PipeChat Digest #3532 - Monday, March 10, 2003
 
Re: releathering Moller chests
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: ANOTHER RANT I agree with .......
  by "Daryl Robinson" <drobinson@houston.rr.com>
Re: releathering Moller chests
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Hot News Flash
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Hot News Flash
  by "Joshua Edwards" <organman@cablenet-va.com>
Re: CC's opinion about Walcker
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: it's all in what you're USED to
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
News of my demise is premature!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hot News Flash
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
liturgical? passive? NO WAY!
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: it's all in what you're USED to
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Hot News Flash--or so he says
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
MP3's
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: releathering Moller chests From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 14:57:30 -0800   As I understand it, the "cushion" of air that's present in electro-pneumatic action ISN'T present in electro-mechanical action, unless they build something resembling "qualifying tubes" between each valve and pipe-foot to PROVIDE that cushion. As a result, the speech is more abrupt, and (I understand) a pipe voiced for a pitman chest is likely to overblow and THEN settle down to the fundamental when placed on an electro-mechanical chest, if it's not revoiced.   The problem of space for the magnets in the treble remains, if you're trying to re-use the pitman top-boards.   Since releathering existing pitmans is SLIGHTLY cheaper than building NEW electro-mechanical chests, I'd restore what's there, since according to all my information, it's NOT feasible to CHANGE pitman chests TO electro-mechanical. As one correspondent said, every job he's worked on where that was done was "Mickey Mouse" (Disney tm) and prone to early failure.   Cheers,   Bud   Luther Melby wrote: > > The Moller organ that I installed in my church is a 1926 model. It has = all > the original > chest leather. I shudder to think of when we need to redo it. > I don't understand the comment about "wholesale revoicing" the pipes. > In both cases the pipes stand over a valve that is directly below them, > The only difference, that I see, is in how they are opened. > If I had my way, in our situation, I would go for the electro mech. > If for no other reason than for the repair work in the future. > > A hobbyist, > Luther > > -----Original Message----- > From: quilisma@socal.rr.com <quilisma@socal.rr.com> > To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Monday, March 10, 2003 7:54 AM > Subject: releathering Moller chests > > >We bought a '66 Moller a couple of years ago and put it into storage > >until the new church was built. We investigated releathering vs. new > >pitman chests. One builder DID want to take the old Moller chests and > >change them to electro-mechanical action. But several OTHER builders > >told me that wasn't feasible ... the pipes would require wholesale > >revoicing, and there wasn't room for individul magnets in the treble. > > > >clip > >Cheers, > > > >Bud > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: ANOTHER RANT I agree with ....... From: "Daryl Robinson" <drobinson@houston.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 16:56:04 -0600   I deffinently agree with that. Its interesting at all the churches I sub for, rather USED to sub for = always complained about the organists inability to play a church service. The inability to improvise or even to fill in little nuances where needed. At the University of Houston where Im a student they offer a church music class, however I dont think its very adequate and Robert Bates does NOT teach the class, one of his TA does. But, having David Ashley White as a dean helps..........I think we probably have more church music classes = than most Universities. If you all arnt familiar with Robert or David you = should look them up on the net. Both are wonderful musicians and great people to work with.   I am probably the only person in the studio at UH with a high-profile = church job. Most of them turn their noses up at working at a church and only do = it for the money. I personally love working with the people and enjoy the thrill of playing in worship. My congregation thanks me by staying for the postludes as well as aplauding whenver there is an opportunity. I think liturgy has a place in worship but some churches that are BOUND to the liturgy to me is just a little rediculous and all alot of these minsters = do is read the text to the congregation. At Friendswood UMC we have two = rather large projection screens which I at first laughed at, but after time has gone by they really are quite beneficial to the congregation. Our services move rather quickly and are not dull except for the prayer and silent moments in the services. The congregation sings a little easier almost without having to look at the hymnal. We print the words AND the music on the screen. Most the time just the melody with the text underneath that.   One aspect of worship Ive noticed that is shall we say hurting traditional worship is that all the great hymsn of tradition are always singing ABOUT God as apposed to the contemporary songs that are actually singing TO God and creating a irecto connection. I do of course feel that there are flaws in contemporary worship in that most of the time the people sit and = receive the word and the song and do not really have to participate or get up and jump and do other unmentionable things ;) Seems much more like a rock concert. But I think some traditonal worship services get caught in the = same thing where the congregation just kinda sits there and follows along or recieves the word and thats it. They sing on the hymns, but most not very enthusiastically. People in our area say they want to return to the HEART = OF WORSHIP. Which to them is a direct connection with God........a personal relationship that is often times missing in our worship these days. Im = glad to say that at Friendswood we follow the liturgical year but we are not BOUND by it and we do not simply allow the people to sit and recieve, much participation is involved. Its a caring and very loving congregation and = we average a growth of 300 a year, roughly........   Traditonal or contemporary, which ever is the case.......some people are just more comfortable in one or the other or in a blended situation, just the fact of the way it is. We often times bring in PART of, not ALL, but PART of the praise band to do an offertory of a suitable nature. No = jumping and banging, but there really are some LOVELY contemporary worship pieces that work beautifully in a traditional setting. Our congregation atleast loves to hear the contemporary, a Bach Prelude and Fuge, and a John Rutter anthem.......Id say were pretty blended!   Hope that makes some sense to atleast someone.   Daryl     ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 8:25 AM Subject: Re: ANOTHER RANT I agree with .......     > > > Mattcinnj wrote: > > > > I agree 1000%. I would also include the colleges that did, and still > > do, produce efficient key pushers instead of musicians capable of > > inspiring a congregation. Being on the Music Committee for a NJ > > church, I have auditioned Westminster Choir College majors and > > graduates that can WOW you with a major Bach work but can't play Hymns > > and don't understand registration. I voiced comments similar to yours > > on Pipe-orgl and promptly was reamed a new "you know what". > > > > Hope you fare better ! > > > > Matt > > > > What Matt said, on both counts (grin). > > When I was an undergrad in the 1960s, there were NO church music courses > at Oberlin; when I transferred to Cincinnati after dropping out to work > for five years, there was one ... a throwaway "Music of the Liturgies" > that was taught by a tenured professor who hadn't "worked out." > > I distinctly remember both faculties' attitude toward church jobs: they > were a place to practice and pick up some extra cash, but heaven FORFEND > if you put any time or ENERGY into them. > > *I* tangled with the Powers-That-Are on piporg-1 for daring to suggest > that the future of the organ, for good or for ill, rests with the > churches, rather than the academic world and/or the concert stage. > Though there HAS been a surge in new concert-hall organs lately, how > many of those involve full-time POSITIONS? The population of students in > organ departments nation-wide (in the US) has dropped precipitously ... > how many college organ teaching job are there? How many are full-time? > How many WILL there be in ten years? > > The church music situation IS pretty grim in the US ... churches > ditching organs in favor of praise bands ... but the NUMBERS are still > what they are. GOOD church organists are scarce as hen's teeth ... there > are MORE than enough church jobs to go around. > > MOST of what I do on a day-to-day basis, I taught MYSELF *after* > college, or already knew when I went ... my rector in high school had > studied organ with Tertius Noble ... I learned service-playing from HIM, > and from my first organ teacher, who was also a Noble pupil. The rest > ... orchestration, music engraving, arranging, administration, library > skills, choral and organ repertoire for CHURCH, etc. I picked up along > the way informally. > > It's unfortunately we don't have the "articled pupil" and apprenticeship > system they have in the U.K. ... cathedral and collegiate organists are > often "old boys" from the choir who deputised at the organ when they > were growing up. They have the repertoire, the particular organ, and the > Customary in their BLOOD. Of course, that's not really possible in the > multi-denominational U.S., but there has to be a better way than what > we're doing NOW, which is basically NOTHING in the way of training > CHURCH musicians. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: releathering Moller chests From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 18:08:47 EST     --part1_f4.2a29d4f4.2b9e74ff_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Luther and all........   Just FYI, how the valve opens does indeed have an effect on the pipe = speech, hence the potential need for a voicer if the valve type is changed.   Bill   --part1_f4.2a29d4f4.2b9e74ff_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D3 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Luther and all........<BR> <BR> Just FYI, how the valve opens does indeed have an effect on the pipe = speech,=3D hence the potential need for a voicer if the valve type is changed.<BR> <BR> Bill</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f4.2a29d4f4.2b9e74ff_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Hot News Flash From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 18:30:21 -0500   In my endless pursuit of news and information concerning our beloved instrument and its impact upon modern society, I have stumbled across an astounding announcement that may have far reaching repercussions for the promotion and popularization of the pipe organ within the (shall we say), less refined elements of our population. Though probably not intended, the actions of a certain very popular new television program just might be the breath of fresh air (no pun intended) we have all been looking for to stem the tide of disenfranchisement currently being suffered by the King of Instruments.   Please take the time to tune into the Discovery Channel tonight to view the hot new show "Monster Garage". For those uninitiated to the premise of this apocalyptic documentary program, host Jesse James, a West Coast motorcycle chopper shop owner, employs a crew of modern technical experts befitting his own high social strata, to take a perfectly good vehicle, such as a Porsche, Mustang Convertible, or even a Lincoln Limo, and proceeded to partially demolish it, and then refabricate it into something for which it was seemingly never intended. For example, the Porsche became a golf ball retriever at a driving range, the Mustang became a high performance lawn mower, and the Limo became a full blown pumper fire truck.   So, you might ask, what has all this to do with the topic of this group?   Tonight Jesse and crew will convert a Chevy Suburban into a mobile wedding chapel. And the best part is, it will be equipped with a fully functional AIR POWERED PIPE ORGAN.   Move over Reginald Foort Cheers Mike          
(back) Subject: Re: Hot News Flash From: "Joshua Edwards" <organman@cablenet-va.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 18:42:27 -0500   I just checked the Discovery website. Not only is an air-powered pipe organ, but a fire-breathing air-powered pipe organ! (an automated rice thrower too!)   Josh     Mike Gettelman wrote:   >In my endless pursuit of news and information >concerning our beloved instrument and its impact upon >modern society, I have stumbled across an astounding >announcement that may have far reaching repercussions >for the promotion and popularization of the pipe organ >within the (shall we say), less refined elements of our >population. Though probably not intended, the actions >of a certain very popular new television program just >might be the breath of fresh air (no pun intended) we >have all been looking for to stem the tide of >disenfranchisement currently being suffered by the King >of Instruments. > >Please take the time to tune into the Discovery Channel >tonight to view the hot new show "Monster Garage". For >those uninitiated to the premise of this apocalyptic >documentary program, host Jesse James, a West Coast >motorcycle chopper shop owner, employs a crew of modern >technical experts befitting his own high social strata, >to take a perfectly good vehicle, such as a Porsche, >Mustang Convertible, or even a Lincoln Limo, and >proceeded to partially demolish it, and then >refabricate it into something for which it was >seemingly never intended. For example, the Porsche >became a golf ball retriever at a driving range, the >Mustang became a high performance lawn mower, and the >Limo became a full blown pumper fire truck. > >So, you might ask, what has all this to do with the >topic of this group? > >Tonight Jesse and crew will convert a Chevy Suburban >into a mobile wedding chapel. And the best part is, it >will be equipped with a fully functional AIR POWERED >PIPE ORGAN. > > Move over Reginald Foort > Cheers > Mike > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: CC's opinion about Walcker From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 23:49:49 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I am very grateful to Andres for posting the Cavaille-Coll comments about E F Walcker; quite a fascinating insight into what must surely have been a very international difference of approach to organ building, and the traditions associated especially with German organ music of the period.   It is interesting on several counts.   Firstly, Cavaille-Coll "possibly" demonstrates that he did not fully understand the German tradition of early romantic organ music.   One wonders whether he truly understood the Baroque background to German Romantic organ-building, and especially the absence of proper Swell (Recit) divisions which, in French organs, tend to dominate the whole symphonic expression of the instruments built in France.   In referring to "lungs", was Cavaille-Coll referring to "wind-pressure" only?   His obvious preference for heavier wind-pressures is at total odds with what the German builders built.   The comment about a "lack of clarity" is interesting......my guess is that the Germanic use of Tierces did not appeal to him. They certainly cloud things to some extent, but they also impart a richness to the chorus-work which, make often up for the bloodless German reeds of the period.   I learned something about the "cone chest" and the forerunner of the general crescendo (Rollschweller?_) which Andres sugests was invented by Merklin......more information would be greatly appreciated on this.   I had always thought (wrongly?) that this was a Walcker invention.   The clear admiration which Cavaille-Coll had for the organ at Ulmer Minster is interesting, but of even greater interest is his reference to new developments by Walcker. We do know, of course, that Walcker experimented with large wooden pipes and "draughts up chimmneys". The company also experimented with the fashionable "harmonium sound", with "free reeds" enclosed in a box with a hinged lid.....a sort of "bees in a box sound".   I cannot imagine that Cavaille-Coll would appreciate the lack of expression boxes!   Interestingly, the "over-blowing" harmonic stops were introduced by German builders within a short time....was this a direct result of Cavaille-Coll input?   As I say, all very fascinating.   The one chuckle I had concerned the French and German soldiers!   In retrospect..........   Still, even Cavaille-Coll couldn't get it right all the time.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   >       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 18:51:16 -0500   On 3/10/03 2:53 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> wrote:   > *I* find substituting in a protestant church to be TOTALLY > confusing (grin), since every one is different. I remember one in > particular where it seemed like I was dinging the chimes every five > minutes to signal for this or that thing to happen (stand up, sit down, > begin the call to worship, children return from Sunday School, etc.) ... > and they were JUST as Pavlovian as Catholics are with the Sanctus bells > (chuckle) ... I forgot one "ding", and the minister had to TELL them > what to do (grin).   How very amusingly true. "Pavlovian" is exactly the right word.   Alan, slobbering    
(back) Subject: News of my demise is premature! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 23:55:34 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Following the death of my Mother during the past week.....not unexpected.....I will be changing address.   As a result, my ISP will be changing addresses also, with an upgrade to Broadband at the same time.   I may therefore disappear for a week or two and then re-appear with a new e-mail address etc.   I hope I don't miss anything too fascinating or important!   As they used to say at the BBC....."Normal service will be resumed as soon as possible"   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Hot News Flash From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 19:04:29 -0500   Hi Josh, I knew there was a reason I called it a "HOT" news flash. (grin). I just hope they don't explode any of those poor pigeon's bellies with all that rice.     Joshua Edwards wrote:   > I just checked the Discovery website. Not only is an air-powered pipe > organ, but a fire-breathing air-powered pipe organ! (an automated rice > thrower too!) > > Josh    
(back) Subject: liturgical? passive? NO WAY! From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 16:17:39 -0800       Daryl Robinson wrote: > >(snip) > > I think > liturgy has a place in worship but some churches that are BOUND to the > liturgy to me is just a little rediculous and all alot of these minsters = do > is read the text to the congregation.   Um, I think John and Charles Wesley would disagree with you (grin). Read John Wesley's "Order for Sunday Service" ... it's the straight 1662 Anglican Book of Common Prayer. John Wesley lived and died as a priest of the Established Church in England; in fact, Wesley EXCOMMUNICATED Francis Asbury for accepting election as bishop without proper episcopal consecration.   And, our priests don't just "read the text to the congregation" ... the congregation has a great DEAL to do, which they do with GREAT enthusiasm .... hymns, chants, prayers ... unlike the Eastern Orthodox liturgy, the Western Eucharist has a great MANY parts that change EVERY DAY, and the congregation is involved in MOST of them.   A typical Sunday Mass at St. Matthew's (* indicates sung items)   Voluntary - organ *Processional Hymn - congregation *Introit - choir *Kyrie - congregation Prayer - priest Epistle - reader *Gradual - choir *Tract or Alleluia - congregation Gospel - deacon Credo - congregation Offertory Sentences - priest *Offertory Verse - choir *Doxology - congregation Prayer for the Church - priest Invitation - deacon Confession - congregation Absolution - priest Comfortable Words - deacon *Sursum corda - priest and congregation *Preface - priest *Sanctus & Benedictus - congregation Prayer of Consecration, Oblation, Invocation - priest *Great Amen - congregation Lord's Prayer - congregation Peace - priest and congregation Prayer of Humble Access - congregation *Agnus Dei - congregation *Communion Verse - choir *Communion Anthem - choir *Communion Hymn - congregation General Thanksgiving - congregation Blessing - priest *Kneeling Hymn - congregation Announcements - priest *Dismissal - deacon *Recessional Hymn - congregation Voluntary - organ   At Friendswood UMC we have two rather > large projection screens which I at first laughed at, but after time has > gone by they really are quite beneficial to the congregation. Our = services > move rather quickly and are not dull except for the prayer and silent > moments in the services.   I have often chuckled at the "anti-liturgical" stance of protestant churches when I used to play in them on Sunday nights ... the "Long Prayer" (as the Presbyterians used to call it) or the "Pastoral Prayer" (as I presume the Methodists still call it) ALWAYS, but ALWAYS prayed for the SAME things in the SAME order in VIRTUALLY the same LANGUAGE every Sunday! That's JUST as liturgical as our (fixed) "Prayer for the Whole State of Christ's Church".   Silence isn't dull ... you're SUPPOSED to listen to what GOD has to say in the silence ... "O still small voice of calm", as the hymn has it; or "Let all mortal flesh keep SILENCE" ...   The congregation sings a little easier almost > without having to look at the hymnal. We print the words AND the music = on > the screen. Most the time just the melody with the text underneath that.   Um ... haven't found projection screens with Tudor gothic mahogany frames yet (grin) ... think we'll stick to the hymnals and prayer books and the occasional bulletin insert. > > One aspect of worship Ive noticed that is shall we say hurting = traditional > worship is that all the great hymsn of tradition are always singing = ABOUT > God as apposed to the contemporary songs that are actually singing TO = God > and creating a irecto connection.   I haven't seen the latest Methodist hymnal; there USED to be a balance. I don't see the problem here ... God has many attributes; hymns are (or should be) teaching tools; we sing ABOUT the Trinity in "Holy, Holy, Holy"; we address ourselves directly TO God in "My Faith Looks Up To Thee" ... We usually sing the objective liturgical hymns for processional and recessional, and reserve the "Jesus and Me" hymns for communion, since communion is an intensely PERSONAL experience to most Anglicans.   I do of course feel that there are flaws > in contemporary worship in that most of the time the people sit and = receive > the word and the song and do not really have to participate or get up = and > jump and do other unmentionable things ;) Seems much more like a rock > concert. But I think some traditonal worship services get caught in the = same > thing where the congregation just kinda sits there and follows along or > recieves the word and thats it. They sing on the hymns, but most not = very > enthusiastically. People in our area say they want to return to the = HEART OF > WORSHIP.   Um ... hello! The HEART of worship is the Breaking of Bread, and 90% of Christendom still DOES it as the principal Sunday service; we forget that in the poly-denominational U.S.   Which to them is a direct connection with God........a personal > relationship that is often times missing in our worship these days. Im = glad > to say that at Friendswood we follow the liturgical year but we are not > BOUND by it and we do not simply allow the people to sit and recieve, = much > participation is involved. Its a caring and very loving congregation and = we > average a growth of 300 a year, roughly........   Hmmm ... have to correct your misapprehension that "liturgical equals passive" ... except in a Roman Catholic Tridentine Solemn Mass in Latin, liturgical worship involves much MORE participation and ACTION than the typical protestant preaching service. And even in a Tridentine Mass, the people very DEVOUTLY participate INTERIORLY.   I always felt like there was this great indigesible LUMP of a 40-45 minute sermon in protestant services ... most people were COMATOSE by the time it was over, no matter HOW good it was ... it was EXTREMELY difficult to keep a celebratory mood through THAT ... so it was basically "give up, sing the last hymn, and go home" (chuckle).   After fifty years on the bench, I can honestly say that I've not heard more than a dozen preachers, protestant OR Catholic, who had much to say that was worth listening to. In most cases, the liturgy, if done RIGHT, with attention and devotion, SAYS all that NEEDS to be said.   > Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 19:49:00 EST     --part1_178.1757356e.2b9e8c7c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Speaking of chimes, at one church the organ chimes had a switch which = would put it to an outside speaker, which was chimed at 11:00 on Sunday morning. = Then the switch was turned off. My first Sunday there, you guessed it, I forgot to turn off the switch. Not only were the chimes on the outside speaker, so was the entire organ. The church receive a complaint and a ticket for disturbing the peace. It awakened a doctor who lived across = the street from the church. Lee   --part1_178.1757356e.2b9e8c7c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#400040" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Speaking of chimes, at one = church t=3D he organ chimes had a switch which would put it to an outside speaker, = which=3D was chimed at 11:00 on Sunday morning.&nbsp; Then the switch was turned = off=3D ..&nbsp; My first Sunday there, you guessed it, I forgot to turn off the = swit=3D ch.&nbsp; Not only were the chimes on the outside speaker, so was the = entire=3D organ.&nbsp; The church receive a complaint and a ticket for disturbing = the=3D peace.&nbsp; It awakened a doctor who lived across the street from the = chur=3D ch.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_178.1757356e.2b9e8c7c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Hot News Flash--or so he says From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 20:01:33 -0500   On 3/10/03 7:04 PM, "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> wrote:   > I called it a "HOT" news flash.   Thanks a bunch. Well, maybe I'm a literalist.   Alan (wondering what you do when you have "a 'HOT' news flash")    
(back) Subject: MP3's From: "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 17:28:29 -0800 (PST)   --0-393583462-1047346109=3D:30031 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii     In case by some small chance anyone is interested. I have some mp3's = taken from recent services at church. If you go to:   briefcase.yahoo.com/~tevansmo@prodigy.net   You should be able to find them under the Holy Cross Lutheran folder.   The best bet will be to copy the link into your browser rather than just = click on it.   Travis   --0-393583462-1047346109=3D:30031 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <P>In case by some small chance anyone is interested.&nbsp; I have some = mp3's taken from recent services at church.&nbsp; If you go to:</P> <P><A = href=3D"mailto:briefcase.yahoo.com/~tevansmo@prodigy.net">briefcase.yahoo.c= om/~tevansmo@prodigy.net</A> </P> <P>You should be able to find them under the Holy Cross Lutheran = folder.</P> <P>The best bet will be to copy the link into your browser rather than = just click on it.&nbsp; </P> <P>Travis</P> --0-393583462-1047346109=3D:30031--