PipeChat Digest #3534 - Tuesday, March 11, 2003
 
Re: Oboe
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Recital in Kalamazoo, Michigan
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
Re: Easter Suggestions?
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
WOOPS- Re: Recital in Kalamazoo, Michigan
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "Stephen Best" <sbest@borg.com>
Looking for Richard G. Fish
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Oboe
  by "MediaConstituents" <kealypaul@yahoo.com>
Re: Oboe
  by "MediaConstituents" <kealypaul@yahoo.com>
Walnut Creek:  Lynn
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: it's all in what you're USED to
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
RE: ANOTHER RANT I agree with .......
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: releathering Moller chests
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Bach Dupre edition
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: CC's opinion about Walcker
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: it's all in what you're USED to
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Oboe From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 07:06:38 -0500   Any orchestra- even a chamber orchestra- needs 2 oboes, and any full size orchestra needs at least 3. Competetion for full time gigs is tough for = any instrument, but have you looked at the number of flute players and = clarinet players out there? A good oboist is always going to be in demand.   P   ><<<<<<But I'd like to hear their *opinion* of the oboe or the = violoncello. >Do >they even have one? Do you envy the job prospects of an applied major in >French horn?>>>> > > Both my daughters played oboe in high school and college, and won all >the prizes that were available, including trips and college scholarship >money. > Daughter #2 really wanted to go to music college and major in oboe. = I'm >afraid we had to spend quite a bit of effort gently guiding her in = another >direction, because the chances of getting a real job playing oboe are >practically nil. Every big orchestra has one--------one. Maybe two at = the >most. > We told her to find a community band and keep right on enjoying it, = but >study something else in college as a profession to make a living. > So she's a florist-----every city, town and village in the country = has a >plant and flower business, she can get a job or start a business = anywhere. >And the community band she found was absolutely delighted to get her! > Big difference between being appreciated and having to fight for a >position. > >Diane S. > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Recital in Kalamazoo, Michigan From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 06:57:18 -0600   Christ Lane, following a very successful recital last night in Little Rock, AR, will be playing the same program this coming Friday night, March 14 beginning at 8PM on the new Nichols & Simpson Organ in the Cathedral of St. Augustine in Kalamazoo.- http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com/st4.htm   Chris, a 21 year old student at Eastman and a student of David Higgs, is someone to "watch out for" in the future. His playing is very technically secure and his musicianship is wonderful. His playing of the Bridge Adagio last night had everyone so moved that no one wanted to "break the spell" for several seconds with applause.   If you get a chance to hear this young man play do yourself a favor and get to one of his recitals, you won't be disappointed.   His program for Friday is as follows:   "The World Awaiting the Savior (from Symphonie-Passion, Op 23) - Marcel Dup= re   Pastorale and Scherzetto (24 Pieces in Free Style, Op 31) - Louis Vierne   Adagio in E - Frank Bridge   =46ree Fantasia on "O Zion, Haste" and "How Firm a Foundation" - William Bol= com   Partita on "Sei gegr=FCsset, Jesu g=FCtig", BWV 768 - J.S. Bach   "There is a Happy Land" and " I Love Thee, My Lord" (from Sacred Sounds for Organ) - George Shearing   =46inal (Symphonie 1) - Vierne     David  
(back) Subject: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 05:34:23 -0800 (PST)   There has been much said recently about whether to have two or three manuals.   I just serviced an organ in Dallas that has 38 ranks of pipes. There is no mixture in the great, and there are no general pistons. It has three 8' Open Diapasons in the great; the First 8' Open Diapason has leathered lips and is cut unbelievably high. The three diapasons are absolutely useless. There is also a Stentorphone in the solo that will blow the windows out of the church. It, too, has leathered lips.   This monstrosity has 38 ranks of pipes, but has the biggest five-manual console you ever saw. Nobody could begin to play a recital on this mess.   Three or four manuals are nice, but in order to play music well, you MUST have each division complete up to the proper mixtures and reeds. You can have 20 manuals that are skimpy and incomplete, and you have nothing.   Trying to play a recital on one of these unit pipe collections is like trying to take a praze band and a quartet of youths and trying to do Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.   D. Keith Morgan   __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Web Hosting - establish your business online http://webhosting.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Suggestions? From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 08:47:25 -0500   Gerald Near, A Prelude for Easter. Incorporates the plainsong "Haec dies" = and hymn "O Filii et Filiae." Ends triumphantly with the latter. I have used a trumpet in place = of the organ for the F-et-F melody.   Then there's Langlais' "Mors et Resurrectio." Terrific stem-winder.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh    
(back) Subject: WOOPS- Re: Recital in Kalamazoo, Michigan From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 08:12:58 -0600   At 6:57 AM -0600 03/11/03, David Scribner wrote: >Christ Lane, following a very successful recital last night i   It was just pointed out to me that I made a typo at the very beginning of my post. <G>   The name should be either "Chris" or "Christian" Lane - That is what I get for trying to post before having a full pot of Coffee!   David  
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 14:49:36 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Well I once managed the William Tell Overture on a Wurlitzer with but 22 ranks.   Sounded OK to me!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> wrote: > > .......Trying to play a recital on one of these unit > pipe > collections is like trying to take a praze band and > a > quartet of youths and trying to do Beethoven's Ninth > Symphony.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 06:55:09 -0800 (PST)   Try playing a trio sonata on a 22-rank Wurlitzer.     --- Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Hello, > > Well I once managed the William Tell Overture on a > Wurlitzer with but 22 ranks. > > Sounded OK to me! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> > wrote: > > > .......Trying to play a recital on one of these > unit > > pipe > > collections is like trying to take a praze band > and > > a > > quartet of youths and trying to do Beethoven's > Ninth > > Symphony. > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Everything you'll ever need on one web page > from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts > http://uk.my.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Web Hosting - establish your business online http://webhosting.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 15:05:55 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Easy peasy!   Chrysoglot right hand, 8ft and 2ft Flutes Left Hand, 8ft string on the Pedal! (Trems strictly verbotten)   Bach takes on a whole new dimension.   Hey! And you can play Couperin and de Grigny on a Wurlitzer to great effect. Can't do THAT on a Harrison & Harrison.   :) Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "Stephen Best" <sbest@borg.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 10:29:48 -0500   Seems this isn't as "far out" for a trio sonata as one might think. I recall one recital on an early 20th century 4 manual Austin. The recitalist didn't have the slightest idea how to work with this instrument, but in at least one show of originality, she registered a movement of a trio sonata just as Colin suggested. Sadly, that was the high point of the recital.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Colin Mitchell wrote:   >Hello, > >Easy peasy! > >Chrysoglot right hand, 8ft and 2ft Flutes Left Hand, >8ft string on the Pedal! (Trems strictly verbotten) >      
(back) Subject: Looking for Richard G. Fish From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 10:36:06 -0500   Dear chatters: Is anyone aware of the existence of a Richard G. Fish? I understand he is = an organ builder with twenty years experience and may be living in Southern Ontario. Thanks, Andrew Mead      
(back) Subject: Re: Oboe From: "MediaConstituents" <kealypaul@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 08:01:31 -0800 (PST)   I agree with the other Paul about oboe.   Looking for musicians on oboe and horns in F for my performances has always been a challenge, so I agree that although there are not as many parts written for these instruments, the truth is that the competition is far less intensive, so go for it.   I thought I had died and gone to heaven when I found the husband of a choir member had a PhD in oboe, and taught music at California State University. It was a new choir position for me, and I was putting together a small orchestra for my new choir.   When I asked why he had never been asked to perform, they told me he was Catholic and we were Protestant. Well, enough of that. I asked him to play Ave Maria for our Christmas program, and before long he was an important part of our musical program. People who had never heard the rare touch of the oboe were amazed.   Anyhow, I never fail to encourage good instrumentalists to pursue oboe as an instrument.   __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Web Hosting - establish your business online http://webhosting.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Oboe From: "MediaConstituents" <kealypaul@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 08:02:32 -0800 (PST)   Plus, it's a great instrument to TUNE to.   __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Web Hosting - establish your business online http://webhosting.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Walnut Creek: Lynn From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:04:00 -0500   Tried without success to send this to you, Lynn, privately; so please = excuse use of group space.   Spotted your post on PipeChat this morning (from yestereve).   Just idly curious: Which church in Walnut Creek?   I had cousins who lived there, oh, 40-50 years ago; they were Missouri Synod. But more to the point, a friend of mine, John Sherer (Scherer?--I don't think so), formerly our organist at Saint Luke's ELCA, Manhattan, spent some time at an Episcopal parish in Walnut Creek, oh, maybe c. 1990. (He's now at Fourth Presbyterian, Chicago: 126 ranks of excellence. A = fine man.)   Alan Freed www.stlukesnyc.org for photos of our organ, etc.      
(back) Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 11:35:29 -0600     --Boundary_(ID_7e+odJgQDR8qI8YbSd94EQ) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3DISO-8859-1; format=3Dflowed Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   And did you pay the fine for disturbing the peace?   Some years back, several churches here were issued tickets for = ringing=3D20=3D   their bells on Sunday mornings and waking non-church-going = neighbours.=3D20=3D   (Not mind you for broadcasting an entire service from the bell-tower!)   In all cases, they were unrepentent, refused to pay the fines citing=3D20 the long-standing tradition of ringing bells to summon the parish to=3D20 worship, and continued ringing their bells. And the whole thing blew=3D20 over in a matter of a few weeks, the sleepless neighbours not being=3D20 heard from since then.   TTFN, Russ     On Monday, March 10, 2003, at 06:49 PM, chicaleee@aol.com wrote:   > The church receive a complaint and a ticket for disturbing the = peace.=3DA0=3D =3D20 > It awakened a doctor who lived across the street from the church.=3DA0 = =3D Lee   --Boundary_(ID_7e+odJgQDR8qI8YbSd94EQ) Content-type: text/enriched; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   And did you pay the fine for disturbing the peace?     Some years back, several churches here were issued tickets for ringing their bells on Sunday mornings and waking non-church-going neighbours. (Not mind you for broadcasting an entire service from the bell-tower!)     In all cases, they were unrepentent, refused to pay the fines citing the long-standing tradition of ringing bells to summon the parish to worship, and continued ringing their bells. And the whole thing blew over in a matter of a few weeks, the sleepless neighbours not being heard from since then.     TTFN,   Russ       On Monday, March 10, 2003, at 06:49 PM, chicaleee@aol.com wrote:     =3D <excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param><color><param>4040,0000,4040</par= =3D am><smaller>The church receive a complaint and a ticket for disturbing the peace.=3DA0 It awakened a doctor who lived across the street from the church.=3DA0 =3D Lee</smaller></color></fontfamily>   </excerpt>=3D   --Boundary_(ID_7e+odJgQDR8qI8YbSd94EQ)--  
(back) Subject: RE: ANOTHER RANT I agree with ....... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:56:45 -0500         > Mattcinnj wrote: > > > > I agree 1000%. I would also include the colleges that did, and still > > do, produce efficient key pushers instead of musicians capable of > > inspiring a congregation. Being on the Music Committee for a NJ > > church, I have auditioned Westminster Choir College majors and > > graduates that can WOW you with a major Bach work but can't play Hymns > > and don't understand registration. I voiced comments similar to yours > > on Pipe-orgl and promptly was reamed a new "you know what". > > > > Hope you fare better ! > > > > Matt > > > Bud has replied to this already, and I always love what Bud says and how = he says it, and I don't want to seem to disagree in the least, but...   We might occasionally save a good word for efficient key pushers, if they have other things going for them.   I'm thinking of several old friends and acquaintances, men who I daresay don't play the organ as well as I do but I think the world of them, first = of all because they are much more capable choirmasters. Thinking of one in particular, a quiet, often wry gentleman, I tend to wonder how to describe his elusive but undoubted charisma, or explain why so many dearly love him so much. Perhaps the essence of it is "unflappable." Although choirs are his lifelong love and he is very dedicated in this area, he has practical knowledge and competence in quite an amazing number of others. I don't = know how he's picked it all up or has the energy (he's older than I am) to = pursue it all still. This breadth, as well as the unassuming warmth of his personality, make people feel *comfortable* and *secure* in his presence.   His organ playing is commensurate. It isn't flashy or particularly ambitious, but it is solid and dependable. Perhaps another word would be *courteous.* You won't hear many wrong notes or other surprises. But he knows the music, and he knows what he wants when he is directing and = someone else is accompanying. Because he puts himself into his playing like = that, I could listen to him (especially in a service context) for a long time.   (And I hope it isn't throwing fuel on the fire to mention this friend's impression of a certain recent WCC student's audition as choir director: that the applicant demonstrated the techniques they teach there now, but = he fears that many of them are obnoxious gimmicks that ultimately turn choir members off.)   One of my happiest experiences was several months as interim at a = cathedral. They were somehow delighted with both my playing and my directing = (probably the honeymoon effect). One of the choirmen was on the search committee = for the permanent organist-director and asked if I had any advice. I said, = "get the best choirmaster you can find and forget about the organ playing." (Happily, they found someone who excelled at both and has gone on to great things).          
(back) Subject: Re: releathering Moller chests From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:48:38 -0600   The Kilgen 4 rank I installed had soot on everything and I wondered the same thing, could this have helped preserve the leather, it was still = good. since 1925. ( Well,, no it wasn't as good as new, ;o) Luther   -----Original Message----- From: STRAIGHT <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 12:45 AM Subject: Re: releathering Moller chests     >Keep talking fellas. > And everything that comes apart has black dust in it------years of steam >engine soot. > You suppose that's a preservative? > >Grins, >Diane S. > >      
(back) Subject: Bach Dupre edition From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 14:33:04 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Not that I want to start an pro or contra argument...   I used the Dupre Edition for study. It was designed to play Bach on Cavaille-Coll (say: "Victorian") organs which are very different in touch and response from pre-1800 or post 1930 mech tracker organs. It's great = for PN or EP driven instruments too. Since these systems are widely used in America, this editions could be an interesting reference.   At first sight all these hundreds of itty bity tiny fingerings that are strawn all over the score look fearsome. But soon enough the eye gets accostumed to it :)   Dupre-School is "outdated" right now, but I still use the editions (hencefore they are not for sale :)) first because the fingerings and articulations are a great help (although I don't use them slavishly), = second because the edition costed me a wicked sum of money, third because I = cannot buy a "modern" edition, fourth because *yawn!*, I saw come and go too much tendencies in organ playing to be impressed by another change even when = it's claimed as "historic accurate" (?)- in ten years it will be outdated too!   I know renowned organ instructors who tell their students to use Dupre for study purposes. For everybody who is interested in using Dupre's Bach edition my advise is to read *carefully* the forewords because Dupre's articulation signs are non orthodox (no ties, dots or commas) but his instructions are very precise. If you follow them a beautiful articulation comes out. What you never should follow is the given registration- out of average and unaccurate kept it sounds horrible.   A last hint: Care for this edition- it's hard to get outside France, and very expensive. The cardboard cover should be protected, if possible reinforced because it wears out quickly.   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.        
(back) Subject: RE: CC's opinion about Walcker From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 14:34:35 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Firstly, Cavaille-Coll "possibly" demonstrates that he > did not fully understand the German tradition of early > romantic organ music.   I guess that too. The styles were too different. Further, I forgot to mention an important background (for non europeans): The tense = relationship between germans and french nevertheless they are neighbouring countries. Even in modern EU this goes on even when nobody likes to admit that.... perhaps CC had to tear down some prejudices?- The remark with the "five soldiers" was so typical. :)   > One wonders whether he truly understood the Baroque > background to German Romantic organ-building,   I referred only to Walcker organs in my post, but CC visited more organs = and organ buoilders in Germany, among them the Silbermann organs in = Strassbourg. His opinion was: "We... heard the organs from Silbermann, father and son. = As good as the foundation stops are as bad are the reeds; in short: = Concerning action and wind supply this organs have the same virtues and defects as = our own old instruments".   > In referring to "lungs", was Cavaille-Coll referring > to "wind-pressure" only?   CC wrote in a somewhat flourish style. For that it's not clear if he referred to wind pressure or wind supply system (reservoir capacity). In german we say about an organ with poor reservoir capacity or wind pressure drop problems that "it's asthmathic"...   > The comment about a "lack of clarity" is > interesting......my guess is that the Germanic use of > Tierces did not appeal to him. They certainly cloud > things to some extent, but they also impart a richness > to the chorus-work which, make often up for the > bloodless German reeds of the period.   To compare things we should listen to surviving organs of both masters = (Dom in Riga and St. Ouen in Rouen for example) to appreciate the differences.   > I learned something about the "cone chest" and the > forerunner of the general crescendo (Rollschweller?_) > which Andres sugests was invented by Merklin......more > information would be greatly appreciated on this.   Merklin worked for Walcker before he became independent. Perhaps he developed these systems while he was employee at the Walcker factory. I = will have to rummage a little more through my Acta Organologica collection and = do some translation (that's a weekend task)- I know there is an article about Walcker and the builders they trained and had as employees.   Concerning the Ulm Organ, CC mentions the Open Diapason 32' en facade, which greatest pipes had 2 feet in diameter and aprox. 40 feet length. Concerning fre reeds he liked the sound but preferred the quick response = of the on-beating reeds (is this term correct?)   Anyway it would be interesting to read the whole letters in the french original. Right now I start to learn french- but I am on the "bonjour", = "bon soir", "Bonne nuit" and "regardez la-bas"-level...:)   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.        
(back) Subject: RE: it's all in what you're USED to From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 14:36:59 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   > Robert Eversman wrote: > > > > Bud, I don't know how you keep all this straight ! It makes my = service look > > like a kindergarten affair ! Truly, I admire your great efforts. > > Robert, it's like riding a bicycle. If you do it from the cradle onward > (as I did), it's as natural as breathing ... my choir sings at LEAST > half the Mass from MEMORY (chuckle).   Just anecdotic: In venezuelan catholic church music service the organist has to sit at the organ, sing all chants and accompany himself on the instrument. I do that since I was fifteen without an extra thought. In 1996, the Culture Attache from the Japanese embassy visited the church with his wife and staff. They "opened nose, eyes and ears" when they saw what I am doing and couldn't appease themselves about a man who *plays the organ **and** sings at the same time!* When I told them that in my country since ever church musicians have to = work in other areas to do a living- as technicians, lawyers, businessmen, etc- = I get another quantity of "ahhs" and "ohhs" from the Japanese :)   Later on the attache told me that in Japan a musician can degree only in = one speciality: As singer *or* as organist- it's out of every consideration = that a musician does *both*, much less working in other professions...   Ain't this terrible?- Although sometimes I wish I could work as organ technician alone, I would die from boring if I never could play it, or = only could work as a *singer* (got a nice tenor bariton) :):)   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.