colin Mitchell wrote:   > >The debate about Genesis in America is a debate about >exactly the same arrogance of a faith system based on >misplaced authority; the idea that the Bible is "God's >word". (A curiously post-reformation idea). > I find this to be qutie an interesting idea and would like him to explain = this more thoroughly. I am not sure I understand the point he is trying to = make.   What about it Colin?   Thanks Kevin Cischke     _____________________________________________________________ Get 25MB, POP3, Spam Filtering with LYCOS MAIL PLUS for $19.95/year. http://login.mail.lycos.com/brandPage.shtml?pageId=3Dplus&ref=3Dlmtplus  
(back) Subject: Re: LONG RE: The Churches and Young People Venezuela From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 12:20:36 -0800   >Dear Colin, > One of the things that entered my mind when you mentioned Holland = was >their need to improvise on hymns. My organ professor at Moravian during = my >short return to academia told me that their improvisations were = impossible >and that they did not have the discipline to stick to the written music. = Is >there a possibility that the reason the Dutch have a vigorous religious >segment is their ability to reinvent themselves and show that their music = in >church is new and fresh? Don't know but those who have a copy of the = ACCHO >recording of the organ might remember that rendition of the 100th Psalm >played by Antoni Scott written by a Dutch composer as an improvisation. >Really inspiring.   Have any of you ever heard the improvisations by the late (Dutch) Feike Asma? Refreshing and a pure delight!   John Vanderlee  
(back) Subject: RE: Organist's time pie chart From: "Cheryl Van Ornam" <cvanornam@newtonpres.org> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 14:22:52 -0500   I would be very interested in this chart, if you can dig it up.   Sincerely, Cheryl Van Ornam cvanornam@newtonpres.org   >>Subject: Organist's time pie chart I seem to recall seeing a pie chart of how a church musician/organist spends his/her time -- like x number of hours practicing, x number of hours preparing choir rehearsal, etc. It might have been in an AGO magazine, but I'm not sure. Anyone recall seeing this? If so, where?        
(back) Subject: Re: 6 manual organs From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 20:29:04 +0100   Hi jon,   From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> > I seem to remember an older Walker that had 2 pedalboards as > well? I wonder if it's still around.   Do you refer to the organ of the Stiftskirche in Stuttgart? This organ no longer exists. They will get a new organ from Orgelbau M=FChleisen.   http://www.stiftskirche-stuttgart.de/orgelbauverein.html   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs With Two Pedal Boards From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 20:45:43 +0100   Hi Malcom, > Malcolm Wechsler > First off, one needs to make a spelling distinction between the English > Walker and the German (E. F.) Walcker, now unfortunately no longer in > business.   Are you sure? http://www.walckerorgel.de/   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3511 - 03/02/03 From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 09:33:02 +1300   >I did not realize >that there is a different stylus for mono.   There isn't, necessarily. Stereo records were certainly non-compatible to start with, but quickly became playable with either stereo or modern = styli.   >How does one know when a stylus >is worn?   Look at it with a microscope to see if it is worn. Either that, or use = your ears. Sensitive ears can pick up wear on a stylus long before wear gets to = a "must replace" stage.   >How do you go about getting a new stylus these days, are they interchangable?   Here in NZ, in a place not too far from me, there is an outfit that still sells upwards of 200 different styli, and they have a machine that will check any stylus you bring in. It takes about 10 seconds.   Ross