PipeChat Digest #3529 - Monday, March 10, 2003
 
Lent I, St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church, Newport Beach CA USA  (X-
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Do it yourself projects(long)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
OUR BEST?
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Lent I, St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church, Newport Beach CA USA (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 09 Mar 2003 21:34:26 -0800   Sung Mass at 9 a.m.   Voluntary - Have Mercy Upon Me - Bach (misc. chorale-preludes) Processional - Forty Days & Forty Nights (Heinlein) Setting - Merbecke Gradual - Angelis suis - Fauxbourdon, Tone ij Tract - Psalm 3 - fauxbourdon, Tone i (we don't do the long Missal Tract) Offertory - Scapulis suis - C. Rossini / Clark - SAB Communion Verse - Scapulis suis - C. Rossini / Clark - SAB Communion Hymn - Bread of the World (Eucharistic Hymn) Orison - God Be In My Head (Lytlington) Recessional - Lord, Who Throughout These Forty Days (St. Flavian) no closing voluntary   Solem High Mass with incense at 11 a.m.   Voluntary - Have Mercy Upon Me - Bach (misc. chorale-preludes) Processional - Forty Days & Forty Nights (Heinlein) Introit - Invocabit me - arr. from Healy Willan - Tone VIIJ Setting - Mass IX (Gregorian) - yeah, yeah, I know; but they're still LEARNING it (grin) Gradual - Angelis suis - Tone ij Tract - Psalm 3 - Tone i (we don't do the long Missal Tract) Offertory - Scapulis suis - C. Rossini / Clark - unison Communion Verse - Scapulis suis - C. Rossini / Clark - unison Communion Hymn - Bread of the World (Eucharistic Hymn) Orison - God Be In My Head (Lytlington) Recessional - Lord, Who Throughout These Forty Days (St. Flavian) no closing voluntary   Good crowds at both Masses; of course, it HELPED there was a Vestry meeting after the Solemn Mass (grin). Choir was 3-2-3-2 at 9:00 ... good strong sound. The Solemn Mass is done by a chanter and the congregation. We managed to depose "Day By Day" in favour of "God Be In My Head" without causing a RIOT (grin). I was AMAZED (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Do it yourself projects(long) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 01:24:36 -0500   Daryl and others:   Lets look at specifications. A rule of thumb, if you only have one each of nazard and tierce you don't put them on the same manual as your Cromorne, Your Larigot goes there if you are going to have one. Specifications don't mean much if you buy an old Moeller lets say, with wind pressures, and pipes designed and built for an entirely different room. It takes an experienced expert to transform it to work in its new environment and sometimes get lucky. Mixtures are very tricky creatures especially used ones, and III rankers are out of balance usually for contrapuntal clarity.   Moeller chest work: Lets look at that. They are not all that easy to work on especially if they require a complete releather job. You can have anything done at a price, but is it always worth the trouble and money? I know quite a few folks out there that won't touch them with a 10' pole. They will suggest changing over to DE if it's feasable. The other alternative is ordering entirely new chests to keep costs down. The work guarantee is usually the deciding factor. The pipes will need revoicing in this case but they will anyway in the new room. Reeds need cleaning, as does the rest of the pipe work, modifications made. No two chambers are exactly alike, so modifications will be necessary to make things fit. Ease of tuning is another consideration, re-engineering walk boards and other access to the pipes a must. Don't expect the organ to sound the same as it did in the old building. It won't. Some ranks will need rescaling, and some removed for more appropriate material.   The story I liked best was a friend of a guy in Spain who wanted to build his own chime set recently. Most organ builders will go to a chime Mfg. Co. for those, or refurbish old ones. Nobody in their right mind would consider building a set from scratch. It's a specialized art. But there are those stalwarts out there who think they can because they are good with their hands. It makes no good common sense, but they keep trying. You've got to hand them that. Rube Goldburg didn't make a very good organ or chimes for that matter. We get called out for dead notes and cyphers. Tuning problems abound but Rube is still busy cranking them out for a while.   Specifications take a special hand to make them blend and work.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: OUR BEST? From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 22:35:40 -0800 (PST)   Today I went to meet a friend for a recital, and parked in the parking lot of a church which I occasionally go.   They moved their guitar twanging hootenanny service to 6:30 PM.   I got there early, and went in for a drink of water, and the "musicians" were rehearsing for the service. It sounded like Saturday night at Rose's Cantina. To me, there wasn't the slightest hint of anything resembling a church.   If this is what churches are degenerating to, I really think that we should seriously consider putting in a bar so that we may at least fortify ourselves with a martini before having this trash inflicted on us; that is, if there is anyone in attendance who actually has any musical taste.   D. Keith Morgan   __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - forms, calculators, tips, more http://taxes.yahoo.com/